Blog

11/28/2020 18:56

I began writing my blog in the early spring of 2014, working at a school in the southern Swedish town of Växjö. For a while I had left my wife in Rome, though I frequently went back there. The reason why I had ended up in Sweden was that I could not find a steady job in Rome and it had recently been far too long between my consulting assignments. My mother was ninety-three years old, felt alone in her house and had become increasingly frail, though she had a perfectly clear mind and memory that was better than mine.

 

When we visited Sweden by the end of the summer of 2013, I thought it might be a good idea to work as a teacher for a while. Counting upon an education as high school teacher Swedish it used to be quite easy for me to get a job as such. Even though it had been several years since I worked in a school I had over the years accumulated quite a lot of teaching experience. I applied for a couple of jobs near Hässleholm, where my mother lived, and was offered a teaching position in nearby Kristianstad. However, one week before I was to start work, they called me and unexpectedly announced that they had “got hold of a younger ability that was probably better suited for the job.” I then traveled to Växjö, where I had received an earlier offer that I had declined since Kristianstad was closer. It turned out that they still wanted me as a teacher, which meant that I every morning took the train – an hour's journey that gave me time to prepare lessons and correct written tests.

 

 

It was a picturesque school, housed in Växjö's former locomotive sheds. The colleagues were nice and so were the students, which made me feel quite good, at the same time as it was reassuring to accompany my aging mother in the evenings. It was my younger sister, who well aware of my constant urge to write had suggested I ought to write a blog. Since then, I have been stuck with the habit.

 

At Smålandsgymnasiet, as in every other school I have worked in, the atmosphere differed from class to class. I have often wondered why it is like that. One of the classes was composed of prospective computer technicians. I soon discovered that a couple of them were avid readers of so-called fantasy literature and at the same time highly advanced computer gamers. They knew everything about a world I was barely aware of. I am too old for computer games and cannot imagine myself wasting time on such endeavours. Nevertheless, I wrote down the names of the games my students recommended and described with great enthusiasm. I assumed that knowing something about them must be part of general knowledge – Myst, Portal, The Secret of Monkey Island, Machinarium, Grim Fandango, The Cat Lady, Broken Sword, Bad Mojo, Amnesia.

 

 

It was somewhat difficult to understand how my students could find time to play with all that and still not be entirely lost when it came to assimilating the education I tried to provide them with. To my delight, several of them were avid novel readers and could recommend a wealth of literature I had never heard of. When asked who they thought was the best fantasy story writer, they unanimously answered – George R. R. Martin.

 

Admittedly, HBO Nordic was already broadcasting Game of Thrones, though I was unaware of that and it took me another year or two before I watched the TV series. At the library I borrowed the first part of Martin's massive book series A Song of Ice and Fire, though I found the first part of it – A Game of Thrones to be somewhat too thick and after reading a couple of chapters, I gave up. It felt as if I had read it all before; a sword called Ice, a ridiculous minstrel, a high castle with stairs carved out of the rock. There was too much dialogue for my taste, too many standard expressions, one-dimensional characters, either far too evil, or overly nice, a stupid princess, an aged weakening king, a scheming heir ...

 

 

However, after I had begun to watch the TV series I came to wonder if I had not been far too narrow-minded and presumptuous. I should probably have given K. K. Martin a better chance. The TV series was not at all predictable. Several of the characters were undeniably interesting, changing and deepening over the course of the story. It was dynamic, exciting and unexpected.

 

 

Despite my preconceived notions, I had already in Växjö read a few things about K. K. Martin, who looked like your typical New Age-cuddly man. In The Guardian I found an interview with the bestseller star, who I as an unknown author and fresh blogger unexpectedly could identify myself with. George R. R. Martin stated:

 

writers out there, they finish their books and no one cares whether their book is late or ever comes out at all. And then it comes out, two reviews are published and it sells 12 copies.

 

A fairly adequate description of my writing. Then he gave an excellent account of how I proceed when I write:

 

I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they're going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there's going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up. The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it. They kind of know what seed it is, they know if planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don't know how many branches it's going to have, they find out as it grows.

 

As a "writer", I belong to the gardeners' guild. I do not know how my blogs and novels will develop. Looking back, they are certainly wild-grown, unassuming gardens containing far too much thorns and weeds.

 

 

The seeds for the current blog are snow, ice and obsession and their significance for a certain kind of literature that for a long time has fascinated me, something I realized after reading Yoko Ogawa's The Memory Police. The reason for me picking up that particular novel book was constant complaints from members of my family pointing out that my memory is becoming worse and worse, though I don´t find it significantly different from what it always has been. Like many other persons, I tend to be absent-minded and forget where I placed a lot of important stuff – keys, glasses, old certificates, receipts and “important documents”, though I am quite convinced that it has always been like that for me.

 

Nevertheless, what worries me more and more is that when I look back at my ever increasing lifespan I discover that large blocks of events have disappeared and left gaping voids, or even worse – nothing at all. Big chunks of my past has gone away without leaving any trace at all. I am thus reminded of the Italian expression un buco nell´aqua, a hole in the water. Like a drop when it disappears in a body of water, this concerns not only names of friends and acquaintances, even individuals who I have known quite well are lost for ever in the mists of my murky memory. However, this does not hinder that “memory blocks” might unexpectedly come up to the surface of my consciousness.

 

 

To me, novels quite often constitute such “memory blocks”. I take out a book from one of my bookshelves and suddenly remember when I bought and read it. After reading Ogawa's Memory Police, I came to recall Brian Aldiss´s Frankenstein Unbound, namely because is deals with something that might be called “time blocks”, though in the novel they are called timeslips, a phenomenon meaning that the past, or the future, may invade our current existence.

 

I first read Aldiss´s novel sometime in the mid-seventies and as often is the case I had become attracted by its cover, perhaps in a similar fashion a sI may chose a bottle of wine because the label appeals to me. I assumed that the title alluded to a rather illegible play by Percy Bysshe Shellley, Prometheus Unbound, which had surfaced during my literature studies. I now think it could have been in connection with a lecture dealing with the Swedish author August Strindberg, who revolted against almost everything and everyone and like Shelley occasionally compared himself, both politically and personally, to the mythological titan Prometheus. This ancient archetype for rebellion had opposed the dictatorship of the almighty Olympian gods and had accordingly been punished in a bestial manner. He was chained to a cliff in the Caucasus where a vulture constantly hacked and devoured his liver, which, however, repeatedly grew back. In his autobiography The Maid's Son, Strindberg wrote:

 

It is quite physiologically correct that the ancient poet made Prometheus´s liver to be gnawed by the vulture. Prometheus was a rebel who tried to enlighten the people […] he was gravely affected by experiencing the world as a madhouse where idiots are running around declaring that sane persons constitute a life-threatening danger. Diseases can change a person's views and everyone knows how dark all thoughts become when you are harassed by fever.

 

 

In Frankensten Unbound, written in 1974, Aldiss described how the scientist Joe Bodenland sometime in 2020 with his car drives straight into a timeslip, a concept that probably is in need of some explanation. A World War had created catastrophic conditions. Warring superpowers realized that engaging in nuclear warfare on Earth would have fatal consequences for all combatants, instead specific Space Forces had been developed and armed power struggle were relocated to the space between the moon and earth, where spaceships battled each other with nuclear arms.

 

When peace finally had been re-established, incurable damage had been made not to planet Earth, which remained a habitable, though an unpredictable, place. Development had continued unabated and created a high-tech culture with a maintained biosphere. However, the distant nuclear wars had shaken up and altered the time-space continuum. This meant that some of the earth's individuals, who at a random time found themselves in certain places unexpected could be thrown into another time dimension. Such a condition could last for longer or shorter time periods, until time scales had corrected themselves and the affected individual was brought back to the time and place where s/he had been engulfed by a timeslip.

 

 

With his car Joe Bodenland is tossed through space-time and ends up in early 19th-century Switzerland. There he meets Doctor Victor Frankenstein. It turns out that his monster actually exists and so does Mary Shelley, the author who wrote the story about Frankenstein and his monster.

 

When Joe Bodenland met Mary Shelley in 1816, she was still named Mary Godwin and had neither written her famous novel Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus, nor married Percy Bysshe Shelley who in 1820, two years after Frankenstein was published, had written his Prometheus Unbound. When Bodenland meets them, Percy Shelley and Mary Godwin live together with Lord Byron in a villa by Lake Geneva.

 

 

Joe Bodenland realizes that the creation of Frankenstein's monster is the beginning of a catastrophic development that will eventually will lead to manipulation of the human genome and thus have as devastating consequences as those that followed the invention of the atomic bomb. Aldiss uninhibitedly mixed literature and science and his quite mad novel actually asks important questions about the responsibility of scientists and the role of our creative imagination when it comes to making people aware of the meaning their own existence and responsibility for the course of development. Something that might be difficult to notice beneath the surface of a thrilling adventure story based on Mary Shelley's novel, as well as all sorts of science fiction stories and action movies, such as the James Bond movies.

 

 

For example, Aldiss's monster has more features in common with Mary Shelley's original creation than with William Wyler's famous screen version of it. This is does not mean that Aldiss was not inspired by Boris Karloff's monster rendition. Aldiss´s portrayal of the monster coincides with both the novel's and the film's description of a creature which does not know what to do after its awakening as a monster. Accordingly, it behaves as children often do; it thoughtlessly strikes out at things it does not understand and disapproves of, asking awkward questions and making unreasonable demands. Nevertheless, like in Shelley's novel, Aldiss´s monster is also a sensitive being, which main aspiration is to be able to share its life with a creature who thinks and feels like it. However, the monster is feared and rejected and when confronted with its mirror image it understands why others feel disgust at its mere complexion.

 

In the novel, the monster is both eloquent and erudite, within eleven months of its creation it had learned to speak both German and French. However, when it in its desperation and disappointment about its wretched nature realizes what its creator, Dr. Frankenstein, has done while driven by his recklessness and megalomania, the monster swears to crush and destroy his own creator.

 

 

The inspiration from Bond films is in Aldiss's novel especially evident through Joe Bodenland's car, which follows him to the shores of Lake Geneva and impresses both the young Mary Godwin and the scientist Victor Frankenstein. His vehicle does not use fossil fuels, is equipped with GPS, a screen monitor, mobile phone and an omniscient function not entirely different from, though certainly more sophisticated, than today's Siri. Like a Bond car, Bodenland´s streamlined, Italian manufactured limousine, Aztec, is furthermore equipped with sophisticated weaponry. Such details makes that Aldiss's novel actually worka as credible work of science fiction. Joe Bodenland's car is rather astonishing considering that in 2020 it does not actually appear as outdated, like so much other science fiction written in anno dazumal.

 

 

Madness is undeniably present in Aldiss's novel, but are snow and ice, which I mentioned above as seeds for this blog entry, also present? Certainly, both Shelley's and Aldiss's novels finish with a hunt for the monster over deserted snowy expanses. With Shelley, it takes place in unexplored polar regions, by Aldiss within a timeslip in a distant future where Joe Bodenland's surroundings seem to fall apart in a devastated world, created by his own actions in a distant past. This makes Aldiss´s time travels in his Frankenstein Unbound akin to Stephen King's strange and impressive time travel novel 11/22/63, in which a man travels back in time and manages to prevent Lee Harvey Oswald´s murder of John F. Kennedy, only to find that his heroic act in the future will have disastrous consequences, something he could not have expected in 1963.

 

 

It is doubtful whether Anna Kavan's Ice might be labeled as a science fiction novel. It takes place in a parallel reality that may possibly be located in the future, but this is uncertain. Nor does it seem to depict a bygone, distant time. The novel assumes the existence of cars, trains, planes and gramophones, though the reader may suddenly find her/himself in the midst of a bloody looting of a city, where sword-wielding and armored riders massacre the inhabitants. Or within a Nordic ruined city where a virgin is sacrificed to a dragon living at the bottom of a fjord. I bought the novel at the same time as Frankenstein Unbound and as I now read it again I find to my surprise that Aldiss had written a preface in which he described Anna Kavan as a writer who trhotugh Kafka had found a key how to portray a reality, which she perceived as being extremely threatening.

 

 

Kavan's novel appears to take place during the uncertain peace after a devastating war between superpowers. Cities are in ruins while heavily armed soldiers are checking citizens, asking for documents and controlling that curfews are being complied with. We seem to find ourselves in a country, or even a world, ruled by a totalitarian regime. By the beginning of the novel, the narrator, an obviously wealthy writer, visits an acquaintance who is an artist and married to a fragile, ethereal and extremely sensitive woman, who might previously have been engaged to the author. Her husband, the artist, treats his elusive wife badly and she disappears. The husband's indifference and demonic personality make the author suspect that he has murdered his wife. However, the author´s investigations trace her leads him to a remote coastal town in a country reminiscent of Norway. There the women is held captive by The Warden, a warlord who surrounded by a well-equipped private army lives in a luxurious palace. The town´s inhabitants are suspicious and brutal and their standard of living seem to be at a medieval, reminding me of The Game of Thrones, not the east considering that there is a huge wall outside the city and the country, perhaps even the rest of the world, is threatened by relentlessly approaching, enormous ice sheet.

 

 

In The Game of Thrones, Westeros' southern lands are protected by a huge wall that rises against northern vast expanses of snow from which ice phantoms are approaching in an intent to subjugate Westeros and wipe out its warring clans. The threat is expressed in the motto of the House of Stark, Westeros' northern wall keepers: Winter is Coming. I do not assume that K.K. Martin was inspired by Anna Kavan's Ice, though he was for sure aware of the Fimbul Winter of Norse mythology, the winter that will prevail uninterruptedly for three years before Ragnarök takes place – the final Armageddon.

 

The well-traveled Anna Kavan had certainly Nordic countries in mind when she wrote Ice, but she was probably mainly inspired by the two years she spent in New Zealand during World War II, worried about the war events in the north and a strong awareness of the proximity to Antarctic ice masses in the south. Despite descriptions of a threatening, strange landscape, it is an inner emotional state that Kavan portrays and projects onto the characters' surroundings. Perspectives are constantly shifting – from the intimate to the vast. The narrator gradually seems to merge with the brutal Warden, while the pale woman is constantly portrayed as an elusive, but tormented victim. Anna Kavan has to many of her readers become a “feminist icon” and her novel has been interpreted as a demonstration of how global political violence and a threatening environmental degradation might be linked to a frightening “erotic objectification” of women, turning them into victims of a self-destructive and emotionally cold collective.

 

 

I am not sure if Anna Kavan had read the Norwegian author Tarjei Vesaa's novel The Ice Palace which was written in 1963 and in 1966 was published in an English translation, i.e. the year before Kavan´s Ice came out. It is not impossible that she had read it since Vesaas's novel was published by Peter Owen, Kavan´s friend and publisher. Like Kavan´s Ice Vesaas's novel dealt with alienation and coldness from a female perspective. However, despite its symbolic undercurrents it appears to be a strictly realistic tale.

 

In an isolated Norwegian village, the lively, eleven-year-old Siss (Sissela) becomes good friends with the withdrawn and somewhat odd and awkward Unn. When the girls during the first day of their acquaintance play alone together, they find themselves strangely attracted to each other. The outward-looking, self-assured Siss discovers something of herself in the serious and tormented loner Unn, and vice versa.

 

 

Unn is enchanted by the open-minded, laughing Siss and manages to persuade her that they should undress. As they stand naked in front of each other, Unn wonders if Siss can see any difference between them. When Siss answers that she cannot discern anything out of the normal, Unn explains that she knows that something is wrong with her. She is afraid of not being allowed into heaven after her death. She accuses herself of being the reason for her mother´s death six months earlier and she does not know who her father is.

 

After they have gotten dressed again, Siss becomes anxious, worried and scared. She runs home in the dark and like Unn she spends a sleepless night. The following day, Unn cannot bring herself to come to school and there be confronted with her newfound friend. Instead, she seeks out the “ice palace”, huge ice formations that during harsh Nordic winters are formed by frozen water around large waterfalls. Driven by a child's urge to test and challenge itself, Unn enters the ice halls. Impressed by the mysterious and perishable beauty of the ice caves, she thinks about herself and Siss. Unn finally gets lost in the cold darkness, treads through the ice and drowns.

 

The villagers believe Siss knows more about Unn's disappearance than she reveals. The weight of guilt and sorrow make Siss to shoulder Unn´s role as an outsider and she eventually becomes a loner both at home and at school. The Ice Palace is a seemingly realistic story, though sparse and lyrical it hides abysmal depths beneath its surface, making me think of masterful Japanese haikus where nature and certain moods within a strictly limited space are enabled to create images of inner emotional states.

 

 

Novels like The Ice Palace, and also to some extent Ice, and of course Kafka's work, written as they are in a straightforward, obviously realistic manner lure their readers into a world that is both mad and sensible. Such literary works reflect what J. R. R. Tolkien once wrote about fairy tales ”the keener and clearer is the reason, the better fantasy it will make.” What Tolkien appears to mean is that fairy tales and fantasy stories, like dreams, require inner logic and clarity. A kind of realism which within its specific framework gradually becomes something completely different – dreams that reveal what our existence really is and maybe even what it means.

 

 

I was thinking about this yesterday while watching Jan Švankmajer's film Alice, which my eldest daughter had sent me from Prague. A few years go, we did together visit an exhibition with Švankmajer's eerie, but at the same time humorous “sculptures”. Theyare some kind of collages of stuffed animals and skeletal parts, reminiscent of the curiosity cabinets which during the Baroque era were popular among European princes. 

 

Not least with Rudolph II, the eccentric emperor of the German-Roman Empire who lived in the royal castle Pražský hrad in Prague, where he gathered alchemists, magicians, artists and ingenious scientists. A worsening mental illness prevented him from governing an empire that was collapsing under the pressure of religious strife and he was finally forced to abdicate, handing over the imperial crown to his brother and he eventually died as a mad loner.

 

 

Švankmajer´s Alice is actually called Nĕco z Alenky, Something about Alice, and is a free interpretation of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, a book I have read several times, amazed at how someone managed to portray a child's dream world. Švankmajer's film is a stop motion animation, populated by a real Alice moving among and inter-acting with his grotesque creations; creepy, malignant dolls and bizarre animals within dilapidated rooms and crumbling tenement houses. A terrifying, imaginative and, like Kafka's stories, strangely humorous universe.

 

 

This is how Alice in Wonderland should be interpreted, neither as slavishly as Disney did to a large extent in his per se ingenious interpretation, nor completely made-up and ridiculously simplified as Tim Burton's disastrous version, which is one of my greatest disappointments as addicted movie goer. I had expected something completely different from someone like Burton than a pastel-coloured and extremely silly “struggle to save Wonderland”. Yuk!

 

 

Unlike Burton, Švankmajer created a masterpiece – a parallel and inventive version of Caroll's Wonderland, seen through a child's eyes, interpreted with a child's wonder, boldness and worries. A dream beyond good and evil. Distanced from adult, judgmental and moralizing pointers, Švankmajer boldly entered a child's distorted, but at the same time deeply personal and truly imaginary world.

 

An abnormality that also characterizes the world Anna Kavan depicted in her novel. Kavan´s original name was Helen Emily Woods. She was the only, lonely and largely ignored child in a dysfunctional family. When she was eleven years old, her father took his own life and when she was nineteen-years-old her mother forced her daughter to marry her own estranged lover. He made Anna with children and took her to Burma, where he worked as a railway engineer. They divorced after three years of utter discord.

 

 

When Helen Woods changed her name to Anna Kavan, it was one of many breakups within an unsteady existence. During the twenties she lived among race-car drivers at the Riviera and founded a lifelong heroin addiction, far from being alleviated during her later life within various artistic circles. Anna went in and out of various mental institutions and was unable to free herself from an addiction that eventuality became a contributing factor to her death in 1968.

 

 

In addition to her writing, Anna Kavan was a talented painter whose art often reflects her fictional worlds, with their poetic beauty and uncanny, suggestive power. Creating such worlds as well as being both a painter and a writer are talents Kavan shared with several women, for example Leonora Carrington, whose strange novel Down Below depicts a distorted reality. Carrington wrote Down Below during a deep crisis, when she, like Kavan often was, had been imprisoned within a mental ward.

 

 

Carrington's art makes me associate with the Finno-Swedish author/artist Tove Jansson, who for certain was not crazy at all, but like Kavan and Carrington managed to create a parallel world of lyricism and beauty, as well as threatening mystery and danger.

 

 

Tove Jansson's imaginary Moomin Valley is surrounded by dark woods, misty mountains and a sea inhabited by mysterious and occasionally dangerous creature, though nevertheless mellowed by the warmth and intimate security of the good-natured, generous and playfully imaginative Moomin family.

 

Tove Jansson's cerates a unique world like the landscape of Michael Ende's novel Momo, although in his case the scenery is more than in Jansson's case connected to reality, namely Italy where the German Ende spent the larger part of his life. Like the ladies mentioned above Ende was also a writing artist. In Momo, as in Kavan's Ice, the world is threatened by a soul-killing chill. In Momo it is gray men in the service of an ever-present, menacing commercialism and totalitarianism, which are stealing time to kill imagination and creativity in their life-hostile quest to align human existence from creativity and happiness and thus turn each and every one of us into an ignorant consumer.

 

 

Two of my other favorite novels have also been written by painters – Alfred Kubin's The Other Side and Giorgio de Chrico´s Hebdomeros. Kubin's novel is a dark fable about a city slowly decaying in step with a despot's physical deterioration and moral ruin. The modernity of Kubin´s nightmarish city, combined as it is with ancient, dilapidated quarters and underground tunnels, mad me think of Prague. The general disintegration under an increasingly insane ruler might have been inspired by Rudolph the Second´s crumbling empire, or its equivalent in a doomed Austrian-Hungarian Empire, the novel was written in 1908. Kubin knew Kafka and was a frequent visitor to Prague and his dark and threatening world is not entirely different from Ana Kavan's ice world, although his story takes place within a more tropical climate.

 

 

Despite its richness of images and cinematic scenes, The Other Side has a more or less stable narrative structure. de Chirico's Hebdomeros, on the other hand, is more similar to Kavan's Ice in the sense that the Italian artist's novel appears as a kind of picture collage, without any clear sequence of events. Hebdomeros has even more sharp and abrupt transitions between pictures and episodes than Kavan´s Ice, though it is also, in my opinion, more lyrical and painterly. Hebdomeros was written in 1929, but was then published in a limited edition and remained virtually unknown until 1964, when it was recognized as perhaps the foremost “surrealist” novel ever written. This despite the fact that Chirico did not consider himself to be a surrealist and did furthermore in his later years disregard his only novel, which he wrote in French, an impressive achievement considering that Chirico with another mother tongue than French nevertheless was able to express himself in such a lyrical and quaint manner.

 

 

Hebdomeros captures the moods of Chirico's paintings, occasionally illuminated by the warmth and light of the Mediterranean, though also endowed with its darker undertones. In spite of its modernity Hebdomeros provides an impression of being firmly rooted in a millennial old tradition of art and aesthetics. A landscape that with its classic allusions nevertheless integrates modern elements such as trains and factory chimneys.

 

The novels mentioned above may be grouped under the heading of Slipstream, a literary term introduced in 1989 by the American science fiction writer Bruce Sterling, in an attempt to categorize literary works that brings unrealistic elements – such as fairy tales, science fiction, dreams, fantasy and surrealism – into depictions/stories that appear to be quite realistic and usually take place in a contemporary environment.

 

Slipstream is an aerodynamic concept, used in motor – and cycling sports. If a vehicle travels at high speed, a negative pressure is created behind it, which in turn gives rise to lower air resistance. A vehicle that is just behind another vehicle traveling at high speed might then take advantage of the air suction behind it, gain more speed and eventually overtake it.

 

 

Sterling, who in his writing often uses rather peculiar associations and invented words, stated that a narrative stream, such as a realistic approach, creates a kind of slipstream that a different approach to story telling, like fantasy or science fictionmay use to discretely slide in behind, hook up to and eventually pass by, thus creating something completely different, and generally even better. Sterling described the feeling that arises when you read a slipstream story:

 

this is a kind of writing which simply makes you feel very strange; the way that living in the twentieth century makes you feel, if you are a person of a certain sensibility.

High technology has changed our society at breakneck speed – mobile phones and computers now connect people, but at the same time it appears as if more and more of us are losing touch with reality. As the physical closeness to other people has decreased, consequences of our actions have also become increasingly diffuse.

 

We can now kill our fellow human beings with a drone. If we have questions and complaints, we are referred to websites and digital voices. Technology has even entered our most intimate spheres. A possible consequence of intercourse is no longer the birth of a child. Such beings can now be bought for a price and provided through sperm banks and/or surrogate mothers. Sexual intercourse does not necessary imply an act of deep and intimate connection between two persons who truly love each other and thereby are willing to take joint responsibility for the consequences of their actions. In these modern times, sexuality has for several of us been transformed into yet another commodity; a performance, a mechanical act focusing solely on physical satisfaction. Of course you might argue that this has always been the case – prostitution has always existed within human societies.

 

Sure, but now technology has changed those circumstances as well. As technology reduces risks and consequences, people now seek out surrogates for things that previously engaged, frightened and upset us. Everything that Edmund Burke in the middle of the eighteenth century called the subtle, that is, something that is the opposite of intimacy and security, something that calms our nerves. The subtle, on the other hand, tenses the nerves, frightens and excites us, but in return makes life more unpredictable and exciting.

 

 

Slipstream literature has often proved top be able to indicate the discrepancy between the real and the imagined by indicating how commercialism disguises itself as if it represented real life, when it in reality it only mimics dreams and hopes and puts a price on its charades to make a profit.

 

The slipstream concept suggests movement and can thus be linked to modernism in the sense that it constitutes a kind of comment to a complicated reality; a current “now” that we all are surrounded by. A slipstream author and the world s/he creates arises because s/he actually is a stranger in our time and thus views our existence from her/his perspective of exclusion. Creations of such writers might take the appearance of parallel worlds; magic mirrors that both distort and reveal who we actually are. Like when Frankenstein's monster by looking at his mirror image was struck by the painful realization that he actually was a freak, an abomination.

 

 

In our modern world, we exist within a state of constant change and thus literature created by slipstream writers becomes “fluid” as well, adaptable and changeable. Like myths and dreams, it is constantly opening up itself to new interpretations.

 

The sociologist Zygmunt Bauman who devoted a number of books to the stranger and alienation, occasionally related art to liquidity. According to him, liquidity is largely the same as volatility, a state of being that has become dominant within in our current existence.

 

I interpret Bauman's arguments as indicating that we are looking for insights that ultimately turn out to be nothing more than acts of constant creation, i.e. movement and change which do not lead to an ultimate goal. Basically, we are not striving for a goal at all. Our longing, our actions and desires, are being limited by desire/lust. The purpose, goal and meaning of our existence have disappeared. Our worst fear has become the possibility of actually achieving complete satisfaction – Salvation.

 

 

True art might possibly help to transform what is short-term into something permanent, something supernatural, even divine. Strangely enough, within our uniform, global existence, individualism and self-righteousness are celebrated at the expense of established, moral values, for example in the form of a general cooperation respecting human rights and trying to preserve the earth's natural resources. We do not provide ourselves with neither time nor space to realize something that might benefit us all. Instead we rush around in our highly personal, narcissistic treadmills. Slipstream literature, however, places itself on the sidelines and through its alienating and alternative viewpoints it indicate how absurd our current existence actually is.

 

 

Modern life means that high tech has reduced risks and consequences. People are now inclined to find surrogates for experiences that previously were able to engage or/and upset us. Compensations for previously strong emotions are not only limited to digital experiences, technologically sustained adrenaline stimulating real-life risk-taking are also offered – like bungee jumping, parachuting, rock climbing and the like. The main technological surrogate and an easy manner for obtaining life-affirming adrenaline rushes and endorphine kicks might still be car driving, preferably in luxury vehicles and at a high speed. A pleasure that for commercial reasons often has become associated with sex. A luxury vehicle attracts sexual partners and enhances our prestige:

 

 

 

A comfortable, beautiful car can may envelop us in soothing comfort and impart a sense of well-being and confidence, as in Bruce Springsteen's Pink Cadillac:

 

I love you for your pink Cadillac.

Crushed velvet seats.

Riding in the back,

Oozing down the street.

Waving to the girls,

Feeling out of sight.

Spending all my money

On a Saturday night.

Quite a number of American songs pay homage to the freedom of Open Higways, rides into the wilderness and freedom of the unknown. However, this does not prevent such rides from also being journeys mixed up with anxiety, and perhaps even fear. Springsteen again – Stolen car:

 

And I’m driving a stolen car
On a pitch black night.
And I’m telling myself I’m gonna be alright
But I ride by night and I travel in fear
That in this darkness I will disappear

 

Watch the sequence from Hitchcock's Psycho where Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), after stealing USD 40,000 from her employer, to the accompaniment of Bernard Herrman's evocative music, travels through a darkening night on her way a rendezvous with death at the Bates Motel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSlo44VO-lE&ab_channel=scaringeachother

 

 

Someone sitting behind a wheel is, by the way, among American movies´ most common screen shots. In the US, the a car often appears to be an integral part of most citizens' lives. A friend of mine living in the USA once told me that he was going to invest his hard-earned money in a new, luxurious car, even if he actually could not afford one. When I asked why he made such a stupid investment, he replied: “I have to be able to look my children straight into their eyes. I do not want them to be ashamed of having a loser as a dad. A bastard who cannot even afford a proper car.”

 

Oh, Lord won't you buy me a Mercedes Benz.
My friends all drive Porsches, I must make amends.
Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends.
So, oh Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes Benz.

 

I remember how when I visited one of my sisters-in-law in Miami and found there were no sidewalks in her neighbourhood and how I during my morning strolls felt how her neighbours suspiciously watched me, brooding behind their curtains or while mowing their implacable lawns. A pedestrian! It must be a shady character, even if he is white and reasonably well-dressed.

 

No wonder if a car there may be considered part of your personality. Stephen King is undeniably a slipstream writer able to transform The American Way to something quite sinister, creating horror from all sorts of gadgets surrounding the nations´s inhabitants; mobile phones, lawn mowers, croquet clubs, food processors, ovens and of course – cars.

 

 

In King's parallel universe, cars are occasionally killing machines possessing their owners, like a Plymouth Fury in Christine, a Buick Roadmaster in From a Buick 8, or a Mercedes Benz in Mr. Mercedes, not to mention the trucks gone mad in King's self-directed flophouse movie Maximum Overdrive.

 

 

Perhaps it is this mixture of freedom, sex, cars and death that has given rise to a sub-genre of action photography – car accident pictures. With masters like Arthur Fellig (Weegee):

 

 

And the Mexican Enrique Metinides:

 

 

Andy Warhol, who with his great interest in commercialism, emotional coldness, sex and death can possibly be considered as the archetype of Zygmunt Bauman's outsider artist, devoted a number of his works to car accidents.

 

 

Warhol was also fascinated by celebrity and its importance for glamour and commercialism, something that has also coloured the cult of cars and car accidents, with victims like James Dean – “live hard and die young.”

 

 

Or Jackson Pollock, who maybe was a Slipstream Artist:

 

It seems to me that the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or of any other past culture. Each age finds its own technique. [...] The modern artist, it seems to me, is working and expressing an inner world – in other words ... expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces.

 

 

Once technology has made its entry into the human sphere; from fire and wheels, to printing presses, trains, radio, aircraft, TV, the Intranet, sophisticated weaponry and … cars, everyone's lives has changed to an extent that it is difficult to fathom. Cars were invented as an effective and comfortable means of transport, but as we have seen above they soon became so much more, including incarnations of more or less hidden desires. If we had been better intellectually equipped, more morally oriented, we might have been able to use our sophisticated technology for better purposes. Now it seems to threaten us instead, as though we were stuck in a car while traveling at high speed towards a final accident, a crash. A dangerous, but incomprehensible world:

 

But deep inside my heart
I know I can't escape.
Oh, Mama, can this really be the end
to be stuck inside of Mobile
with the Memphis blues again?

 

 

The fault does not lie in our tools, it is part our own constitution.

 

As I write this, I am reminded that Bruce Sterling is a great admirer of James Graham Ballard and mentioned him as an excellent forerunner of current slipstream writers. A few years ago, I did in accordance with my habits check out the books on a table in FAO's foyer where people leave their used books and found J.G. Ballard's novel Crash. Then I only knew the author as the author of the Kingdom of the Sun, inspiration for Spielberg's film with the same name and I also vaguely recalled that the nasty, yet skillful and fascinating David Cronenberg had made a film with the same name as the novel I held in my hand.

 

 

It turned out that my assumption was correct, but I have seldom read such an appaling, yes … disgusting novel as Ballard's Crash. Since I cannot find it anywhere among my books here at home, I fear that I have thrown it away. If this has been the case I now regret it. Even though it now has been several years since I read Crash, it has remained with me and then not as a perverted deviation, but actually as an interesting depiction of our contemporary madness and its mixture of body, psyche, sex, death drive and high technology. That I now began looking for Ballard´s book is because he has increasingly come to be hailed as an outsider artist who early on realized where our society was heading. In one of his novels, Cocaine Nights, Ballard stated:

 

The consumer society hungers for the deviant and the unexpected What else can drive the bizarre shifts in the entertainment landscape that will keep us buying? […] Only one thing is left which can rouse people … Crime and transgressive behaviour – by which I mean all activities that aren´t necessarily illegal, but provoke us and tap our need for strong emotion, quicken the nervous system and jump the synapses deadened by leisure an inaction.

 

 

The condition described in Ballard´s Crash actually has a name – symphorophilia, from the Greek symphora, accident, and diagnosticates someone as a victim of a mental disorder which means obtaining sexual arousal from arranging or witnessing a violent tragedy, such as a car accident. The term was actually coined twenty years after Ballard's book had been published. John William Money (1921-2006) identified the disorder as an extreme form of paraphilia, i.e. a morbid desire for sexual stimulation from objects, or beings, which among normal people, in general, do not arouse any perverted cravings, or trigger morally reprehensible acts.

 

Money, who was professor of pediatrics and clinical psychology at the prestigious John Hopkins University in Baltimore, did himself become a victim of the beguiling impact technology might have on fixed ideas. John Money was a renowned expert on sexual identity and gender roles, with intersexuality, or so-called transgender, as his specialty. Money´s importance for gender research has been epoch-making, among other achievements he introduced terms such as gender identitygender roles, and sexual orientation.

 

 

As a specialist in gender identity, Money occasionally recommended surgery and hormone treatment to bring about radical gender reassignment of children, as well as young men and women. Something that had catastrophic consequences for several of his patients, who when they grew up found that their floating gender identities while being young and inexperienced were just part of a psychological maturation process. This aspect of Money's activities was scrutinized in an upsetting book, As Nature Made Him, written by the investigative journalist John Colapinto and in which he revealed the medical arrogance and often misguided research of Dr. Money.

 

As a foretaste of the madness exposed in Crash and in the wake of Andy Warhol´s artistic endeavours, Ballard did in 1970 organize an exhibition with pictures of fatal car accidents, they were presented without comment and caused a moral uproar.

 

Three years later, Ballard's fascination with the morbid subject of lethal car accidents culminated with his novel Crash. When I read it, I was totally unprepared for this orgy of death, violence and sex, written by someone who appeared to be entirely uninhibited when it came to his fixation on what I perceived as an appalling perversion. An obvious psychopath who reveled in ruminations about every conceivable aspect of how human body parts and fluids after a car accident could mingle with the distorted metal, twisted radiator grilles and cascading windshield glass. Page up and page down Ballard elaborately described various sex scenes, always in connection with driving and car accidents. A scenery as confined and grotesquely distorted as in Marquise the Sade´s sterile and monotonous novels. Ballard´s book was just like de Sade´s oeuvre tedious and disgusting, utterly devoid of any form of joy and compassion.

 

 

By Ballard, eroticism becomes intimately combined with technology and mechanics, and thus profaned, commercialized and liberated from nature. After a while, the shock effect wears off, leaving behind a wonderment that someone had been able to write something like that. I do not remember if I finished the novel.

 

The story is told by a person with the same name as the author. Like Ballard, he lives in Shepperton, a suburb of London, close to one of the highways leading to the Heathrow Airport. Although Ballard deliberately obscures the similarities, the reader understands that there is a connection between the protagonist's and the author's fascination with violent car accidents. The novel's narrator is attracted, sexually as well as intellectually, to a former “TV scientist” who has become a “highway nightmare angel” and with a car equipped with police radio tries to seek out every terrible accident that is reported over it. Unreasonably excited, he shows up with his cameras and revel in blood and wreckage.

 

After being seriously injured in a car accident, Ballard becomes more familiar with the demonic accident aficionado and soon joins a company of alienated lunatics, survivors of excruciating accidents, who slavishly follow the perverted symphorophilia maniac in his pursuit of disasters. Gradually, the grotesque gang contributes to staging traffic accidents, often with fatal consequences for both themselves and their victims. The leader's ultimate wish is to die in a frontal collision with Elizabeth Taylor.

 

 

After my distaste for the novel had subsided, I began thinking about Crash and after a while considered it in another light and this was the reason to why I am now searching for it. Maybe it was after all Ballard´s intention to create a distaste for our culture´s sick veneration of awful, adrenaline rousing disasters? Maybe his perverse description of a brutal lack of empathy was a critique of the emotionless mindset that affects so many of us? A condemnation of a technologized culture and the heartlessness, the contempt for real love and compassion, it has created. How it has invaded and poisoned not only our thinking but also our bodies and our subconscious mind.

 

Possibly Crash deals with how people have been affected by a soul destroying numbness after experiencing profound depressions following upon life changing experiences. How they have been alienated from reality and fallen victim to depraved obsessions worsened after they have met people with similar experiences and perverse longings that carefully have been kept out of sight. A life where everything and everyone is exploited within a debauched environment where lack of morals and distorted lives benefit from an anti-human technology that relentlessly drive them towards the ultimate goal, which is the same for all of us – Death.

 

 

Yoko Ogawa's The Memory Police finds itself far from the frantic madness of Ballard's Crash, though Bruce Sterling would certainly have characterized her novel as a slipstream product as well. It takes place in a port city on an isolated island, which nevertheless seems to be large and self-sufficient. Few things suggest that the development of events does not take place in our current modern times – there are cars, trains, shops, offices, schools and libraries. People, habits and infrastructure provide the impression that this could be almost anywhere, though subtle shifts and details makes The Memory Police slipstream novel that evoke associations to works like Orwell's 1984 and Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451. However, according to my opinion, Ogawa´s novel and its lyrical mode is a unique work of art.

 

 

Perhaps Ogawa´s storytelling is part of a specific Japanese narrative, which I assume I have discerned in writers like Kobo Abe, and especially in a novel by Taichi Yamada – Strangers. In Yamada's novel a TV screenwriter does after a failed marriage end up in a huge, former apartment building in central Tokyo. Due to insurmountable rents most of the apartments have been abandoned by their previous tenants and converted into offices, which means that the screenwriter at night finds himself to be almost alone in an otherwise empty building. He is tormented by nightmares and memories of his past love and security, has difficulty in sleeping and wanders around in a Tokyo that at night obtains a spooky character. At a bar, he encounters his long-deceased father, or someone who is eerily akin to him. He is later on invited home to something that appears to be his the dead parents' home where he is greated by someone exactly like his mother. It seems as if there in Tokyo exists a parallel universe where the past survives. When the main character late at nights returns to his apartment he is occasionally visited by a beautiful woman who seems to be one of the few remaining tenants in a building where he otherwise only encounters the doorman.

 

 

Several Japanese horror films, myths and fairy tales suggest that Japan is populated by ghosts, spirits and demons, perhaps a reflection of an ancient belief in kami, a term that may tentatively be interpreted as “natural gods” or “spirits”. Kami can be enclosed by animal – and human shapes, as well as inhibit various objects, while haunting specific places. Like Yamada's nocturnal Tokyo, Ogawa's island is a place beyond experience.

 

Unlike the twisted lunatics in Ballard's Crash, the characters of Ogawas Memorial Police are generally kind and caring. All o tfhem are however subject to the tyranny of a mysterious Memory Police, who armed and uniformed drive around in armoured vehicles. There is also an ever-present incomprehensible, but seemingly accommodating bureaucracy, which serves a repressive and invisible regime. For reasons unknown to us, the rulers of the island nations have hermetically sealed off their reign from the outside world and strive to erase all memories from its inhabitants. At regular intervals there come decrees that, for example, all roses have to disappear, and another day it could be birds or books. It seems that both culture and nature slavishly abide to such decrees – rivers and sea shores are one say filled with rose petals that soon disappear, at other instances large flocks of birds leave the island. One morning, the island's inhabitants may wake up to find that they have lost their sense of smell, or that no bird can be found. As if they want the loss to be as total and permanent possibble and thus not plague them with any memory of it, people voluntarily destroy banned plants, books and other things that the Memory Police intend to eradicate.

 

The Memory Police are not confronted in any manner, their suppression encounters no resistance. They take away people who refuse to follow directives and/or show signs of not being able, or wanting to forget. Abducted persons do not return. It is rumored that they are taken to institutions where research is being carried out to identify and eradicate genes and brain functions that create and support memory functions. Although people are passive and silent, some of them are hiding suspected memory offenders.

 

 

Ogawa's novel is lyrical and beautiful, endowed with a quiet and strangely subdued narrator's voice. The story is told by a young author whose parents, an ornithologist and an artist, have been ´taken away by the Memory Police, which also have searched, as well as destroyed specific items in her home. Her best friend and confidant is an old sea captain who lives on a rusting and unused ferry, anchored in the harbor. Together with him, the author has in her home hidden her publisher, who turned out to have an unfailing memory. Secluded in a confined space constructed by the captain, the publisher desperately tries to get the old man and the young author to preserve and cultivate their memories. A hopeless endeavour since they, apart from protecting and caring for the publisher, are obeying the absurd laws imparted by the Memory Police. Over the course of the story, poverty and boredom spread across the island, while the entire nature also seems to give up all resistance – snow falls and winter is not followed by spring. People are beraved of objects, comfort, self-confidence and memories while they all relentlessly move towards an all-encompassing emptiness – a total annihilation.

 

 

The Memory Police is neither long, nor difficult to read. A rare gem with subtle shifts and an exquisite surface evoking memories of Japanese woodcuts, Shindo's movies and Kawabata's nature descriptions. Under the surface of its apparent simplicity, the novel hides depths of thought that require reflection and re-reading.

 

My reading of Ogawa´s novel planted the seed to this blog entry and caused thoughts and associations to sprout. I have now presented some of them, though there is more to find and be inspired by in The Memory Police and I do of course recommend you to read it.

 

 

Aldiss, Brian (1982) Frankenstein Unbound. New York: HarperCollins. Ballard, J. G. (1997) Cocaine Nights. London: Fourth Estate. Ballard, J. G. (2001) Crash. London: Picador. Bauman, Zygmunt (2006) Liquid Times: Living in an Age of Uncertainty. Cambridge: Polity. Burke, Edmund (1998) A Philosophical Enquiry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Carrington, Leonora (2017) Down Below. New York: NYRB Classics. Chirico, Giorgio de (1992) Hebdomeros. Cambridge: Exact Change. Colapinto, John (2006) As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised As A Girl. New York: Harper Perennial. Ende, Michael (2009) Momo. London: Puffin Books. Flood, Alison (2011) ”Getting more from RR Martin,” The Guardian, 14 April. Gray, John (2003) Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. London: Granta Books. Kavan, Anna (1970) Ice. London: Picador. King, Stephen (2011) 11/22/63. New York: Scribner. Kubin, Alfred (2014) The Other Side. Sawtry: Daedalus. Martin, George R. R.(2009) A Game of Thrones. New York: Random House. Money, J. (1984) ”Paraphilias: Phenomenology and classification,” American Journal of Psychotherapy. No. 38 (2). Ogawa, Yoko (2020) The Memory Police. London: Vintage. Ross, Clifford (ed.) (1990) Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics. New York: Abrahams. Strindberg, August (2015) Son of a Servant. Amsterdam: Leopold Classic Library. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel (2014) On Fairy-stories. New York: HarperCollins. Tyler, Malone (2017) ”A Field of Strangeness: Anna Kavan´s Ice and the Merits of World Blocking,” Los Angeles Review of Books. Vesaas, Tarjei (2018) The Ice Palace. London: Penguin Modern classics. Yamada, Taichi (2003) Strangers. London: Faber & Faber.

 

 

 

11/27/2020 01:01

Det var i början av 2014 som jag började skriva min blogg. Jag arbetade då på en skola i Växjö, medan jag bodde hos min mor i Hässleholm. Jag hade för en tid lämnat min hustru i Rom, men åkte dit för jämnan. Att jag hamnat i Växjö berodde på att jag i Rom, som så ofta förr, inte hade något jobb och det gick långa tider mellan de få konsultuppdrag jag lyckades ro i hamn. Min mor var nittiotre år, kände sig ensam i sitt hus och blev allt skröpligare. Fast hon var fullkomligt klar i huvudet, med ett minne bättre än mitt.

 

Då vi i slutet av sommaren 2013 besökte Sverige antog jag att det kanske vore en god idé att för en tid arbeta som lärare. Det brukade i Sverige gå tämligen lätt för mig att få jobb som en sådan. Även om det gått flera år sedan jag arbetade som lärare kunde jag räkna med min lärarutbildning och hade under årens lopp samlat på mig en del undervisningserfarenhet. Jag sökte ett par gymnasiejobb i närheten av Hässleholm och fick napp i det närliggande Kristianstad. En vecka innan jag skulle börja arbeta ringde de dock och meddelade att de oväntat ”fått tag på en yngre förmåga som antagligen passade bättre för jobbet”. Jag reste då till Växjö, där jag fått ett erbjudande som jag avslagit eftersom Kristianstad var närmre. I Växjö visade det sig att de fortfarande ville ha mig som lärare i mina ämnen – svenska och religion, samt några lektioner i engelska. Jag tog jobbet, något som betydde att jag varje morgon tog tåget till Växjö, en timmes färd som gav mig tid att förbereda dagens lektioner och rätta skrivningar.

 

 

Det var en pittoresk skola, inrymd i Växjös före detta lokstallar. Kollegorna var trevliga och även eleverna, något som gjorde att jag trivdes alldeles utmärkt, samtidigt som det kändes betryggande att göra min åldrande mor sällskap under kvällarna. Det var under våren som min yngre syster, som känner min skrivklåda, föreslog mig att jag skulle skriva en blogg. Sedan dess har jag suttit fast i vanan.

 

På Smålandsgymnasiet, som i varje annan skola jag arbetat, skilde sig stämningen från klass till klass. Jag har ofta undrat varför det är på det viset. En av klasserna var sammansatt av förhoppningsfulla datatekniker. Jag upptäckte snart att ett par av dem var ivriga läsare av så kallad fantasylitteratur och samtidigt högst avancerade datorspelare. De visste allt om sådant jag knappt hört talas om, men likväl fann vara en fascinerande, om än obegriplig, värld. Jag är alldeles för gammal för sådant och kan svårligen föreställa mig att slösa tid på datorspel. Jag skrev dock ner namnen på de spel som mina elever rekommenderade och ivrigt berättade om. Jag antog att det möjligen ingår i nutidens allmänbildning att ha något hum om dem – Myst, Portal, The Secret of Monkey Island, Machinarium, Grim Fandango, The Cat Lady, Broken Sword, Bad Mojo, Amnesia.

 

 

Begrep inte hur mina elever kunde finna tid att leka med allt det där och likväl inte vara helt bortkomna då det gällde att tillgodogöra sig den utbildning jag försökte delge dem. Flera av dem var till min glädje ivriga romanläsare rekommenderade en mängd litteratur jag inte hört talas om. Då jag frågade dem vem de tyckte var den bäste fantasyförfattaren svarade de enhälligt – George R. R. Martin.

 

Visserligen hade HBO Nordic börjat visa Game of Thrones, men jag kände inte alls till den och det dröjde ytterligare ett par år innan jag följde Tv-serien. På biblioteket lånade jag första delen av Martins massiva bokserie Sagan om is och eld, men tyckte att Kampen om järntronen var lite väl tjock. Då jag läst ett par kapitel gav jag upp. Jag hade läst det där förr; ett svärd som hette Is, en fånig trubadur, ett högt beläget slott med trappor huggna ur klippan ”för branta till och med för åsnor”. Det var för mycket dialog för min smak, för många schablonmässiga uttryck, endimensionella karaktärer, antingen alltför onda, eller enfaldigt goda, en korkad prinsessa, en åldrad, försvagad kung, en skum arvtagare ...

 

 

 

Men då jag några år senare började följa Tv-serien antog jag att jag varit trångsynt och fördomfull Jag borde ha gett K. K. Martin en bättre chans. Tv-serien var nämligen inte alls förutsägbar och flera av karaktärerna var intressanta, ändrade sig och fördjupades under historiens lopp. Det var dynamiskt, spännande och oväntat.

 

 

Trots mina förutfattade meningar läste jag redan i Växjö en del om K. K. Martin, som såg ut som en New Age-mysgubbe. I The Guardian fann jag en intervju med författaren, som jag som nybliven bloggare med lätthet kunde identifiera mig med. George R. R. Martin påstod nämligen:

 

en del författare skriver klart sin bok och bryr sig egentligen inte om att den tagit tid att skriva eller om den någonsin kommer att bli publicerad. Och om den kommer ut får den ett par recensioner och säljer 12 exemplar.

 

En tämligen adekvat beskrivning av mitt författarskap. Sedan gav han en utmärkt redogörelse för hur jag går tillväga då jag skriver:

 

Jag antar att det finns två typer av författare, arkitekterna och trädgårdsmästarna. Arkitekterna planerar allt i förväg, som en arkitekt går tillväga då han konstruerar ett hus. De vet hur många rum som kommer att finnas i huset, vilken typ av tak det kommer att ha, var ledningarna skall dras, vilken typ av VVS som skall installeras. Innan den första spiken satts i den första brädan har de designat och ritat det hela. Trädgårdsmästarna däremot gräver ett hål, sår ett frö och vattnar det.

 

Som ”författare” tillhör jag trädgårdsmästarnas skrå. Jag vet inte hur mina bloggar eller romaner skall utveckla sig. Ser jag tillbaka på dem utgör de förvisso vildvuxna, oansade trädgårdar med alltför mycket törne och ogräs.

 

 

Frön till bloggen du läser är snö, is och besatthet – dess betydelse för en viss sorts litteratur som fascinerat mig under lång tid, något jag insåg efter att ha läst Yoko Ogawas roman Minnespolisen. Att jag plockade upp den boken beror på att min familj nästan dagligen klagar över mitt bristande minne, trots att jag själv inte märkt att det är sämre än tidigare. Likt många människor är jag allt som oftast tankspridd och glömmer var jag lagt saker och ting – nycklar, glasögon, gamla intyg och kvitton. Dock tror jag inte att det blivit mycket värre med åren.

 

 

Vad som däremot oroar mig, och även på den fronten inbillar jag mig att jag inte skiljer mig från de flesta män i min ålder, är att då jag tänker tillbaka på mitt liv upptäcker hur att stora block med händelser har fallit bort, försvunnit och lämnat gapande tomrum efter sig, eller än värre – ingenting. Tänker på det italienska uttrycket un buco nell´aqua, ett hål i vattnet. Som en droppe när den spårlöst försvinner i en vattensamling har inte enbart namnen på vänner och bekanta, utan även själva individerna och vårt samröre med varandra fullständigt försvunnit ur mitt minne. Samtidigt kan dock märkliga ”minnesblock” oväntat dyka upp till ytan av mitt medvetande.

 

 

För mig utgör en del romaner sådana ”minnesblock”. I min bokhylla kan jag kasta blicken på en bok och plötsligt minnas då jag köpte och läste den. Efter att ha läst Ogawas Minnespolis tog jag fram Brian Aldiss, Frankenstein Unbound, Frankenstein i frihet. Den handlar nämligen om ”tidsblock”, hur förfluten tid tränger sig in i våra liv och förändrar dem, samtidigt som vi genom att manipulera det förgångna kan förändra framtiden.

 

Jag läste Aldiss roman någon gång vid mitten av sjuttiotalet. Som så ofta är fallet fascinerades jag av bokomslaget, kanske på samma sätt som jag kan köpa en flaska vin för att etiketten tilltalar mig. Jag antog att titeln anspelade på en tämligen oläslig pjäs av Percy Bysshe Shellley, Prometheus Unbound, som dykt upp under en litteraturhistorielektion. Skulle tro att det var i samband med en föreläsning om August Strindberg, revoltören mot allt och alla som uppenbarligen, likt Shelley, låtit sig inspireras, både politiskt och personligt, av den mytologiske titanen och upprorsmannen Prometheus, som satt sig upp mot den diktatur som tillämpades av Olympens gudar och därför straffats på ett bestialiskt sätt – Han kedjades vid en klippa i Kaukasus där en gam ständigt hackar i hans lever, vilken dock växer ut igen. I sin självbiografi Tjänstekvinnans son skrev Strindberg:

 

Det är ganska fysiologiskt riktigt att den antike skalden låter Prometheus gnagas i levern av gamen. Prometheus var revoltören som ville ge mänskorna upplysning […] han blev säkerligen gallsprängd av att se världen vara ett dårhus där fånarne gingo lösa och bevakade den ende kloke såsom en livsfarlig. Sjukdomar kunna färga människans åskådningar och var och en vet huru mörka alla tankar bli när man ansättes av en feber.

 

 

Frankensten Unbound, skriven 1974, berättar Aldiss hur vetenskapsmannen Joe Bodenland någon gång under 2020 med sin bil far rakt in i ett tidsgap, ett begrepp som antagligen borde förklaras mer ingående. Ett världskrig hade skapat katastrofala förhållanden. Stridande stormakter hade insett att kärnvapenkrigföring på jorden skulle få ödesdigra följder för samtliga stridande, därför hade man utvecklat Space Forces, Rymdstyrkor. Den väpnade maktkampen förlades därmed till rymden, bortom jorden och därute ägnade sig de politiska maktsfärerna åt ett hämningslöst kärnvapenkrigande.

 

Då fred åter etablerats hade obotliga skador inte gjort planeten Jorden till en obeboelig värld, men en oförutsägbar sådan. Utvecklingen hade fortgått och skapat en högteknologisk kultur med en bibehållen biosfär, men de avlägsna kärnvapenkrigen hade ruckat tids-rum balansen. Detta innebar att vissa av jordens individer som vid ett slumpmässigt tillfälle befann sig på en viss plats kunde hjälplöst slungas in i en annan tidsdimension. Ett sådant tillstånd kunde pågå en längre eller kortare tid, tills dess tidsskalan korrigerat sig själv och återställt den drabbade individen till rätt tid och plats.

 

 

 

Det var vad som drabbat Joe Bodenland. Med sin bil hade han slungats genom tids-rum rymden till det tidiga 1800-talets Schweiz. Där möter han Victor Frankenstein. Det visar sig att hans monster faktiskt existerar och det gör också Mary Shelley, författarinnan som skrivit  historien om Frankensteins monster. 

 

När Joe Bodenland 1816 träffar Mary Shelley, hette hon fortfarande Mary Godwin och hade då varken skrivit sin berömda roman Frankenstein: eller den moderne Prometeus, eller gift sig med Percy Bysshe Shelley som 1820, två år efter det att Frankenstein publicerats, skrev sin Prometheus Unbound. Då Bodenland träffar dem bor Percy Shelley och Mary Godwin tillsammans med Lord Byron i en villa vid Genèvesjön.

 

 

Joe Bodenland inser att skapandet av Frankensteins monster är inledningen till en katastrofal utveckling som kommer att leda till ett manipulerande av människans arvsmassa och få lika förödande konsekvenser som de som framställandet av den första atombomben orsakade. Aldiss roman blandar vilt litteratur- och vetenskapshistoria och i sin galna roman ställer han väsentliga frågor kring vetenskapsmännens ansvar och den skapande fantasins roll då det gäller att göra människor medvetna om sin existens och sitt ansvar för utvecklingen. Något som möjligen kan vara svårt att lägga märke till under ytan av en rafflande äventyrshistoria som bygger på såväl Mary Shelleys roman, som på allsköns science fiction berättelser och action filmer, exempelvis James Bondfilmer.

 

 

Aldiss monster har fler drag av Mary Shelleys ursprungliga skapelse än William Wylers berömda version av den. Därmed inte sagt att Aldiss även har inspirerats av Boris Karloffs monsterframställning. Aldiss gestaltning av monstret sammanfaller med såväl romanens som filmens beskrivning av en varelse som inte vet vad den skall göra efter sitt uppvaknande som en monstruös varelse och därför beter sig som ett barn kan göra; slår tanklöst mot sådant det inte begriper, samtidigt som det ställer besvärliga frågor och orimliga krav. Men liksom i Shelleys roman är monstret hos Aldiss även ett känsligt väsen vars främsta strävan är att få dela sitt liv med en varelse som tänker och känner som han. Monstret blir dock fruktat och bortstött och då han konfronteras med sin spegelbild begriper han varför andra känner avsky inför hans blotta uppenbarelse. I romanen är monstret både vältaligt och talfört, inom elva månader efter sin skapelse hade han lärt han sig tala både tyska och franska. Men då han inser vad hans skapare, Dr Frankenstein gjort, svär det förtvivlade monstret på att krossa och utplåna honom.

 

 

Inspirationen från Bondfilmer är i Aldiss roman speciellt påtaglig genom Joe Bodenlands bil, som följer honom till Genèvesjöns strand och imponerar på såväl den unga Mary Godwin som vetenskapsmannen Victor Frankenstein. Den använder inte fossila bränslen, är försedd med såväl GPS, bildskärm, mobiltelefon och en allvetande funktion inte olik, fast mer sofistikerad, än nutidens Siri. Likt en Bondbil är den även försedd med sofistikerade vapen. Sådana detaljer gör att Aldiss roman faktiskt fungerar som trovärdig science fiction. Joe Bodenlands bil är tämligen förbluffande med tanke på att den 2020 faktiskt inte framstår lika föråldrad som så mycken annan science fiction från anno dazumal.

 

 

Galenskapen är onekligen närvarande i Aldiss roman, men snön och isen som jag ovan nämnde som frön till den här bloggen – är även de närvarande? Förvisso, såväl Shelleys som Aldiss roman avslutas med en jakt på monstret över öde snövidder. Hos Shelley äger den rum i outforskade polartrakter, hos Aldiss inom ett tidsgap i en avlägsen framtid där Joe Bodenlands omgivning tycks falla sönder i en ödelagd värld skapad genom hans egna handlingar i ett avlägset förflutet

 

Därigenom påminner Aldiss Frankenstein Unbound om Stephen Kings märkliga och imponerande tidsreseroman 11/22/63 där en man reser tillbaka i tiden och lyckas hindra Lee Harvey Oswald från att mörda John F. Kennedy, enbart för att finna att hans heroiska handling i framtiden får än mer katastrofala följder än han någonsin hade kunnat förvänta sig.

 

 

Det är tveksamt om Anna Kavans Is kan kallas för en science fiction roman. Den utspelar sig i en parallell verklighet som möjligen kan vara förlagd till framtiden, men det är osäkert. Den tycks heller inte skildra en förfluten, avlägsen tid. I romanen finns bilar, tåg, flyg och grammofoner, men plötsligt kan läsaren finna sig i en blodig plundring av en stad där svärdsbeväpnade och bepansrade ryttare massakrerar invånarna. Eller en nordisk ruinstad där en jungfru offras till en drake som bor på botten av en fjord. Jag köpte romanen samtidigt som Brian Aldiss Frankenstein Unbound och då jag nu läser den finner jag till min förvåning att Aldiss har skrivit förordet i vilket han beskriver Anna Kavan som en författarinna som hos Kafka funnit en teknik hon använt sig av för att skildra en samtid hon uppfattade som ytterst hotfull.

 

 

Kavans roman tycks utspela sig under den osäkra freden efter ett förödande stormaktskrig. Städer ligger i ruiner och beväpnade soldater kontrollerar medborgarna, begär dokument och kontrollerar om utegångsförbud följs. Vi tycks befinna oss i ett land behärskat av en totalitär regim. I romanens inledning besöker berättaren, en uppenbarligen förmögen författare, en bekant som är konstnär och gift med en bräcklig, eterisk och skir kvinna som tidigare tycks ha haft ett förhållande med författaren. Hennes make, konstnären, behandlar sin undflyende och känsliga hustru illa och hon försvinner. Makens likgiltighet och demoniska personlighet får författaren att misstänka att han mördat sin hustru. Hans efterforskningar spårar henne dock till en avlägsen kuststad i ett land som kan påminna om Norge. Där hålls hon fånge av the Warden, Uppsyningsmannen, en krigsherre som omgiven en välbeväpnad privatarmé bor i ett luxuöst palats i en ruinstad, vars misstänksamma och brutala invånare ger intryck av att befinna sig på en medeltida nivå. Det hela får mig osökt att tänka på The Game of Thrones , inte minst med tanke på att det utanför staden finns en jättelik mur och landet, kanske även världen i övrigt, hotas av en inlandsis som obevekligt närmar sig.

 

 

The Game of Thrones skyddas Westeros sydliga länder av en väldig mur som reser sig mot de nordliga snövidder från vilka isvålnader närmar sig för att lägga under sig Westeros och utplåna dess stridande klaner. Hotet uttrycks i mottot för Huset Stark, Westeros nordliga murväktare: ”Winter is Coming, Vinter är på väg”. Skulle inte tro att K.K. Martin inspirerats av Anna Kavans Is, men säkerligen av den norrröna mytologins Fimbulvinter, den vinter som oavbrutet kommer att råda under tre års innan Ragnarök äger rum – Världens undergång.

 

Den vittberesta Anna Kavan hade säkerligen haft Norden i tankarna då hon skrev Is, men var antagligen främst inspirerad av de två år som hon under Andra världskriget tillbringade i Nya Zeeland, oroad av krigshändelserna i norr och känslan av närhet till Antarktis ismassor i söder. Trots skildringarna av ett hotfullt, märkligt landskap är det inte det, utan inre känslotillstånd som Kavan tycks vilja skildra och projicera på karaktärernas omgivningar Perspektiv förskjuts ständigt – från det intima, till det vidsträckta. Berättaren tycks efterhand alltmer uppgå i den brutale Wardens gestalt alltmedan den bleka kvinnan beständigt framställs som ett undflyende, men plågat offer. Anna Kavan har hos flera läsare kommit att framstå som en ”feministisk” ikon och hennes roman har tolkats som en kommentar till hur ett globalt, politiskt våld och en hotande miljöförstöring kan kopplas till en skrämmande ”erotisk objektifiering” av kvinnor och förvandlat dem till offer inom ett självförtärande, känslokallt kollektiv.

 

 

Jag tror inte att Anna Kavan läste den norske författaren Tarjei Vesaas roman Isslottet som skrevs 1963, men publicerades på engelska 1966, året innan hennes Is kom utOmöjligt är det dock inte eftersom Vesaas roman kom ut på samma förlag som hennes romaner – Peter Owen. Även Vesaas roman behandlar alienation och kyla utifrån ett kvinnligt perspektiv, men är trots sina symbolistiska undertoner strikt realistisk.

 

I en isolerad norsk by blir den livliga, elvaåriga Siss (Sissela) god vän med den undandragna och lite udda Unn. Då flickorna under den första dagen av sin bekantskap leker ensamma tillsammans finner de sig märkligt dragna till varandra. Den utåtriktade, ledargestalten Siss upptäcker något av sig själv i den allvarliga, plågade Unn, och tvärtom.

 

Unn blir som förtrollad av den öppna, skrattande Siss och lyckas övertala henne att de skall klä av sig nakna. Då de står nakna inför varandra undrar Unn om Siss kan se någon skillnad mellan dem. Då Siss svarar att hon inte kan det, förklarar Unn att hon vet att det är något som inte stämmer med henne. Att hon är rädd för att efter sin död inte få tillträde till himlen. Hon anklagar sig själv för att hennes mor dött sex månader tidigare och hon vet inte vem hennes far är.

 

 

När de klätt på sig igen känner Siss sig besvärad, orolig och rädd. Hon flyr hem i mörkret, men ligger liksom Unn sömnlös under natten. Dagen efter kan Unn inte förmå sig att komma till skolan för att där konfrontera sig med sin nyfunna vän. Istället söker hon till isslottet, väldiga isformationer som under hårda nordiska vintrar bildas av fruset vatten kring stora vattenfall. Driven av barnets drift att testa och utmana sig själv tar sig Unn in i is-salarna. Betagen av isgrottornas mystiska och förgängliga skönhet försjunker hon i tankar om sig själv och Siss. Unn förirrar sig slutligen i det kyliga mörkret, trampar genom isen och drunknar.

 

Folk i byn tror att Siss vet mer om Unns försvinnande än hon låter påskina och tyngd av skuld och sorg tar Siss på sig Unns roll som utanförstående och blir en ensling såväl i hemmet som skolan. Isslottet är en förrädiskt enkel, men sparsmakad och samtidigt lyrisk, berättelse som under sin skenbart realistiskt yta gömmer bråddjup. Den får mig att tänka på mästerliga japanska haiku där naturscenerier och stämningar inom ett strängt begränsat utrymme samverkar för att skapa bilder av inre känslolägen.

 

 

Romaner som Isslottet, och även i viss mån Is, och givetvis Kafkas verk, är skrivna på ett rakt, uppenbart realistiskt sätt som vaggar in läsaren i en värld som samtidigt är galen och förnuftig. Sådana litterära verk speglar vad J. R. R. Tolkien en gång skrev om sagor ”ju skarpare och klarare förnuftet är, desto bättre fantasier skapar det.” Vad Tolkien tycks mena är att sagor och fantastiska , liksom drömmar, kräver inre logik och klarhet. En realism som inom sina bestämda ramar blir till något helt annat – drömmar som avslöjar vad vår existens verkligen innebär.

 

Jag funderade på detta då jag igår såg Jan Švankmajers film Alice, som min äldsta dotter sänt mig från Prag. För några år sedan såg vi tillsammans en utställning med Švankmajers kusliga, men samtidigt humoristiska ”skulpturer”, en slags collage av uppstoppade djur och skelettdelar.

 

 

 De påminde om de kuriosakabinett som under Barocken var populära vid europeiska furstehov. Inte minst hos Rudolph II, den ytterst excentriske kejsaren för det tysk-romerska riket som höll till på kungaborgen Pražský hrad i Prag, där han kring sig samlade alkemister, magiker, originella konstnärer och geniala vetenskapsmän. En med åren tilltagande sinnessjukdom hindrade Rudolph från leda ett imperium som föll samman under pressen från religiösa reformationer och slutligen besegrades han av sin mentalsjukdom, tvingades abdikera och överlämna kejsarvärdigheten till sin bror och dog slutligen som en galen enstöring.

 

 

Švankmajers Alice heter egentligen Nĕco z Alenky, Något om Alice, och är en fri tolkning av Lewis Carrols Alice i Underlandet, en bok jag läst flera gånger, alltid lika förbluffad hur någon förmått skildra ett barns drömvärld. Švankmajers film är en så kallad stop motion animation, befolkad av en livslevande Alice som rör sig bland hans groteska skapelser; kusliga malätna dockor och bisarra djur inom nergångna och sönderfallande rum och hyreskaserner. Ett skräckinjagande, fantasirikt och, likt Kafkas berättelser, märkligt humoristiskt universum.

Just så skall Alice i Underlandet skildras. Inte relativt slaviskt, som i Disney gjorde i sin i och för sig geniala tolkning, eller fullkomligt påhittat eller löjligt förenklat som i Tim Burtons katastrofala version, som är en av mitt flitiga biobesökandes största besvikelser – jag hade av honom väntat mig något betydligt bättre än en pastellfärgad, fjantig version om kampen för att rädda Wonderland. Usch!

 

 

Till skillnad från Burton skapade Švankmajer ett mästerverk – en parallellvärld till Carolls Underland, även den sedd genom ett barns ögon, tolkad med ett barns förundran, frimodighet och oro. En dröm bortom gott och ont, bortom de vuxnas förnumstiga pekpinnevärld och istället präglad av ett barns snedvridna, men samtidigt djupt personliga och därmed sanna föreställningsvärld.

 

En abnormitet som även präglar den värld som Anna Kavan skildrar i sin roman. Hennes ursprungliga namn var Helen Emily Woods och hon var det enda, ensamma och i stort sett ignorerade barnet i en dysfunktionell familj. Då hon var elva år tog hennes far livet av sig och som nittonåring övertygade hennes mor henne att gifta sig med sin egen avlagda älskare. Han gjorde Anna med barn och tog med sig henne till Burma, där han arbetade som järnvägsingenjör, de skildes åt efter tre år.

 

 

Då Helen Woods tog sig namnet Anna Kavan och fullkomligt förändrade sin tillvaro var det enbart ett av flera uppbrott under ett kringflackande liv. Under tjugotalet levde hon bland racerförare på Rivieran och grundlade där ett livslångt heroinberoende, som inte lindrades under hennes senare liv inom olika konstnärskretsar. Anna åkte ut och in mellan olika mentalkliniker och förmådde inte befria sig från ett allvarligt drogberoende, som slutligen blev en bidragande orsak till hennes död 1968.

 

 

Vid sidan om sitt författarskap, var Anna Kavan en begåvad konstnär vars konst ofta speglar hennes uppdiktade världar, med dess poetiska skönhet och kusliga suggestionskraft. Att vara såväl konstnär som författarinna delar hon exempelvis med Leonora Carrington vars drömbok Down Below, Där nere, likt flera av Anna Kavans litterära verk skildrar en galen, förvriden verklighet. Carrington skrev Down Below under en djup kris, då hon som så ofta varit fallet med Kavan, satt inspärrad på ett mentalsjukhus.

 

Carringtons konst får mig att associera till Tove Jansson, som förvisso inte alls var galen, men liksom Kavan och Carrington förmådde skapa en parallellvärld av såväl lyrik och skönhet, som hotande mystik och fara. 


 

Hotfullheten som för det mesta lurar i Tove Jansson böcker mildras av värmen och den intima tryggheten inom den godmodigt generösa och lekfullt fantasirika Muminfamiljen. 

Tove Janssons pittoreska Mumindal med dess omgivande mörka berg och skogar är en unik värld precis som landskapen i Michael Endes roman Momo eller kampen om tiden, fast i hans fall är omgivningarna mer än hos Jansson kopplade till en reell verklighet – Italien där tysken Ende under större delen av sitt liv hade sitt hem. Även Ende var en skrivande konstnär. I Momo, liksom i Kavans Is, hotas världen av en själsdödande kyla. Hos Momo är det gråa män i tjänst hos kommersialism och likriktande totalitarism som stjäl tid och därmed dödar fantasi och skaparkraft.

 

 

Två av mina andra favoritromaner är även de skrivna av bilkonstnärer – Alfred Kubins Den andra sidan och Giorgio de Chiricos Hebdomeros. Kubins roman är en mörk fabel om en stad som sakta förfaller i takt med en despots fysiska försämring och moraliska fördärv. Stadens modernitet som kombineras med uråldriga, fallfärdiga kvarter och underjordiska tunnlar fick mig att tänka på Prag. Det allmänna sönderfallet under en alltmer galen härskare kan möjligen sammanställas med tillståndet som rådde under Rudolph II, men kanske även oron som rådde inom det Österikisk-Ungerska kejsardömet innan det Första världskrigets utbrott, romanen skrevs 1908. Kubin kände Kafka och var en flitig pragbesökare. Kubins mörka och hotfulla värld är inte helt olikt Ana Kavans isvärld, fast historien utspelar sig i ett mer tropiskt klimat.

 

 

Trots sin bildrikedom och filmatiska scenerier har Den andra sidan en mer eller mindre fast berättarstruktur. de Chiricos Hebdomeros liknar däremot Kavans Is i den meningen att den italienske konstnärens roman framstår som ett slags bildcollage, utan ett klart händelseförlopp. Hebdomeros har än mer tvära kast mellan scenerier, bilder och episoder än Kavans Is, men den är också i min mening mer lyrisk och målerisk. Hebdomeros skrevs 1929, men kom då ut i en liten upplaga och förblev så gott som okänd fram till 1964, då den uppmärksammades som kanske den främsta ”surrealistiska” roman som skrivits. Detta trots att Chirico inte betraktade sig som ”surrealist” och dessutom på senare år inte ville kännas vid sin roman, som han skrev på franska. Även det en märklig bedrift med tanke på att Chirico med ett annat modersmål likväl förmådde skriva en så lyrisk och bildrik franska.

 

 

Det går inte att ta miste på att Hebdomeros fångar stämningarna i Chiricos tavlor, emellanåt genomlysta av Medelhavets värme och ljus, men också förlänad med dess mörkare undertoner. Hebdomeros ger som tavlorna intryck att vara förankrade i en mångtusenårig tradition av konst och estetik. Ett landskap som med sina klassiska allusioner likväl integrerar moderna element som tåg och fabriksskorstenar.

 

De romaner jag nämnt kan antagligen samlas under rubriken Slipstream, en litterär term som 1989 introducerades av den amerikanske, science fiction författaren Bruce Sterling, i ett försök att kategorisera litterära verk som förde in icke-realistiska inslag – som sagor, science fiction, drömmar, fantasy och surrealism – i skildringar som i övrigt framstod som realistiska och dessutom utspelade sig i nutida/samtida miljöer.  

 

Slipstream är i själva verket ett aerodynamiskt begrepp, som används inom motor- och cykelsport. Om ett fordon färdas i hög hastighet skapas bakom det ett undertryck som i sin tur ger upphov till lägre luftmotstånd. Ett fordon som befinner sig precis bakom ett annat fordon i hög hastighet kan dra nytta av det där luftsuget och i en ökad hastighet köra om det framförliggande färdmedlet – i allmänhet en cykel eller en bil.

 

 

Sterling, som i sitt författarskap ofta använder sig av tämligen egendomliga associationer och nyskapade ord, tycks mena att en berättelseström, exempelvis realism, ger kraft åt en annan berättargenre, exempelvis fantasy, och glider in, slips in, i den och därmed får den andra genren en skjuts framåt och förmår därmed överglänsa den berättarkonst som den dragit nytta av. Sterling beskrev känslan som uppkommer då du läser en slipstreamberättelse:

 

den får dig helt enkelt att känna dig mycket underlig; på ett sätt som påminner dig om hur det är att leva i det tjugoförsta seklet, om du nu är en person förlänad med en speciell känslighet.

 

Slipstreambegreppet antyder rörelse och kan därmed kopplas till modernism i den meningen att den utgör en kommenterar till en komplicerad verklighet; ett ”nu” som vi alla befinner oss i. Slipstreamförfattaren och den värld hen skapar uppkommer genom att hen är en främling i sin tid och därmed betraktar vår tillvaro utifrån sitt utanförskap. Sådana författares skapelser förvandlas till en parallellvärld; en trollspegel som både förvränger och avslöjar vilka vi verkligen är. Som då Frankensteins monster genom att betrakta sin spegelbild drabbas av den plågsamma insikten att han är ett missfoster, en styggelse.

 

 

I vår moderna värld är vi kringskurna av ett tillstånd statt i ständig förändring och därmed blir också den litteratur som skapas av slipstreamförfattare ”flytande”, såväl anpassningsbar som föränderlig. Likt myter och drömmar öppnar den sig ständigt för nya tolkningar.

 

Sociologen Zygmunt Bauman som ägnat en mängd böcker åt ”främlingen” och ”främlingskapet” sammanställer ofta ”konst” med liquidity, ett flytande tillstånd. Enligt honom är liquidity i stort sett det samma som obeständighet, ett tillstånd som blivit dominerande inom vår nuvarande existens och helt naturligt har samtidskonsten anpassat sig till det.

 

Jag tolkar Baumans argument som att vi söker efter insikter som ytterst visar sig vara präglade av ständig tillblivelse. Ett tillstånd av rörelse, förändring och skapande. I grund och botten strävar vi alltså inte alls efter något mål. Vår längtan, våra handlingar och önskemål har kommit att begränsas av åtrå, lust och begär. Syftet, målet och meningen med vår existens har därmed förlorats ur sikte. Vår värsta farhåga är nu möjligheten att verkligen uppnå full tillfredsställelse – Frälsning.

 

 

Sann konst kan möjligen bidra till att förvandla något som är såväl kortvarigt som kortsiktigt till något som är evigt och beständigt. Inom vår likformade, globala tillvaro hyllas märkligt nog individualism och egenrättfärdighet på bekostnad av etablerade, moraliska värden, exempelvis i form av samverkan för att respektera mänskliga rättigheter och bevara jordens naturresurser. Vi ger oss varken tid eller utrymme att förverkliga något som skulle kunna gynna oss alla, utan rusar istället runt i våra högst personliga och narcissistiskt präglade ekorrhjul. Slipstreamlitteraturen ställer sig dock vid sidan om spektaklet och genom sitt alternativa synsätt visar den oss hur absurd vår tillvaro i själva verket är.

 

 

Högteknologin har med rasande fart förändrat vårt samhälle – mobiler och telefoner kopplar ihop människor, men samtidigt tycks det som om alltfler av oss har förlorat kontakt med verkligheten. Genom att den fysiska närheten till andra människor har minskats blir även konsekvenserna av vårt handlande allt diffusare.

 

Vi kan numera döda våra medmänniskor med en drone. Har vi frågor och klagomål hänvisas vi till webbsidor och digitaliserade röster. Tekniken har även gjort sin entré inom våra mest intima sfärer. En möjlig konsekvens av ett samlag behöver inte längre vara födseln av ett barn. Sådana kan nu för ett pris tillhandahållas genom spermabanker, eller surrogatmammor. Sexuell samvaro har förvandlats från att vara ett bevis på djup, intim samvaro mellan två människor som verkligen älskar varandra och därigenom är beredda att ta ett gemensamt ansvar för följderna av sitt förhållande. Dessvärre har i dessa moderna tider sexualitet förvandlats till ännu en vara, en föreställning, en mekanisk akt enbart inriktad på fysisk tillfredsställelse. Visst det går det att påpeka att så har det alltid varit inom vissa sfärer av mänsklig samvaro – prostitution har alltid funnits inom mänskliga samhällen.

 

Visst, men nu har tekniken förändrat även de omständigheterna. Då teknologin minskar risker och konsekvenser söker sig nu människor till surrogat för sådant som tidigare engagerade, skrämde och upprörde oss. Allt sådant som Edmund Burke vid mitten av sjuttonhundratalet benämnde det subtila, det vill säga något som är motsatt till intimitet och trygghet, sådant som lugnar våra nerver. Det subtila spänner däremot nerverna, skrämmer och hetsar oss, men gör i gengäld tillvaron mer oförutsägbar och spännande.

 

 

Ersättningar för tidigare starka emotioner är inte alltid begränsade till digitala upplevelser, utan även teknologiskt underbyggda risktaganden som bungee jumping, fallskärmshoppning, bergsklättring o.dyl. Det främsta teknologiska surrogatet för adrenalinhöjning är möjligen fortfarande bilåkning, helst i lyxiga fordon och i hög hastighet. Ett nöje som i kommersiella syften ofta kopplas samman med sex. Ett lyxigt fordon lockar till dig sexuella partners och förhöjer din prestige:

 

 

En bekväm, vacker bil kan även omsluta dig med en mildrande komfort, förläna en känsla av välbefinnande och självsäkerhet, som i Bruce Springsteens Pink Cadillac:

 

I love you for your pink Cadillac.

Crushed velvet seats.

Riding in the back.

Oozing down the street.

Waving to the girls.

Feeling out of sight.

Spending all my money

On a Saturday night.

 

Jag älskar dig för din rosa Cadillac.

Mjuka sammetssäten.

Färdas i baksätet

Sipprande nerför gatan.

Vinkande åt flickorna.

Känna mig utom synhåll.

Spendera alla mina pengar

under en lördagskväll.

 

 

En mängd amerikanska sånger besjunger friheten i att ge sig hän åt Open Higways, Öppna motorvägar, på väg mot en okänd frihet. Det hindrar dock inte att det kan röra sig om en färd blandad med oro, kanske skräck. Springsteen igen – Stolen car:

 

And I’m driving a stolen car
On a pitch black night
And I’m telling myself I’m gonna be alright
But I ride by night and I travel in fear
That in this darkness I will disappear

 

Och jag kör en stulen bil

genom en becksvart natt

och jag säger mig själv: Du kommer att klara det.

Men, jag kör om natten och färdas i fruktan

över att jag skall försvinna i detta mörker.

 

Betrakta sekvensen från Hitchcocks Psycho med Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), som efter att ha stulit 40 000 dollar från sin arbetsgivare, till tonerna av Bernard Herrmans suggestiva musik, i sin bil genom en mörknande natt färdas mot sin död på Bates Motel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSlo44VO-lE&ab_channel=scaringeachother

 

 

Att någon sitter bakom ratten på en bil är för övrigt en av amerikansk films vanligaste screen shots. I USA tycks det som om bilen för många har blivit en integrerad av deras personlighet. En vän bosatt i USA sa mig en gång att han skulle satsa sina surt förvärvade slantar på en ny, lyxig bil, detta trots att han egentligen inte alls hade råd med det. Då jag undrade varför han gjorde en så korkad investering, en bil förlorar i värde redan då man kör den hem från bilhandlaren, svarade han: ”Jag måste kunna se mina barn i ögonen. Jag vill inte att de skall skämmas över att ha en loser till far. En usling som inte ens har råd med den ordentlig bil.”

 

Minns hur jag då jag besökte en av mina svägerskor i Miami fann att det i hennes villakvarter inte fanns några trottoarer och hur jag under mina promenader kände hur hennes grannar misstänksamt följde mig med blickarna, där de ruvade bakom sina gardiner eller klippte sina redan välansade gräsmattor. En fotgängare! Det måste röra sig om en skum individ, även om han är vit och relativt anständigt klädd.

 

Stephen King är en författare som väl motsvarar slipstreambegreppet Jag känner få författare som från en alldaglig realism kring The American Way kan skapa skräck utifrån alla de gadgets som omger landets invånare; mobiltelefoner, datamaskiner, gräsklippare, krocketklubbor, matberedningsmaskiner, ugnar och givetvis – bilar. På ett ögonblick kan hans karaktärer tvingas uppleva hur deras trygga tillvaro förvandlas till ett obegripligt och oförutsägbart helvete där de tvingas stå öga mot öga med demoniska krafter i något som kan tyckas vara ett parallellt universum.

 

 

Hos King är bilar emellanåt dödsmaskiner som besätter sina ägare, som en Plymouth Fury Christine, en Buick Roadmaster From a Buick 8, eller en Mercedes Benz Mr. Mercedes, för att inte tala om de galna lastbilarna i Kings egenhändigt regisserade kalkonfilm Maximum Overdrive.

 

 

Kanske är det sammanblandningen av frihet, sex, bilar och död som i USA givit upphov till en subgenre av actionfotografering – bilolycksbilder. Med mästare som Artur Fellig (Weegee):

 

 

Och mexikanen Enrique Metinides:

 

 

Även Andy Warhol, som med sitt stora intresse för kommersialism, känslokyla, sex och död möjligen kan betraktas urtypen för Zygmunt Baumans ”utanför stående” konstnär, ägnade en mängd konstverk åt bilolyckor.

 

 

Warhol var också fascinerad av kändisskap och dess roll för glamour och kommersialism, något som även det har färgat av sig på kulten kring bilar och bilolyckor, med offer som James Dean – ”lev hårt och dö ung”.

 

 

Eller Jackson Pollock, kanske även han kan betraktas som en Slipstreamer:

 

För mig tycks det som om den moderna målaren inte kan uttrycka den här tidsåldern, flygplanet, atombomben, radion, i renässansens formspråk, eller med uttryck lånade från någon annan, tidigare kultur. Varje ålder hittar sin egen teknik. [...] Enligt min uppfattning arbetar den moderne konstnären med, och speglar en inre värld – med andra ord ... han uttrycker energi, rörelse och andra inre krafter.

 

 

När teknologin väl gjort sitt inträde i den mänskliga sfären; från eld och hjul till tryckpressar, tåg, radio, flyg, TV, Intranät, sofistikerade vapen och … bilar, förändras allas vår tillvaro i en omfattning som är svår att omfatta och redogöra för. Bilar uppfanns som ett fortskaffningsmedel, men som vi sett ovan har de blivit så mycket mer, bland annat en inkarnation för våra mer eller mindre dolda begär. Om vi varit bättre intellektuellt utvecklade, mer moraliskt inriktade, kanske vi hade kunnat utnyttja vår sofistikerade teknologi för bättre ändamål. Nu tycks den istället hota oss, som om vi i hög hastighet färdades i en bil mot en slutgiltig olycka, en krasch. Felet finns inte hos våra redskap, det vilar inom oss.

 

Då jag skriver detta kommer jag att tänka på att Bruce Sterling är en stor beundrare av James Graham Ballard och har nämnt honom som en utmärkt föregångare för samtida Slipstream författare. För några år sedan rotade jag min vana trogen bland böckerna på ett bord i FAOs foyer där folk brukar placera begagnade böcker och fann där J.G. Ballards roman Crash. Jag kände enbart författaren som skaparen av Solens rike som låg till grund för Spielbergs film med samma namn och erinrade mig vagt att den otäcke, men likväl skicklige och fascinerande David Cronenberg hade gjort en film med samma namn som romanen jag höll i min hand.

 

 

Det visade sig att mitt antagande varit riktigt, men jag har sällan läst en så otäck, ja … äcklig roman som Ballards Crash. Eftersom jag nu inte kan finna den någonstans bland mina böcker befarar jag att jag har slängt den och börjar anse att om så varit fallet var det antagligen ganska dumt gjort. Även om det gått flera år sedan jag läste Crash har den stannat i minnet och då inte som en perverterad avart utan faktiskt som en intressant skildring av vår samtids vansinne och dess sammanblandning av kropp, psyke, sex, dödsdrift och högteknologi. Att jag började leta efter hans bok beror på att Ballard alltmer kommit att hyllas som en outsider som tidigt insett och kunnat formulera vart vårt samhälle är på väg. I en av sina romaner, Cocaine Nights, konstaterade han:

 

Konsumtionssamhället hungrar efter sådant som är avvikande och oväntat. Vad skulle det annars vara som driver de alltmer bisarra infallen inom en underhållningsindustri som får oss att inhandla och konsumera alltmer? […] Det finns inte mycket kvar som förmår att väcka och egga människor … möjligen brott, ytterligheter och aggressivitet – med vilket jag inte menar något som är direkt illegalt, utan sådant som gynnar vår jakt efter upplevelser som förmår stimulera vårt nervsystem, få pulsen att slå hårdare, få synapser som dövats av inaktivitet att elektrifieras.

 

 

Det sjukdomstillstånd som Ballards Crash handlar om har ett namn – symphorofilia, från grekiskan symphora, olycka, och innebär att den drabbade blir sexuellt upphetsad genom att arrangera eller bevittna en våldsam tragedi, exempelvis en bilolycka. Termen skapades faktiskt tjugo år efter det att Ballards bok kommit ut. John William Money (1921-2006) identifierade åkomman som en extrem form av parahphilia, det vill säga ett sjukligt begär efter sexuell stimulans från föremål eller varelser som hos normala personer i allmänhet inte väcker perverterade begär och leder till moraliskt förkastliga handlingar.

 

Inom parentes sagt var Money, som var professor i pediatrik och medicinsk psykologi vid det ansedda John Hopkins University i Baltimore, även han ett offer för teknologins inverkan på fixa idéer. John Money var världsberömd expert på sexuell identitet och könsroller, med intersexualism, eller s.k. transgender, som sin specialitetHans betydelse för genusforskning har blivit epokgörande, bland annat genom att introducera termer som gender identity, genusidentitet, genus role, genusroll och sexual orientation, sexuell orientering.

 

 

Som specialist på ”könsidentitet” rekommenderade Money emellanåt kirurgiska ingrepp och hormonbehandlingar för att åstadkomma genomgripande könsbyten, på såväl barn, som unga män och kvinnor. Något som för flera av hans patienter fick katastrofala följder då de vuxit upp och funnit att deras svävande könsidentitet enbart varit en del av en psykologisk mognadsprocess. Denna del av Moneys verksamhet resulterade i en upprörande bok av journalisten John Colapinto som sätter fingret på medicinsk arrogans och missriktad vetenskap – As Nature Made Him.

 

Som en försmak till vansinnet i Crash och i efterföljd av Andy Warhol organiserade Ballard 1970 en utställning med bilder på bilolyckor med dödlig utgång. De visades utan kommentarer och väckte en våldsam uppståndelse.

 

Ballards fascination inför ämnet kulminerade tre år senare med romanen Crash. Då jag läste den var jag oförberedd på denna orgie av död, våld och sex, skriven av någon som tycktes vara fullkomligt utlämnande då det gällde sin fixering vid vad jag uppfattade som en ohämmad perversion. En uppenbar psykopat som frossade i ett sjukligt idisslande kring varje upptänkligt sätt som mänskliga kroppsdelar och vätskor kan sammanblandas med de förvridna metalldelarna efter en bilolycka. Sida upp och sida med noggrant beskrivna sexscener, ständigt i samband med bilkörning och bilolyckor. Ett sceneri lika instängt och groteskt förvridet som de Sades i längden sterila och enformiga romaner, fullkomligt i avsaknad som de är av glädje och medkänsla.

 

 

Hos Ballard blir erotiken förtingligad, profanerad, kommersialiserad och banaliserad, frigjord från naturen förenas den med teknologi och mekanik. Chockeffekten mattas, kvar blir enbart förundran över att någon har förmått skriva något sådant. Minns inte om jag läste ut romanen.

 

Historien berättas av en person med samma namn som författaren. Han bor liksom Ballard gjorde i Shepperton en förstad till London, i närheten till en av motorvägarna ut mot Heathrows flygplats. Även om Ballard medvetet grumlar likheterna förstår läsaren att det finns ett samband mellan huvudpersonens och författarens fascination inför våldsamma bilolyckor. Romanens berättare attraheras, sexuellt såväl som intellektuellt, av en tidigare ”TV-vetenskapsman” som förvandlats till en ”motorvägarnas mardrömsängel” och med en bil försedd med polisradio försöker uppsöka varje fruktansvärd olycka som rapporteras över den. Orimligt upphetsad dyker han upp med sina kameror och frossar i blod och vrakdelar.

 

Ballard blir efter det att han skadats svårt i en trafikolycka närmare bekant med den demoniske olyckshabituén och snart har han sällat sig till ett sällskap av alienerade galningar, överlevare från andra olyckor, som slaviskt följer den perverterade symphorofiliagalningen under hans jakt efter katastrofer. Efterhand bidrar det groteska gänget med att iscensätta trafikolyckor ofta med dödlig utgång både för dem själva och deras offer. Ledarens yttersta önskan är att själv dö i en frontalkrock med Elizabeth Taylor.

 

 

Efter det att de chockerande osmakligheterna sjunkit undan har jag börjat fundera kring Crash och det är därför jag nu förgäves sökt efter den. Kanske var det så att Ballard trots allt var kritiskt inställd till det som han så ingående beskrev? Vad han försökte uttrycka genom sin perversa brutalitet var kanske inget annat än en kritik av de känslolösa omgivningar och tänkande som en överteknologiserad kultur har skapat. Hur den har invaderat och förgiftat inte enbart vårt tänkande utan även våra kroppar och vårt undermedvetna driftsliv.

 

Möjligen handlar Crash om hur människor skadats av djupgående depressioner som följt på svårartade, djupt traumatiska upplevelser. Hur de har alieneras från verkligheten och fallit offer för en depraverad besatthet som förvärrats efter det att de har mött någon som haft liknande upplevelser och smittats av samma dolda drifter, En såväl intellektuellt som sexuell symbios gör så att de tillsammans förlorar all kontroll och hänger kropp och själ åt det mest förbjudna. En tillvaro där allt och alla utnyttjas inom en fullkomligt perverterad omgivning, där deras förvridna driftsliv gynnas av en människofientlig teknologi som obevekligt orsakat en drift vars slutmål är detsamma för oss alla – Döden.

 

 

Yoko Ogawas Minnespolisen är fjärran från det frenetiska vansinnet i Ballards Crash, men Bruce Sterling säkerligen ha karaktäriserat även hennes roman som en slipstreamprodukt. Den utspelar sig i en hamnstad på en isolerad ö, som dock tycks var stor och självförsörjande. Få ting antyder att den inte skulle utspela sig i nutid – där finns bilar, tåg, affärer, institutioner, skolor och bibliotek. Människor, vanor och infrastruktur ger intryck av att spegla panska förhållanden, men det finns subtila förskjutningar som gör Minnespolisen till en slipstreamroman som väcker associationer till andra verk som Orwells 1984 och Bradburys Fahrenheit 451, fast enligt min mening är Ogams roman med sin stillsamt lyiska berättarton fullkomligt unik.

 

 

 

Kanske är Ogawa del av en speciell japansk berättarådra som jag tror mig ha funnit hos författare som Kobo Abe och alldeles speciellt i en roman av Taichi Yamada, Främlingar. I Yamadas roman hamnar en TV-manusförfattare efter ett misslyckat äktenskap i en väldig byggnad i Tokyos centrum. Större delen av lägenheterna har på grund av oöverstigliga hyror övergetts av sina tidigare hyresgäster och gjorts om till kontorslokaler, något som gör att manusförfattaren om nätterna är så gott som ensam i den för övrigt tomma byggnaden. Han plågas av mardrömmar och minnen av sin svunna kärlek och trygghet, har svårt att sova och strövar omkring i ett Tokyo som om natten får en spöklig karaktär. På en bar träffar han sin sedan länge avlidne far och blir hembjuden till sitt forna föräldrahem där han bjuds på middag av sin döda mor. Det tykcs som om det i det toppmoderna existerar en parallellvärld där det förgångna fortlever. Då huvudpersonen om nätterna återvänder till sin lägenhet får han ibland besök av en vacker kvinna som tycks var en av de får kvarvarande hyresgästerna i en byggnad där mannen enbart brukar sammanträffa med portvakten.

 

 

Flera japanska skräckfilmer, myter och sagor antyder att Japan är befolkat av spöken, andar och demoner, kanske en reflektion av en urgammal tro på kamis, ett begrepp som möjligen kan tolkas som ”naturgudar” eller ”andar”. Kamis kan inneslutas av såväl djur och männsikor, som olika föremål och hemsöka speciella platser. Liksom Yamadas nattliga Tokyo är Ogawas ö en plats bortom den vardag vi är vana vid.

 

Till skillnad från de begärsbesatta galningarna i Ballards Crash är människorna i Ogawas Minnespolisen i allmänhet goda och omtänksamma. Samtliga är dock underkastade tyranniet från en mystisk Minnespolis, som beväpnad och uniformsklädd far omkring med bepansrade fordon. Dt finns också en ständigt närvarande och obegriplig, men till synes tillmötesgående, byråkrati som tjänar en repressionen. Var och vilka statens styresmän är får vi aldrig veta. Avde för oss okända orsaker har de de styrande har fullkomligt isolerat sitt örike från omvärlden och strävar efter att från dess invånare utplåna samtliga minnen. Med jämna mellanrum kommer exempelvis dekret om att alla rosor skall försvinna, en annan dag kan det röra sig om fåglar eller böcker. Det tycks som om såväl kultur som natur slaviskt åtföljer dekreten – floder och havsstränder fylls av rosenblad, stora fågelflockar lämnar ön . En morgon kan öns befolkning vakna upp och finna att de förlorat sitt doftsinne, eller att all fågelsång tystnat. Som om de vill att förlusten skall bli total förstör de frivilligt förbjudna växter, böcker och andra ting som Minnespolisen har för avsikt att utplåna.

 

Minnespolisen härjar fritt och möter inget motstånd. De för bort människor som vägrar följa direktiv och/eller visar tecken på att inte kunna, eller vilja glömma. De bortförda återkommer inte. Det ryktas att de förts till anstalter där man forskar för att finna och utplåna de gener och hjärnfunktioner som skapar och stödjer minnesfunktioner. Även om människor är passiva och tiger, finns det en del av dem gömmer misstänka minnesförbrytare.

 

 

Ogawas roman är lyrisk och vacker, med begåvad med en stillsam och sällsamt sordinerad berättarröst. Berättaren är en ung författarinna vars föräldrar, en ornitolog och en konstnärinna, har förts bort av minnespolisen, som även rannsakat hennes hem. Hennes bästa vän och förtrogne är en gammal sjökapten som bor på en rostande och oanvänd färja förankrad i hamnen. Tillsammans med honom har hon i sitt hem gömt sin förläggare som visat sig ha ett osvikligt minne. Dold i ett lönnrum försöker han förtvivlat få sjökaptenen och författaren att bevara och odla sina minnen. Ett hopplöst företag eftersom de bortsett från att hålla förläggaren dold laglydigt följer Minnespolisens absurda direktiv. Under historiens lopp sprider sig armod och tristess över ön alltmedan naturen också tycks ge upp, snö faller och vintern blir aldrig vår, människor förlorar föremål, bekvämlighet, självförtroende, minnen medan allt obeveklighet rör sig mot en allomfattande tomhet, total utplåning.

 

 

Minnespolisen är varken en lång eller svårläst roman. En sällsynt pärla med subtila skiftningar och en utsökt yta som väcker minnen av japanska träsnitt, Shindos filmer och Kawabatas naturskildringar. Under sin skenbara enkelhet döljer romanen tankedjup som kräver eftertanke och omläsning.

 

Läsningen av Ogawa var det frö som i mitt medvetande fick en mängd tankar och associationer att spira. En del har jag nu redogjort för, men det finns åtskilligt mer att finna och inspireras av i Minnespolisen och jag kan intet annat än rekommendera er att läsa den.

 

 

 

Aldiss, Brian (1982) Frankenstein Unbound. New York: HarperCollins. Ballard, J. G. (1997) Cocaine Nights. London: Fourth Estate. Ballard, J. G. (2001) Crash. London: Picador. Bauman, Zygmunt (2006) Liquid Times: Living in an Age of Uncertainty. Cambridge: Polity. Burke, Edmund (1998) A Philosophical Enquiry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Carrington, Leonora (2017) Down Below. New York: NYRB Classics. Chirico, Giorgio de (1992) Hebdomeros. Cambridge: Exact Change. Colapinto, John (2006) As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised As A Girl. New York: Harper Perennial. Ende, Michael (2007) Momo eller kampen om tiden: En sagoroman. Stockholm: Berghs. Flood, Alison (2011) ”Getting more from RR Martin,” The Guardian, 14 April. Gray, John (2003) Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. London: Granta Books. Kavan, Anna (1970) Ice. London: Picador. King, Stephen (2011) 11/22/63. New York: Scribner. Kubin, Alfred (2014) The Other Side. Sawtry: Daedalus. Martin, George R. R. (2011) Kampen om järntronen. Stockholm: Månpocket. Money, J. (1984) ”Paraphilias: Phenomenology and classification,” American Journal of Psychotherapy. No. 38 (2). Ogawa, Yoko (2020) The Memory Police. London: Vintage. Ross, Clifford (ed.) (1990) Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics. New York: Abrahams. Strindberg, August (1996) Tjänstekvinnans son III-IV, Samlade verk 21. Stockholm: Norstedts. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel (2014) On Fairy-stories. New York: HarperCollins. Tyler, Malone (2017) ”A Field of Strangeness: Anna Kavan´s Ice and the Merits of World Blocking,” Los Angeles Review of Books. Vesaas, Tarjei (2020) Isslottet. Stockholm: Norstedts. Yamada, Taichi (2003) Strangers. London: Faber & Faber.

 

Det var i början av 2014 som jag började skriva min blogg. Jag arbetade då på en skola i Växjö, medan jag bodde hos min mor i Hässleholm. Jag hade för en tid lämnat min hustru i Rom, men åkte dit för jämnan. Att jag hamnat i Växjö berodde på att jag i Rom, som så ofta förr, inte hade något jobb och det gick långa tider mellan de få konsultuppdrag jag lyckades ro i hamn. Min mor var nittiotre år, kände sig ensam i sitt hus och blev allt skröpligare. Fast hon var fullkomligt klar i huvudet, med ett minne bättre än mitt.

 

Då vi i slutet av sommaren 2013 besökte Sverige antog jag att det kanske vore en god idé att för en tid arbeta som lärare. Det brukade i Sverige gå tämligen lätt för mig att få jobb som en sådan. Även om det gått flera år sedan jag arbetade som lärare kunde jag räkna med min lärarutbildning och hade under årens lopp samlat på mig en del undervisningserfarenhet. Jag sökte ett par gymnasiejobb i närheten av Hässleholm och fick napp i det närliggande Kristianstad. En vecka innan jag skulle börja arbeta ringde de dock och meddelade att de oväntat ”fått tag på en yngre förmåga som antagligen passade bättre för jobbet”. Jag reste då till Växjö, där jag fått ett erbjudande som jag avslagit eftersom Kristianstad var närmre. I Växjö visade det sig att de fortfarande ville ha mig som lärare i mina ämnen – svenska och religion, samt några lektioner i engelska. Jag tog jobbet, något som betydde att jag varje morgon tog tåget till Växjö, en timmes färd som gav mig tid att förbereda dagens lektioner och rätta skrivningar.

 

Det var en pittoresk skola, inrymd i Växjös före detta lokstallar. Kollegorna var trevliga och även eleverna, något som gjorde att jag trivdes alldeles utmärkt, samtidigt som det kändes betryggande att göra min åldrande mor sällskap under kvällarna. Det var under våren som min yngre syster, som känner min skrivklåda, föreslog mig att jag skulle skriva en blogg. Sedan dess har jag suttit fast i vanan.

 

 

På Smålandsgymnasiet, som i varje annan skola jag arbetat, skilde sig stämningen från klass till klass. Jag har ofta undrat varför det är på det viset. En av klasserna var sammansatt av förhoppningsfulla datatekniker. Jag upptäckte snart att ett par av dem var ivriga läsare av så kallad fantasylitteratur och samtidigt högst avancerade datorspelare. De visste allt om sådant jag knappt hört talas om, men likväl fann vara en fascinerande, om än obegriplig, värld. Jag är alldeles för gammal för sådant och kan svårligen föreställa mig att slösa tid på datorspel. Jag skrev dock ner namnen på de spel som mina elever rekommenderade och ivrigt berättade om. Jag antog att det möjligen ingår i nutidens allmänbildning att ha något hum om dem – Myst, Portal, The Secret of Monkey Island, Machinarium, Grim Fandango, The Cat Lady, Broken Sword, Bad Mojo, Amnesia.

 

Begrep inte hur mina elever kunde finna tid att leka med allt det där och likväl inte vara helt bortkomna då det gällde att tillgodogöra sig den utbildning jag försökte delge dem. Flera av dem var till min glädje ivriga romanläsare rekommenderade en mängd litteratur jag inte hört talas om. Då jag frågade dem vem de tyckte var den bäste fantasyförfattaren svarade de enhälligt – George R. R. Martin.

 

Visserligen hade HBO Nordic börjat visa Game of Thrones, men jag kände inte alls till den och det dröjde ytterligare ett par år innan jag följde Tv-serien. På biblioteket lånade jag första delen av Martins massiva bokserie Sagan om is och eld, men tyckte att Kampen om järntronen var lite väl tjock. Då jag läst ett par kapitel gav jag upp. Jag hade läst det där förr; ett svärd som hette Is, en fånig trubadur, ett högt beläget slott med trappor huggna ur klippan ”för branta till och med för åsnor”. Det var för mycket dialog för min smak, för många schablonmässiga uttryck, endimensionella karaktärer, antingen alltför onda, eller enfaldigt goda, en korkad prinsessa, en åldrad, försvagad kung, en skum arvtagare ...

 

Men då jag några år senare började följa Tv-serien antog jag att jag varit trångsynt och fördomfull Jag borde ha gett K. K. Martin en bättre chans. Tv-serien var nämligen inte alls förutsägbar och flera av karaktärerna var intressanta, ändrade sig och fördjupades under historiens lopp. Det var dynamiskt, spännande och oväntat.

 

Trots mina förutfattade meningar läste jag redan i Växjö en del om K. K. Martin, som såg ut som en New Age-mysgubbe. I The Guardian fann jag en intervju med författaren, som jag som nybliven bloggare med lätthet kunde identifiera mig med. George R. R. Martin påstod nämligen:

 

en del författare skriver klart sin bok och bryr sig egentligen inte om att den tagit tid att skriva eller om den någonsin kommer att bli publicerad. Och om den kommer ut får den ett par recensioner och säljer 12 exemplar.

 

En tämligen adekvat beskrivning av mitt författarskap. Sedan gav han en utmärkt redogörelse för hur jag går tillväga då jag skriver:

 

Jag antar att det finns två typer av författare, arkitekterna och trädgårdsmästarna. Arkitekterna planerar allt i förväg, som en arkitekt går tillväga då han konstruerar ett hus. De vet hur många rum som kommer att finnas i huset, vilken typ av tak det kommer att ha, var ledningarna skall dras, vilken typ av VVS som skall installeras. Innan den första spiken satts i den första brädan har de designat och ritat det hela. Trädgårdsmästarna däremot gräver ett hål, sår ett frö och vattnar det.

 

Som ”författare” tillhör jag trädgårdsmästarnas skrå. Jag vet inte hur mina bloggar eller romaner skall utveckla sig. Ser jag tillbaka på dem utgör de förvisso vildvuxna, oansade trädgårdar med alltför mycket törne och ogräs.

 

Frön till bloggen du läser är snö, is och besatthet – dess betydelse för en viss sorts litteratur som fascinerat mig under lång tid, något jag insåg efter att ha läst Yoko Ogamas roman Minnespolisen. Att jag plockade upp den boken beror på att min familj nästan dagligen klagar över mitt bristande minne, trots att jag själv inte märkt att det är sämre än tidigare. Likt många människor är jag allt som oftast tankspridd och glömmer var jag lagt saker och ting – nycklar, glasögon, gamla intyg och kvitton. Dock tror jag inte att det inte blivit mycket värre med åren.

 

Vad som däremot oroar mig, och även på den fronten inbillar jag mig att jag inte skiljer mig från de flesta män i min ålder, är att då jag tänker tillbaka på mitt liv upptäcker hur att stora block med händelser har fallit bort, försvunnit och lämnat gapande tomrum efter sig, eller än värre – ingenting. Tänker på det italienska uttrycket un buco nell´aqua, ett hål i vattnet. Som en droppe när den spårlöst försvinner i en vattensamling har inte enbart namnen på vänner och bekanta, utan även själva individerna och vårt samröre med varandra fullständigt försvunnit ur mitt minne. Samtidigt kan dock märkliga ”minnesblock” oväntat dyka upp till ytan av mitt medvetande.

 

För mig utgör endel romaner sådana ”minnesblock”. I min bokhylla kan jag kasta blicken på en bok och plötsligt minnas då jag köpte och läste den. Efter att ha läst Ogamas Minnespolis tog jag fram Brian Aldiss, Frankenstein Unbound, Frankenstein i frihet. Den handlar nämligen om ”tidsblock” , hur förfluten tid tränger sig in i våra liv och förändrar dem, samtidigt som vi genom att manipulera det förgångna kan förändra framtiden.

 

Jag läste Aldiss roman någon gång vid mitten av sjuttiotalet. Som så ofta är fallet fascinerades jag av bokomslaget, kanske på samma sätt som jag kan köpa en flaska vin för att etiketten tilltalar mig. Jag antog att titeln anspelade på en tämligen oläslig pjäs av Percy Bysshe Shellley, Prometheus Unbound, som dykt upp under en litteraturhistorielektion. Skulle tro att det var i samband med en föreläsning om August Strindberg, revoltören mot allt och alla som uppenbarligen, likt Shelley, låtit sig inspireras, både politiskt och personligt, av den mytologiske titanen och upprorsmannen Prometheus, som satt sig upp mot den diktatur som tillämpades av Olympens gudar och därför straffats på ett bestialiskt sätt – Han kedjades vid en klippa i Kaukasus där en gam ständigt hackar i hans lever, vilken dock växer ut igen. I sin självbiografi Tjänstekvinnans son skrev Strindberg:

 

 Det är ganska fysiologiskt riktigt att den antike skalden låter Prometheus gnagas i levern av gamen. Prometheus var revoltören som ville ge mänskorna  upplysning […] han blev säkerligen gallsprängd av att se världen vara  ett  dårhus där fånarne gingo  lösa och bevakade den ende kloke såsom en livsfarlig. Sjukdomar kunna färga människans åskådningar och var och en vet huru mörka alla  ankar bli när man ansättes av en feber.

 

Frankensten Unbound, skriven 1974, berättar Aldiss hur vetenskapsmannen Joe Bodenland någon gång under 2020 med sin bil far rakt in i ett tidsgap, ett begrepp som antagligen borde förklaras mer ingående. Ett världskrig hade skapat katastrofala förhållanden. Stridande stormakter hade insett att kärnvapenkrigföring på jorden skulle få ödesdigra följder för samtliga stridande, därför hade man utvecklat Space Forces, Rymdstyrkor. Den väpnade maktkampen förlades därmed till rymden, bortom jorden och därute ägnade sig de politiska maktsfärerna åt ett hämningslöst kärnvapenkrigande.

 

Då fred åter etablerats hade obotliga skador inte gjort planeten Jorden till en obeboelig värld, men en oförutsägbar sådan. Utvecklingen hade fortgått och skapat en högteknologisk kultur med en bibehållen biosfär, men de avlägsna kärnvapenkrigen hade ruckat tids-rum balansen. Detta innebar att vissa av jordens individer som vid ett slumpmässigt tillfälle befann sig på en viss plats kunde hjälplöst slungas in i en annan tidsdimension. Ett sådant tillstånd kunde pågå en längre eller kortare tid, tills dess tidsskalan korrigerat sig själv och återställt den drabbade individen till rätt tid och plats.

 

 

Det var vad som drabbat Joe Bodenland. Med sin bil hade han slungats genom tids-rum rymden till det tidiga 1800-talets Schweiz. Där möter han Victor Frankenstein. Det visar sig att hans monster faktiskt existerar och det gör också Mary Shelley, författarinnan som hittat på historien om Frankensteins monster. Inom ett tidsgap existerar nämligen inte enbart en ”påtaglig” verklighet, som den tedde sig vid den tid det rör sig om, men tids-rum balansen har även påverkats av tankarna som fanns hos de människor som levde då.

 

När Joe Bodenland 1816 träffar Mary Shelley, hette hon fortfarande Mary Godwin och hade då varken skrivit sin berömda roman Frankenstein: eller den moderne Prometeus, eller gift sig med Percy Bysshe Shelley som 1820, två år efter det att Frankenstein publicerats, skrev sin Prometheus Unbound. Då Bodenland träffar dem bor Percy Shelley och Mary Godwin tillsammans med Lord Byron i en villa vid Genèvesjön

 

Joe Bodenland inser att skapandet av Frankensteins monster är inledningen till en katastrofal utveckling som kommer att leda till ett manipulerande av människans arvsmassa och få lika förödande konsekvenser som de som framställandet av den första atombomben orsakade. Aldiss roman blandar vilt litteratur- och vetenskapshistoria och i sin galna roman ställer han väsentliga frågor kring vetenskapsmännens ansvar och den skapande fantasins roll då det gäller att göra människor medvetna om sin existens och sitt ansvar för utvecklingen. Något som möjligen kan vara svårt att lägga märke till under ytan av en rafflande äventyrshistoria som bygger på såväl Mary Shelleys roman, som på allsköns science fiction berättelser och action filmer, exempelvis James Bondfilmer.

 

Aldiss monster har fler drag av Mary Shelleys ursprungliga skapelse än William Wylers berömda version av den. Därmed inte sagt att Aldiss även har inspirerats av Boris Karloffs monsterframställning. Aldiss gestaltning av monstret sammanfaller med såväl romanens som filmens beskrivning av en varelse som inte vet vad den skall göra efter sitt uppvaknande som en monstruös varelse och därför beter sig som ett barn kan göra; slår tanklöst mot sådant det inte begriper, samtidigt som det ställer besvärliga frågor och orimliga krav. Men liksom i Shelleys roman är monstret hos Aldiss även ett känsligt väsen vars främsta strävan är att få dela sitt liv med en varelse som tänker och känner som han. Monstret blir dock fruktat och bortstött och då han konfronteras med sin spegelbild begriper han varför andra känner avsky inför hans blotta uppenbarelse. I romanen är monstret både vältaligt och talfört, inom elva månader efter sin skapelse hade han lärt han sig tala både tyska och franska. Men då han inser vad hans skapare, Dr Frankenstein gjort, svär det förtvivlade monstret på att krossa och utplåna honom.

 

Inspirationen från Bondfilmer är i Aldiss roman speciellt påtaglig genom Joe Bodenlands bil, som följer honom till Genèvesjöns strand och imponerar på såväl den unga Mary Godwin som vetenskapsmannen Victor Frankenstein. Den använder inte fossila bränslen, är försedd med såväl GPS, bildskärm, mobiltelefon och en allvetande funktion inte olik, fast mer sofistikerad, än nutidens Siri. Likt en Bondbil är den även försedd med sofistikerade vapen. Sådana detaljer gör att Aldiss roman faktiskt fungerar som trovärdig science fiction. Joe Bodenlands bil är tämligen förbluffande med tanke på att den 2020 faktiskt inte framstår lika föråldrad som så mycken annan science fiction från anno dazumal.

 

Galenskapen är onekligen närvarande i Aldiss roman, men snön och isen som jag ovan nämnde som frön till den här bloggen – är även de närvarande? Förvisso, såväl Shelleys som Aldiss roman avslutas med en jakt på monstret över öde snövidder. Hos Shelley äger den rum i outforskade polartrakter, hos Aldiss inom ett tidsgap i en avlägsen framtid där Joe Bodenlands omgivning tycks falla sönder i en ödelagd värld skapad genom hans egna handlingar i ett avlägset förflutet

 

Därigenom påminner Aldiss Frankenstein Unbound om Stephen Kings märkliga och imponerande tidsreseroman 11/22/63 där en man reser tillbaka i tiden och lyckas hindra Lee Harvey Oswald från att mörda John F. Kennedy, enbart för att finna att hans heroiska handling i framtiden får än mer katastrofala följder än han någonsin hade kunnat förvänta sig.

 

Det är tveksamt om Anna Kavans Is kan kallas för en science fiction roman. Den utspelar sig i en parallell verklighet som möjligen kan vara förlagd till framtiden, men det är osäkert. Den tycks heller inte skildra en förfluten, avlägsen tid. I romanen finns bilar, tåg, flyg och grammofoner, men plötsligt kan läsaren finna sig i en blodig plundring av en stad där svärdsbeväpnade och bepansrade ryttare massakrerar invånarna. Eller en nordisk ruinstad där en jungfru offras till en drake som bor på botten av en fjord. Jag köpte romanen samtidigt som Brian Aldiss Frankenstein Unbound och då jag nu läser den finner jag till min förvåning att Aldiss har skrivit förordet i vilket han beskriver Anna Kavan som en författarinna som hos Kafka funnit en teknik hon använt sig av för att skildra en samtid hon uppfattade som ytterst hotfull.

 

Kavans roman tycks utspela sig under den osäkra freden efter ett förödande stormaktskrig. Städer ligger i ruiner och beväpnade soldater kontrollerar medborgarna, begär dokument och kontrollerar om utegångsförbud följs. Vi tycks befinna oss i ett land behärskat av en totalitär regim. I romanens inledning besöker berättaren, en uppenbarligen förmögen författare, en bekant som är konstnär och gift med en bräcklig, eterisk och skir kvinna som tidigare tycks ha haft ett förhållande med författaren. Hennes make, konstnären, behandlar sin undflyende och känsliga hustru illa och hon försvinner. Makens likgiltighet och demoniska personlighet får författaren att misstänka att han mördat sin hustru. Hans efterforskningar spårar henne dock till en avlägsen kuststad i ett land som kan påminna om Norge. Där hålls hon fånge av the Warden, Uppsyningsmannen, en krigsherre som omgiven en välbeväpnad privatarmé bor i ett luxuöst palats i en ruinstad, vars misstänksamma och brutala invånare ger intryck av att befinna sig på en medeltida nivå. Det hela får mig osökt att tänka på The Game of Thrones , inte minst med tanke på att det utanför staden finns en jättelik mur och landet, kanske även världen i övrigt, hotas av en inlandsis som obevekligt närmar sig.

 

The Game of Thrones skyddas Westeros sydliga länder av en väldig mur som reser sig mot de nordliga snövidder från vilka isvålnader närmar sig för att lägga under sig Westeros och utplåna dess stridande klaner. Hotet uttrycks i mottot för Huset Stark, Westeros nordliga murväktare: ”Winter is Coming, Vinter är på väg”. Skulle inte tro att K.K. Martin inspirerats av Anna Kavans Is, men säkerligen av den norrröna mytologins Fimbulvinter, den vinter som oavbrutet kommer att råda under tre års innan Ragnarök äger rum – Världens undergång.

 

Den vittberesta Anna Kavan hade säkerligen haft Norden i tankarna då hon skrev Is, men var antagligen främst inspirerad av de två år som hon under Andra världskriget tillbringade i Nya Zeeland, oroad av krigshändelserna i norr och känslan av närhet till Antarktis ismassor i söder. Trots skildringarna av ett hotfullt, märkligt landskap är det inte det, utan inre känslotillstånd som Kavan tycks vilja skildra och projicera på karaktärernas omgivningar Perspektiv förskjuts ständigt – från det intima, till det vidsträckta. Berättaren tycks efterhand alltmer uppgå i den brutale Wardens gestalt alltmedan den bleka kvinnan beständigt framställs som ett undflyende, men plågat offer. Anna Kavan har hos flera läsare kommit att framstå som en ”feministisk” ikon och hennes roman har tolkats som en kommentar till hur ett globalt, politiskt våld och en hotande miljöförstöring kan kopplas till en skrämmande ”erotisk objektifiering” av kvinnor och förvandlat dem till offer inom ett självförtärande, känslokallt kollektiv.

 

Jag tror inte att Anna Kavan läste den norske författaren Tarjei Vesaas roman Isslottet som skrevs 1963, men publicerades på engelska 1966, året innan hennes Is kom utOmöjligt är det dock inte eftersom Vesaas roman kom ut på samma förlag som hennes romaner – Peter Owen. Även Vesaas roman behandlar alienation och kyla utifrån ett kvinnligt perspektiv, men är trots sina symbolistiska undertoner strikt realistisk.

 

I en isolerad norsk by blir den livliga, elvaåriga Siss (Sissela) god vän med den undandragna och lite udda Unn. Då flickorna under den första dagen av sin bekantskap leker ensamma tillsammans finner de sig märkligt dragna till varandra. Den utåtriktade, ledargestalten Siss upptäcker något av sig själv i den allvarliga, plågade Unn, och tvärtom.

 

Unn blir som förtrollad av den öppna, skrattande Siss och lyckas övertala henne att de skall klä av sig nakna. Då de står nakna inför varandra undrar Unn om Siss kan se någon skillnad mellan dem. Då Siss svarar att hon inte kan det, förklarar Unn att hon vet att det är något som inte stämmer med henne. Att hon är rädd för att efter sin död inte få tillträde till himlen. Hon anklagar sig själv för att hennes mor dött sex månader tidigare och hon vet inte vem hennes far är.

 

 

När de klätt på sig igen känner Siss sig besvärad, orolig och rädd. Hon flyr hem i mörkret, men ligger liksom Unn sömnlös under natten. Dagen efter kan Unn inte förmå sig att komma till skolan för att där konfrontera sig med sin nyfunna vän. Istället söker hon till isslottet, väldiga isformationer som under hårda nordiska vintrar bildas av fruset vatten kring stora vattenfall. Driven av barnets drift att testa och utmana sig själv tar sig Unn in i is-salarna. Betagen av isgrottornas mystiska och förgängliga skönhet försjunker hon i tankar om sig själv och Siss. Unn förirrar sig slutligen i det kyliga mörkret, trampar genom isen och drunknar.

 

Folk i byn tror att Siss vet mer om Unns försvinnande än hon låter påskina och tyngd av skuld och sorg tar Siss på sig Unns roll som utanförstående och blir en ensling såväl i hemmet som skolan. Isslottet är en förrädiskt enkel, men sparsmakad och samtidigt lyrisk, berättelse som under sin skenbart realistiskt yta gömmer bråddjup. Den får mig att tänka på mästerliga japanska haiku där naturscenerier och stämningar inom ett strängt begränsat utrymme samverkar för att skapa bilder av inre känslolägen.

 

Romaner som Isslottet, och även i viss mån Is, och givetvis Kafkas verk, är skrivna på ett rakt, uppenbart realistiskt sätt som vaggar in läsaren i en värld som samtidigt är galen och förnuftig. Sådana litterära verk speglar vad J. R. R. Tolkien en gång skrev om sagor ”ju skarpare och klarare förnuftet är, desto bättre fantasier skapar det.” Vad Tolkien tycks mena är att sagor och fantastiska , liksom drömmar, kräver inre logik och klarhet. En realism som inom sina bestämda ramar blir till något helt annat – drömmar som avslöjar vad vår existens verkligen innebär.

 

Jag funderade på detta då jag igår såg Jan Švankmajers film Alice, som min äldsta dotter sänt

mig från Prag. För några år sedan såg vi tillsammans en utställning med Švankmajers kusliga, men samtidigt humoristiska ”skulpturer”, en slags collage av uppstoppade djur och skelettdelar. De påminde om de kuriosakabinett som under Barocken var populära vid europeiska furstehov. Inte minst hos Rudolph II, den ytterst excentriske kejsaren för det tysk-romerska riket som höll till på kungaborgen Pražský hrad i Prag, där han kring sig samlade alkemister, magiker, originella konstnärer och geniala vetenskapsmän. En med åren tilltagande sinnessjukdom hindrade Rudolph från leda ett imperium som föll samman under pressen från religiösa reformationer och slutligen besegrades han av sin mentalsjukdom, tvingades abdikera och överlämna kejsarvärdigheten till sin bror och dog slutligen som en galen enstöring.

 

Švankmajers Alice heter egentligen Nĕco z Alenky, Något om Alice, och är en fri tolkning av Lewis Carrols Alice i Underlandet, en bok jag läst flera gånger, alltid lika förbluffad hur någon förmått skildra ett barns drömvärld. Švankmajers film är en så kallad stop motion animation, befolkad av en livslevande Alice som rör sig bland hans groteska skapelser; kusliga malätna dockor och bisarra djur inom nergångna och sönderfallande rum och hyreskaserner. Ett skräckinjagande, fantasirikt och, likt Kafkas berättelser, märkligt humoristiskt universum.

 

Just så skall Alice i Underlandet skildras. Inte relativt slaviskt, som i Disney gjorde i sin i och för sig geniala tolkning, eller fullkomligt påhittat eller löjligt förenklat som i Tim Burtons katastrofala version, som är en av mitt flitiga biobesökandes största besvikelser – jag hade av honom väntat mig något betydligt bättre än en pastellfärgad, fjantig version om kampen för att rädda Wonderland. Usch!

 

Till skillnad från Burton skapade Švankmajer ett mästerverk – en parallellvärld till Carolls Underland, även den sedd genom ett barns ögon, tolkad med ett barns förundran, frimodighet och oro. En dröm bortom gott och ont, bortom de vuxnas förnumstiga pekpinnevärld och istället präglad av ett barns snedvridna, men samtidigt djupt personliga och därmed sanna föreställningsvärld.

 

En abnormitet som även präglar den värld som Anna Kavan skildrar i sin roman. Hennes ursprungliga namn var Helen Emily Woods och hon var det enda, ensamma och i stort sett ignorerade barnet i en dysfunktionell familj. Då hon var elva år tog hennes far livet av sig och som nittonåring övertygade hennes mor henne att gifta sig med sin egen avlagda älskare. Han gjorde Anna med barn och tog med sig henne till Burma, där han arbetade som järnvägsingenjör, de skildes åt efter tre år.

 

Då Helen Woods tog sig namnet Anna Kavan och fullkomligt förändrade sin tillvaro var det enbart ett av flera uppbrott under ett kringflackande liv. Under tjugotalet levde hon bland racerförare på Rivieran och grundlade där ett livslångt heroinberoende, som inte lindrades under hennes senare liv inom olika konstnärskretsar. Anna åkte ut och in mellan olika mentalkliniker och förmådde inte befria sig från ett allvarligt drogberoende, som slutligen blev en bidragande orsak till hennes död 1968.

 

Vid sidan om sitt författarskap, var Anna Kavan en begåvad konstnär vars konst ofta speglar hennes uppdiktade världar, med dess poetiska skönhet och kusliga suggestionskraft. Att vara såväl konstnär som författarinna delar hon exempelvis med Leonora Carrington vars drömbok Down Below, Där nere, likt flera Anna Kavans litterära verk skildrar en galen, förvriden verklighet. Carrington skrev Down Below under en djup kris, då hon som så ofta varit fallet med Kavan, satt inspärrad på ett mentalsjukhus.

 

Carringtons konst får mig att associera till Tove Jansson, som förvisso inte alls var galen, men liksom Kavan och Carrington förmådde skapa en parallellvärld av såväl lyrik och skönhet, som hotande mystik och fara. Hotfullheten som för det mesta lurar i Tove Jansson böcker mildras av värmen och den intima tryggheten inom den godmodigt generösa och lekfullt fantasirika Muminfamiljen.

 

Tove Janssons pittoreska Mumindal med dess omgivande mörka berg och skogar är en unik värld precis som landskapen i Michael Endes roman Momo eller kampen om tiden, fast i hans fall är omgivningarna mer än hos Jansson kopplade till en reell verklighet – Italien där tysken Ende under större delen av sitt liv hade sitt hem. Även Ende var en skrivande konstnär. I Momo, liksom i Kavans Is, hotas världen av en själsdödande kyla. Hos Momo är det gråa män i tjänst hos kommersialism och likriktande totalitarism som stjäl tid och därmed dödar fantasi och skaparkraft.

 

Två av mina andra favoritromaner är även de skrivna av bilkonstnärer – Alfred Kubins Den andra sidan och Giorgio de Chiricos Hebdomeros. Kubins roman är en mörk fabel om en stad som sakta förfaller i takt med en despots fysiska försämring och moraliska fördärv. Stadens modernitet som kombineras med uråldriga, fallfärdiga kvarter och underjordiska tunnlar fick mig att tänka på Prag. Det allmänna sönderfallet under en alltmer galen härskare kan möjligen sammanställas med tillståndet som rådde under Rudolph II, men kanske även oron som rådde inom det Österikisk-Ungerska kejsardömet innan det Första världskrigets utbrott, romanen skrevs 1908. Kubin kände Kafka och var en flitig pragbesökare. Kubins mörka och hotfulla värld är inte helt olikt Ana Kavans isvärld, fast historien utspelar sig i ett mer tropiskt klimat.

 

Trots sin bildrikedom och filmatiska scenerier har Den andra sidan en mer eller mindre fast berättarstruktur. de Chiricos Hebdomeros liknar däremot Kavans Is i den meningen att den italienske konstnärens roman framstår som ett slags bildcollage, utan ett klart händelseförlopp. Hebdomeros har än mer tvära kast mellan scenerier, bilder och episoder än Kavans Is, men den är också i min mening mer lyrisk och målerisk. Hebdomeros skrevs 1929, men kom då ut i en liten upplaga och förblev så gott som okänd fram till 1964, då den uppmärksammades som kanske den främsta ”surrealistiska” roman som skrivits. Detta trots att Chirico inte betraktade sig som ”surrealist” och dessutom på senare år inte ville kännas vid sin roman, som han skrev på franska. Även det en märklig bedrift med tanke på att Chirico med ett annat modersmål likväl förmådde skriva en så lyrisk och bildrik franska.

 

Det går inte att ta miste på att Hebdomeros fångar stämningarna i Chiricos tavlor, emellanåt genomlysta av Medelhavets värme och ljus, men också förlänad med dess mörkare undertoner. Hebdomeros ger som tavlorna intryck att vara förankrade i en mångtusenårig tradition av konst och estetik. Ett landskap som med sina klassiska allusioner likväl integrerar moderna element som tåg och fabriksskorstenar.

 

De romaner jag nämnt kan antagligen samlas under rubriken Slipstream, en litterär term som 1989 introducerades av den amerikanske, science fiction författaren Bruce Sterling, i ett försök att kategorisera litterära verk som förde in icke-realistiska inslag – som sagor, science fiction, drömmar, fantasy och surrealism – i skildringar som i övrigt framstod som realistiska och dessutom utspelade sig i nutida/samtida miljöer.  

 

Slipstream är i själva verket ett aerodynamiskt begrepp, som används inom motor- och cykelsport. Om ett fordon färdas i hög hastighet skapas bakom det ett undertryck som i sin tur ger upphov till lägre luftmotstånd. Ett fordon som befinner sig precis bakom ett annat fordon i hög hastighet kan dra nytta av det där luftsuget och i en ökad hastighet köra om det framförliggande färdmedlet – i allmänhet en cykel eller en bil.

 

Sterling, som i sitt författarskap ofta använder sig av tämligen egendomliga associationer och nyskapade ord, tycks mena att en berättelseström, exempelvis realism, ger kraft åt en annan berättargenre, exempelvis fantasy, och glider in, slips in, i den och därmed får den andra genren en skjuts framåt och förmår därmed överglänsa den berättarkonst som den dragit nytta av. Sterling beskrev känslan som uppkommer då du läser en slipstreamberättelse:

 

den får dig helt enkelt att känna dig mycket underlig; på ett sätt som påminner dig om hur det är att leva i det tjugoförsta seklet, om du nu är en person förlänad med en speciell känslighet.

 

Slipstreambegreppet antyder rörelse och kan därmed kopplas till modernism i den meningen att den utgör en kommenterar till en komplicerad verklighet; ett ”nu” som vi alla befinner oss i. Slipstreamförfattaren och den värld hen skapar uppkommer genom att hen är en främling i sin tid och därmed betraktar vår tillvaro utifrån sitt utanförskap. Sådana författares skapelser förvandlas till en parallellvärld; en trollspegel som både förvränger och avslöjar vilka vi verkligen är. Som då Frankensteins monster genom att betrakta sin spegelbild drabbas av den plågsamma insikten att han är ett missfoster, en styggelse.

 

I vår moderna värld är vi kringskurna av ett tillstånd statt i ständig förändring och därmed blir också den litteratur som skapas av slipstreamförfattare ”flytande”, såväl anpassningsbar som föränderlig. Likt myter och drömmar öppnar den sig ständigt för nya tolkningar.

 

Sociologen Zygmunt Bauman som ägnat en mängd böcker åt ”främlingen” och ”främlingskapet” sammanställer ofta ”konst” med liquidity, ett flytande tillstånd. Enligt honom är liquidity i stort sett det samma som obeständighet, ett tillstånd som blivit dominerande inom vår nuvarande existens och helt naturligt har samtidskonsten anpassat sig till det.

 

Jag tolkar Baumans argument som att vi söker efter insikter som ytterst visar sig vara präglade av ständig tillblivelse. Ett tillstånd av rörelse, förändring och skapande. I grund och botten strävar vi alltså inte alls efter något mål. Vår längtan, våra handlingar och önskemål har kommit att begränsas av åtrå, lust och begär. Syftet, målet och meningen med vår existens har därmed förlorats ur sikte. Vår värsta farhåga är nu möjligheten att verkligen uppnå full tillfredsställelse – Frälsning

 

Sann konst kan möjligen bidra till att förvandla något som är såväl kortvarigt som kortsiktigt till något som är evigt och beständigt. Inom vår likformade, globala tillvaro hyllas märkligt nog individualism och egenrättfärdighet på bekostnad av etablerade, moraliska värden, exempelvis i form av samverkan för att respektera mänskliga rättigheter och bevara jordens naturresurser. Vi ger oss varken tid eller utrymme att förverkliga något som skulle kunna gynna oss alla, utan rusar istället runt i våra högst personliga och narcissistiskt präglade ekorrhjul. Slipstreamlitteraturen ställer sig dock vid sidan om spektaklet och genom sitt alternativa synsätt visar den oss hur absurd vår tillvaro i själva verket är.

 

Högteknologin har med rasande fart förändrat vårt samhälle – mobiler och telefoner kopplar ihop människor, men samtidigt tycks det som om alltfler av oss har förlorat kontakt med verkligheten. Genom att den fysiska närheten till andra människor har minskats blir även konsekvenserna av vårt handlande allt diffusare.

 

Vi kan numera döda våra medmänniskor med en drone. Har vi frågor och klagomål hänvisas vi till webbsidor och digitaliserade röster. Tekniken har även gjort sin entré inom våra mest intima sfärer. En möjlig konsekvens av ett samlag behöver inte längre vara födseln av ett barn. Sådana kan nu för ett pris tillhandahållas genom spermabanker, eller surrogatmammor. Sexuell samvaro har förvandlats från att vara ett bevis på djup, intim samvaro mellan två människor som verkligen älskar varandra och därigenom är beredda att ta ett gemensamt ansvar för följderna av sitt förhållande. Dessvärre har i dessa moderna tider sexualitet förvandlats till ännu en vara, en föreställning, en mekanisk akt enbart inriktad på fysisk tillfredsställelse. Visst det går det att påpeka att så har det alltid varit inom vissa sfärer av mänsklig samvaro – prostitution har alltid funnits inom mänskliga samhällen.

 

Visst, men nu har tekniken förändrat även de omständigheterna. Då teknologin minskar risker och konsekvenser söker sig nu människor till surrogat för sådant som tidigare engagerade, skrämde och upprörde oss. Allt sådant som Edmund Burke vid mitten av sjuttonhundratalet benämnde det subtila, det vill säga något som är motsatt till intimitet och trygghet, sådant som lugnar våra nerver. Det subtila spänner däremot nerverna, skrämmer och hetsar oss, men gör i gengäld tillvaron mer oförutsägbar och spännande.

 

Ersättningar för tidigare starka emotioner är inte alltid begränsade till digitala upplevelser, utan även teknologiskt underbyggda risktaganden som bungee jumping, fallskärmshoppning, bergsklättring o.dyl. Det främsta teknologiska surrogatet för adrenalinhöjning är möjligen fortfarande bilåkning, helst i lyxiga fordon och i hög hastighet. Ett nöje som i kommersiella syften ofta kopplas samman med sex. Ett lyxigt fordon lockar till dig sexuella partners och förhöjer din prestige:

 

En bekväm, vacker bil kan även omsluta dig dig med en mildrande komfort, förläna en känsla av välbefinnande och självsäkerhet, som i Bruce Springsteens Pink Cadillac:

 

I love you for your pink Cadillac.

Crushed velvet seats.

Riding in the back.

Oozing down the street.

Waving to the girls.

Feeling out of sight.

Spending all my money

On a Saturday night.

 

Jag älskar dig för din rosa Cadillac.

Mjuka sammetssäten.

Färdas i baksätet

Sipprande nerför gatan.

Vinkande åt flickorna.

Känna mig utom synhåll.

Spendera alla mina pengar

under en lördagskväll.

 

En mängd amerikanska sånger besjunger friheten i att ge sig hän åt Open Higways, Öppna motorvägar, på väg mot en okänd frihet. Det hindrar dock inte att det kan röra sig om en färd blandad med oro, kanske skräck. Springsteen igen – Stolen car:

 

And I’m driving a stolen car
On a pitch black night
And I’m telling myself I’m gonna be alright
But I ride by night and I travel in fear
That in this darkness I will disappear

 

Och jag kör en stulen bil

genom en becksvart natt

och jag säger mig själv: Du kommer att klara det.

Men, jag kör om natten och färdas i fruktan

över att jag skall försvinna i detta mörker.

 

Betrakta sekvensen från Hitchcocks Psycho med Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), som efter att ha stulit 40 000 dollar från sin arbetsgivare, till tonerna av Bernard Herrmans suggestiva musik, i sin bil genom en mörknande natt färdas mot sin död på Bates Motel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSlo44VO-lE&ab_channel=scaringeachother

 

Att någon sitter bakom ratten på en bil är för övrigt en av amerikansk films vanligaste screen shots. I USA tycks det som om bilen för många har blivit en integrerad av deras personlighet. En vän bosatt i USA sa mig en gång att han skulle satsa sina surt förvärvade slantar på en ny, lyxig bil, detta trots att han egentligen inte alls hade råd med det. Då jag undrade varför han gjorde en så korkad investering svarade han, en bil förlorar i värde redan då man kör den hem från bilhandlaren. Han svarade: ”Jag måste kunna se mina barn i ögonen. Jag vill inte att de skall skämmas över att ha en loser till far. En usling som inte ens har råd med den ordentlig bil.”

 

Minns hur jag då jag besökte en av mina svägerskor i Miami fann att det i hennes villakvarter inte fanns några trottoarer och hur jag under mina promenader kände hur hennes grannar misstänksamt följde mig med blickarna, där de ruvade bakom sina gardiner eller klippte sina redan välansade gräsmattor. En fotgängare! Det måste röra sig om en skum individ, även om han är vit och relativt anständigt klädd.

 

Stephen King är en författare som väl motsvarar slipstreambegreppet Jag känner få författare som från en alldaglig realism kring The American Way kan skapa skräck utifrån alla de gadgets som omger landets invånare; mobiltelefoner, datamaskiner, gräsklippare, krocketklubbor, matberedningsmaskiner, ugnar och givetvis – bilar. På ett ögonblick kan hans karaktärer tvingas uppleva hur deras trygga tillvaro förvandlas till ett obegripligt och oförutsägbart helvete där de tvingas stå öga mot öga med demoniska krafter i något som kan tyckas vara ett parallellt universum.

 

Hos King är bilar emellanåt dödsmaskiner som besätter sina ägare, som en Plymouth Fury Christine, en Buick Roadmaster From a Buick 8, eller en Mercedes Benz Mr. Mercedes, för att inte tala om de galna lastbilarna i Kings egenhändigt regisserade kalkonfilm Maximum Overdrive.

 

Kanske är det sammanblandningen av frihet, sex, bilar och död som i USA givit upphov till en subgenre av actionfotografering – bilolycksbilder. Med mästare som Artur Fellig (Wegee):

 

Och mexikanen Enrique Metinides:

 

Även Andy Warhol, som med sitt stora intresse för kommersialism, känslokyla, sex och död möjligen kan betraktas urtypen för Zygmunt Baumans ”utanför stående” konstnär, ägnade en mängd konstverk åt bilolyckor.

 

Warhol var också fascinerad av kändisskap och dess roll för glamour och kommersialism, något som även det har färgat av sig på kulten kring bilar och bilolyckor, med offer som James Dean – ”lev hårt och dö ung”.

 

Eller Jackson Pollock, kanske även han kan betraktas som en Slipstreamer:

 

För mig tycks det som om den moderna målaren inte kan uttrycka den här tidsåldern, flygplanet, atombomben, radion, i renässansens formspråk, eller med uttryck lånade från någon annan, tidigare kultur. Varje ålder hittar sin egen teknik. [...] Enligt min uppfattning arbetar den moderne konstnären med, och speglar en inre värld – med andra ord ... han uttrycker energi, rörelse och andra inre krafter.

 

När teknologin väl gjort sitt inträde i den mänskliga sfären; från eld och hjul till tryckpressar, tåg, radio, flyg, TV, Intranät, sofistikerade vapen och … bilar, förändras allas vår tillvaro i en omfattning som är svår att omfatta och redogöra för. Bilar uppfanns som ett fortskaffningsmedel, men som vi sett ovan har de blivit så mycket mer, bland annat en inkarnation för våra mer eller mindre dolda begär. Om vi varit bättre intellektuellt utvecklade, mer moraliskt inriktade, kanske vi hade kunnat utnyttja vår sofistikerade teknologi för bättre ändamål. Nu tycks den istället hota oss, som om vi i hög hastighet färdades i en bil mot en slutgiltig olycka, en krasch. Felet finns inte hos våra redskap, det vilar inom oss.

 

Då jag skriver detta kommer jag att tänka på att Bruce Sterling är en stor beundrare av James Graham Ballard och har nämnt honom som en utmärkt föregångare för samtida Slipstream författare. För några år sedan rotade jag min vana trogen bland böckerna på ett bord i FAOs foyer där folk brukar placera begagnade böcker och fann där J.G. Ballards roman Crash. Jag kände enbart författaren som skaparen av Solens rike som låg till grund för Spielbergs film med samma namn och erinrade mig vagt att den otäcke, men likväl skicklige och fascinerande David Cronenberg hade gjort en film med samma namn som romanen jag höll i min hand.

 

Det visade sig att mitt antagande varit riktigt, men jag har sällan läst en så otäck, ja … äcklig roman som Ballards Crash. Eftersom jag nu inte kan finna den någonstans bland mina böcker befarar jag att jag har slängt den och börjar anse att om så varit fallet var det antagligen ganska dumt gjort. Även om det gått flera år sedan jag läste Crash har den stannat i minnet och då inte som en perverterad avart utan faktiskt som en intressant skildring av vår samtids vansinne och dess sammanblandning av kropp, psyke, sex, dödsdrift och högteknologi. Att jag började leta efter hans bok beror på att Ballard alltmer kommit att hyllas som en outsider som tidigt insett och kunnat formulera vart vårt samhälle är på väg. I en av sina romaner, Cocaine Nights, konstaterade han:

 

Konsumtionssamhället hungrar efter sådant som är avvikande och oväntat. Vad skulle det annars vara som driver de alltmer bisarra infallen inom en underhållningsindustri som får oss att inhandla och konsumera alltmer? […] Det finns inte mycket kvar som förmår att väcka och egga människor … möjligen brott, ytterligheter och aggressivitet – med vilket jag inte menar något som är direkt illegalt, utan sådant som gynnar vår jakt efter upplevelser som förmår stimulera vårt nervsystem, få pulsen att slå hårdare, få synapser som dövats av inaktivitet att elektrifieras.

 

Det sjukdomstillstånd som Ballards Crash handlar om har ett namn – symphorofilia, från grekiskan symphora, olycka, och innebär att den drabbade blir sexuellt upphetsad genom att arrangera eller bevittna en våldsam tragedi, exempelvis en bilolycka. Termen skapades faktiskt tjugo år efter det att Ballards bok kommit ut. John William Money (1921-2006) identifierade åkomman som en extrem form av parahphilia, det vill säga ett sjukligt begär efter sexuell stimulans från föremål eller varelser som hos normala personer i allmänhet inte väcker perverterade begär och leder till moraliskt förkastliga handlingar.

 

Inom parentes sagt var Money, som var professor i pediatrik och medicinsk psykologi vid det ansedda John Hopkins University i Baltimore, även han ett offer för teknologins inverkan på fixa idéer. John Money var världsberömd expert på sexuell identitet och könsroller, med intersexualism, eller s.k. transgender, som sin specialitetHans betydelse för genusforskning har blivit epokgörande, bland annat genom att introducera termer som gender identity, genusidentitet, genus role, genusroll och sexual orientation, sexuell orientering.

 

Som specialist på ”könsidentitet” rekommenderade Money emellanåt kirurgiska ingrepp och hormonbehandlingar för att åstadkomma genomgripande könsbyten, på såväl barn, som unga män och kvinnor. Något som för flera av hans patienter fick katastrofala följder då de vuxit upp och funnit att deras svävande könsidentitet enbart varit en del av en psykologisk mognadsprocess. Denna del av Moneys verksamhet resulterade i en upprörande bok av journalisten John Colapinto som sätter fingret på medicinsk arrogans och missriktad vetenskap – As Nature Made Him.

 

Som en försmak till vansinnet i Crash och i efterföljd av Andy Warhol organiserade Ballard 1970 en utställning med bilder på bilolyckor med dödlig utgång. De visades utan kommentarer och väckte en våldsam uppståndelse.

 

Ballards fascination inför ämnet kulminerade tre år senare med romanen Crash. Då jag läste den var jag oförberedd på denna orgie av död, våld och sex, skriven av någon som tycktes vara fullkomligt utlämnande då det gällde sin fixering vid vad jag uppfattade som en ohämmad perversion. En uppenbar psykopat som frossade i ett sjukligt idisslande kring varje upptänkligt sätt som mänskliga kroppsdelar och vätskor kan sammanblandas med de förvridna metalldelarna efter en bilolycka. Sida upp och sida med noggrant beskrivna sexscener, ständigt i samband med bilkörning och bilolyckor. Ett sceneri lika instängt och groteskt förvridet som de Sades i längden sterila och enformiga romaner, fullkomligt i avsaknad som de är av glädje och medkänsla.

 

Hos Ballard blir erotiken förtingligad, profanerad, kommersialiserad och banaliserad, frigjord från naturen förenas den med teknologi och mekanik. Chockeffekten mattas, kvar blir enbart förundran över att någon har förmått skriva något sådant. Minns inte om jag läste ut romanen.

 

Historien berättas av en person med samma namn som författaren. Han bor liksom Ballard gjorde i Shepperton en förstad till London, i närheten till en av motorvägarna ut mot Heathrows flygplats. Även om Ballard medvetet grumlar likheterna förstår läsaren att det finns ett samband mellan huvudpersonens och författarens fascination inför våldsamma bilolyckor. Romanens berättare attraheras, sexuellt såväl som intellektuellt, av en tidigare ”TV-vetenskapsman” som förvandlats till en ”motorvägarnas mardrömsängel” och med en bil försedd med polisradio försöker uppsöka varje fruktansvärd olycka som rapporteras över den. Orimligt upphetsad dyker han upp med sina kameror och frossar i blod och vrakdelar.

 

Ballard blir efter det att han skadats svårt i en trafikolycka närmare bekant med den demoniske olyckshabituén och snart har han sällat sig till ett sällskap av alienerade galningar, överlevare från andra olyckor, som slaviskt följer den perverterade symphorofiliagalningen under hans jakt efter katastrofer. Efterhand bidrar det groteska gänget med att iscensätta trafikolyckor ofta med dödlig utgång både för dem själva och deras offer. Ledarens yttersta önskan är att själv dö i en frontalkrock med Elizabeth Taylor.

 

Efter det att de chockerande osmakligheterna sjunkit undan har jag börjat fundera kring Crash och det är därför jag nu förgäves sökt efter den. Kanske var det så att Ballard trots allt var kritiskt inställd till det som han så ingående beskrev? Vad han försökte uttrycka genom sin perversa brutalitet var kanske inget annat än en kritik av de känslolösa omgivningar och tänkande som en överteknologiserad kultur har skapat. Hur den har invaderat och förgiftat inte enbart vårt tänkande utan även våra kroppar och vårt undermedvetna driftsliv.

 

Möjligen handlar Crash om hur människor skadats av djupgående depressioner som följt på svårartade, djupt traumatiska upplevelser. Hur de har alieneras från verkligheten och fallit offer för en depraverad besatthet som förvärrats efter det att de har mött någon som haft liknande upplevelser och smittats av samma dolda drifter, En såväl intellektuellt som sexuell symbios gör så att de tillsammans förlorar all kontroll och hänger kropp och själ åt det mest förbjudna. En tillvaro där allt och alla utnyttjas inom en fullkomligt perverterad omgivning, där deras förvridna driftsliv gynnas av en människofientlig teknologi som obevekligt orsakat en drift vars slutmål är detsamma för oss alla – Döden.

 

Yoko Ogamas Minnespolisen är fjärran från det frenetiska vansinnet i Ballards Crash, men Bruce Sterling säkerligen ha karaktäriserat även hennes roman som en slipstreamprodukt. Den utspelar sig i en hamnstad på en isolerad ö, som dock tycks var stor och självförsörjande. Få ting antyder att den inte skulle utspela sig i nutid – där finns bilar, tåg, affärer, institutioner, skolor och bibliotek. Människor, vanor och infrastruktur ger intryck av att spegla panska förhållanden, men det finns subtila förskjutningar som gör Minnespolisen till en slipstreamroman som väcker associationer till andra verk som Orwells 1984 och Bradburys Fahrenheit 451, fast enligt min mening är Ogams roman med sin stillsamt lyiska berättarton fullkomligt unik.

 

Kanske är Ogama del av en speciell japansk berättarådra som jag tror mig ha funnit hos författare som Kobo Abe och alldeles speciellt i en roman av Taichi Yamada, Främlingar. I Yamadas roman hamnar en TV-manusförfattare efter ett misslyckat äktenskap i en väldig byggnad i Tokyos centrum. Större delen av lägenheterna har på grund av oöverstigliga hyror övergetts av sina tidigare hyresgäster och gjorts om till kontorslokaler, något som gör att manusförfattaren om nätterna är så gott som ensam i den för övrigt tomma byggnaden. Han plågas av mardrömmar och minnen av sin svunna kärlek och trygghet, har svårt att sova och strövar omkring i ett Tokyo som om natten får en spöklig karaktär. På en bar träffar han sin sedan länge avlidne far och blir hembjuden till sitt forna föräldrahem där han bjuds på middag av sin döda mor. Det tykcs som om det i det toppmoderna existerar en parallellvärld där det förgångna fortlever. Då huvudpersonen om nätterna återvänder till sin lägenhet får han ibland besök av en vacker kvinna som tycks var en av de får kvarvarande hyresgästerna i en byggnad där mannen enbart brukar sammanträffa med portvakten.

 

Flera japanska skräckfilmer, myter och sagor antyder att Japan är befolkat av spöken, andar och demoner, kanske en reflektion av en urgammal tro på kamis, ett begrepp som möjligen kan tolkas som ”naturgudar” eller ”andar”. Kamis kan inneslutas av såväl djur och männsikor, som olika föremål och hemsöka speciella platser. Liksom Yamadas nattliga Tokyo är Ogawas ö en plats bortom den vardag vi är vana vid.

 

Till skillnad från de begärsbesatta galningarna i Ballards Crash är människorna i Ogawas Minnespolisen i allmänhet goda och omtänksamma. Samtliga är dock underkastade tyranniet från en mystisk Minnespolis, som beväpnad och uniformsklädd far omkring med bepansrade fordon. Dt finns också en ständigt närvarande och obegriplig, men till synes tillmötesgående, byråkrati som tjänar en repressionen. Var och vilka statens styresmän är får vi aldrig veta. Avde för oss okända orsaker har de de styrande har fullkomligt isolerat sitt örike från omvärlden och strävar efter att från dess invånare utplåna samtliga minnen. Med jämna mellanrum kommer exempelvis dekret om att alla rosor skall försvinna, en annan dag kan det röra sig om fåglar eller böcker. Det tycks som om såväl kultur som natur slaviskt åtföljer dekreten – floder och havsstränder fylls av rosenblad, stora fågelflockar lämnar ön . En morgon kan öns befolkning vakna upp och finna att de förlorat sitt doftsinne, eller att all fågelsång tystnat. Som om de vill att förlusten skall bli total förstör de frivilligt förbjudna växter, böcker och andra ting som Minnespolisen har för avsikt att utplåna.

 

Minnespolisen härjar fritt och möter inget motstånd. De för bort människor som vägrar följa direktiv och/eller visar tecken på att inte kunna, eller vilja glömma. De bortförda återkommer inte. Det ryktas att de förts till anstalter där man forskar för att finna och utplåna de gener och hjärnfunktioner som skapar och stödjer minnesfunktioner. Även om människor är passiva och tiger, finns det en del av dem gömmer misstänka minnesförbrytare.

 

Ogamas roman är lyrisk och vacker, med begåvad med en stillsam och sällsamt sordinerad berättarröst. Berättaren är en ung författarinna vars föräldrar, en ornitolog och en konstnärinna, har förts bort av minnespolisen, som även rannsakat hennes hem. Hennes bästa vän och förtrogne är en gammal sjökapten som bor på en rostande och oanvänd färja förankrad i hamnen. Tillsammans med honom har hon i sitt hem gömt sin förläggare som visat sig ha ett osvikligt minne. Dold i ett lönnrum försöker han förtvivlat få sjökaptenen och författaren att bevara och odla sina minnen. Ett hopplöst företag eftersom de bortsett från att hålla förläggaren dold laglydigt följer Minnespolisens absurda direktiv. Under historiens lopp sprider sig armod och tristess över ön alltmedan naturen också tycks ge upp, snö faller och vintern blir aldrig vår, människor förlorar föremål, bekvämlighet, självförtroende, minnen medan allt obeveklighet rör sig mot en allomfattande tomhet, total utplåning.

 

Minnespolisen är varken en lång eller svårläst roman. En sällsynt pärla med subtila skiftningar och en utsökt yta som väcker minnen av japanska träsnitt, Shindos filmer och Kawabatas naturskildringar. Under sin skenbara enkelhet döljer romanen tankedjup som kräver eftertanke och omläsning.

 

Läsningen av Ogama var det frö som i mitt medvetande fick en mängd tankar och associationer att spira. En del har jag nu redogjort för, men det finns åtskilligt mer att finna och inspireras av i Minnespolisen och jag kan intet annat än rekommendera er att läsa den.

 

Aldiss, Brian (1982) Frankenstein Unbound. New York: HarperCollins. Ballard, J. G. (2001) Crash. London: Picador. Bauman, Zygmunt (2006) Liquid Times: Living in an Age of Uncertainty. Cambridge: Polity. Burke, Edmund (1998) A Philosophical Enquiry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Carrington, Leonora (2017) Down Below. New York: NYRB Classics. Chirico, Giorgio de (1992) Hebdomeros. Cambridge: Exact Change. Colapinto, John (2006) As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised As A Girl. New York: Harper Perennial. Ende, Michael (2007) Momo eller kampen om tiden: En sagoroman. Stockholm: Berghs. Flood, Alison (2011) ”Getting more from RR Martin,” The Guardian, 14 April. Gray, John (2003) Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. London: Granta Books. Kavan, Anna (1970) Ice. London: Picador. King, Stephen (2011) 11/22/63. New York: Scribner. Kubin, Alfred (2014) The Other Side. Sawtry: Daedalus. Martin, George R. R. (2011) Kampen om järntronen. Stockholm: Månpocket. Money, J. (1984) ”Paraphilias: Phenomenology and classification,” American Journal of Psychotherapy. No. 38 (2). Ogawa, Yoko (2020) The Memory Police. London: Vintage. Ross, Clifford (ed.) (1990) Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics. New York: Abrahams. Strindberg, August (1996) Tjänstekvinnans son III-IV, Samlade verk 21. Stockholm: Norstedts. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel (2014) On Fairy-stories. New York: HarperCollins. Tyler, Malone (2017) ”A Field of Strangeness: Anna Kavan´s Ice and the Merits of World Blocking,” Los Angeles Review of Books. Vesaas, Tarjei (2020) Isslottet. Stockholm: Norstedts. Yamada, Taichi (2003) Strangers. London: Faber & Faber.

 

11/21/2020 20:24

During these COVID months, when tragedies are exacerbated by the pandemic's overshadowing thundercloud, I open the door to my Inner Room. A place that strangely enough has been described in one of the few poems written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes´s creator:

 

It is mine – the little chamber,

mine alone.

I had it from my forbears

years agone.

Yet within its walls

I see a most motley company

and they one and all claim me

as their own.

 

 

Conan Doyle tells us that it is the place where each of us keeps our most personal memories and thoughts.

 

Now, when loneliness and isolation are spreading all around us, it happens that the door to that room is opened quite often – while young and old are trapped and live alone in apartments and nursing homes, while computers and TVs spread hopelessness and despair.

 

 

Others have chosen to live together, but not as now for twenty-four hours, day and night, whereby there is a great risk they begin to gnaw on each other's nerves and souls.

 

 

Death and disease, which previously had been awaiting their turn outside the Inner Room, are now making their entrance. During isolation the body's presence becomes increasingly noticeable and thus its ailments and diseases. Mobile phones and computers inform us about how loved ones are consumed by troubles and maladies. How emptiness engulfs the world around us. A new era of cold, ice and desolation is apparently turning up at our doorstep.

 

 

The Inner Room may take on the appearance of being like one of those Southern, darkened church interiors where black-clad widows kneel in front of murky altarpieces and silently lament past times; mourning dead friends and family members.

 

 

In the inner room dwells the Black Dog of Melancholy. Nietzsche writes in The Joyous Science:

 

My dogI have given a name to my pain and call it “dog”: it is just as faithful, just as obtrusive and shameless, just as entertaining, just as clever as any other dog – and I can scold it and vent my bad moods on it, as others do with their dogs, servants, and wives.

 

 

Creatures like the Pain Dog also reside in computers and televisions. Several of them are not at all harmless – they seem to have joined forces with COVID-19 and grown into an increasing threat to humanity. One such creature is named Donald J. Trump, others bear names such as Jair Bolsanero, Vladimir Putin, Recep Erdogan, Muhammed bin Salman, Rodrigo Dutete, Benjamin Netanyahu, Viktor Orbán, Kim Jong-Un, or Matteo Salvini. I do not know where they all come from. Outer Space might be a good explanation, but unfortunately there are seeds for such creations within each and every one of us. I guess what such persons all have in common is a boundless love for the sweetness of power. I find them scary, but there are those who believe they are awesome.

 

 

I apologize for my insistence on quoting Nietzsche. Several regard him as a forerunner of Fascism, a god-denying despiser of humans, who praised "blonde beasts", violence and ruthlessness. I have not actually read him as such, but as a philosopher who in his own words was "human, all too human". Reading Nietzsche can be like diving into an abyss of contradictory madness, where good and evil coexist. After such deep dives, it may happen that I reach the surface again with one or another pearl of wisdom. Nietzsche is a master of opposites. Listen, for example, to what he writes about the Will to Power, which murderers like Hitler and Mussolini thought they had found a defender in him:

 

I have found strength where one does not look for it: in simple, mild, and pleasant people, without the least desire to rule—and, conversely, the desire to rule has often appeared to me a sign of inward weakness: they fear their own slave soul and shroud it in a royal cloak (in the end, they still become the slaves of their followers, their fame, etc.).

 

 

To me, power drunk people constitute a disturbing presence in the dark corners of the Inner Room. They are frighteningly through their superficiality, soullessness, cynicism and selfishness. Where they loom in the dusk, they appear as menacing mannequins.

 

Eins, Zwei, Drei, Vier
We are standing here.
exposing ourselves

We are showroom dummies.

We are showroom dummies.

 

We're being watched
and we feel our pulse.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We look around
and change our pose.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We start to move

and we break the glass.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We step out
and take a walk through town.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We go into a club
and there we start to dance.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJ9Stc9ONyY&ab_channel=scatmanjohn3001

 

I assume these powerful human mannequins, just like Nietzsche have their companion dogs. However, with them such a dog cannot be called Pain, but rather Ego. Within powerful narcissists, such beasts are not locked up within any Inner Rooms, but ravage freely within their owners´ bodies, brains and hearts. When such ego-dogs are released, they do like COVID-19 invade the narcissist's entire organism and then spread throughout society, until soullessness becomes endemic. A pandemic that Pope Francis I has described as Global Indifference. Unfortunately, it is not a new disease. In one of Goya's etchings from the series Disastres de la Guerra, a couple of men watch some starving poor people while asking themselves: "Maybe they are of a different lineage?"

 

 

In the Inner Room, however, there is also comfort and strength to be found. There is, for example, music, and as Nietzsche pointed out: "Without music, life would be a mistake". I have now slightly opened the door to my Inner Room and music is streaming out. It comes from an operetta with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein and music by Sigmund Romberg. It expresses love between two life partners:

 

Marianne:

You went away, I let you.

We broke the ties that bind.

I wanted to forget you

and leave the past behind.

Still the magic of the night I met you

seems to stay for ever in my mind.

 

The sky was blue,

and high above

the moon was new,

and so was love.

 

This eager heart of mine was singing:

Lover, where can you be?”

You came at last,

love had its day:

That day is past,

you´ve gone away:

 

This aching heart of mine is singing:

Lover, come back to me!”

Rememb´ring ev´ry little thing you

used to say and do.

I´m so lonely!

Ev´ry road I´ve walked along I´ve walked

along with you.

No wonder I am lonely!

 

The sky is blue.

The night is cold,

The moon is new,

but love is old.

 

And while I´m waiting here

this heart of mine is singing:

Lover come back to me!”

 

The sky was blue

and high above

the moon was new,

and so was love.

 

This eager heart of mine was singing:

Lover, where can you be?”

 

Robert:

You came at last,

love had its day:

That day is past,

you´ve gone away:

 

This aching heart of mine is singing:

Lover, come back to me!”

Ev´ry road I´ve walked along I´ve walked

along with you.

No wonder I am lonely!

 

Marianne:

Rememb´ring ev´ry little thing you

used to say and do.

I´m so lonely!

And while I´m waiting here

this heart of mine is singing:

Lover come back to me!”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5o3pxVzonw&ab_channel=the5thelemen

 

Conan Doyle, Arthur (2013) Songs of Action. Amsterdam: Fredonia Books. Kaufmann, Werner (1975) Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press. Nietzsche, Friedrich (2018The Joyous Science. London: Penguin Classics. Nietzsche, Friedrich (1990The Twilight of the Idols and the Anti-Christ: or How to Philosophize with a Hammer. London: Penguin Classics.

 

11/21/2020 15:30

Under dessa COVIDmånader då varje tragedi förvärras av pandemins allt överskuggande åskmoln, öppnar jag dörren till vad den finlandssvenske och tidigt bortgångne poeten Christer Lind kallat innanrummet. Platsen där var och en av oss förvarar våra högst personliga minnen och tankar.

 

 

Nu då ensamhet och isolering breder ut sig händer det att dörren ditin gläntas allt oftare – alltmedan unga och gamla sitter instängda i lägenheter och äldreboenden, under det att datorer och TV-apparater sprider hopplöshet och förtvivlan.

 

 

Andra har valt att leva tillsammans, men inte som nu tjugofyra timmar om dygnet, varigenom risk är stor att de gnager på varandras själar.

 

 

Död och sjukdomar, som tidigare väntat utanför innanrummet, gör nu sin entré. Under isolering blir kroppens närvaro allt påtagligare och därmed även krämpor och sjukdomar. Mobiler och datorer berättar om hur nära och kära förtärs av sådant och hur tomheten växer. En ny tid av köld, is och ödslighet står tydligen för dörren.

 

 

Innanrummet kan ge intryck av att vara som ett av dessa sydländska. mörklagda kyrkorum där svartklädda änkor bedjande knäböjer inför mörknade altartavlor och i tysthet beklagar flydda tider; döda vänner och familjemedlemmar.

 

 

innanrummet bor melankolins svarta hund. Nietzsche skriver i Den glada vetenskapen:

 

Min hund. - Jag har gett min smärta ett namn och kallar den "hunden" - den är lika trogen, lika påträngande och skamlös, lika underhållande, lika klok som varje annan hund – och jag kan ryta åt den och låta mitt dåliga humör gå ut över den: precis som andra gör med sina hundar, tjänare och kvinnor.

 

Varelser som smärtohunden vistas även i datorer och TV-apparater. Flera av dem är inte alls harmlösa – de tycks ha förenat sig med COVID-19 och vuxit till ett allt större hot mot mänskligheten. En sådan varelse heter Donald J. Trump, andra bär namn som Jair Bolsanero, Vladimir Putin, Recep Erdogan, Muhammed bin Salman, Rodrigo Dutete, Benjamin Netanyahu,Viktor Orbán, Jimmie Åkesson, Kim Jong-Un, eller Matteo Salvini. Inte vet jag var de kommer ifrån. Yttre rymden vore möjligen en bra förklaring, men dessvärre finns frön till sådana skapelser inom var och en av oss. Jag antar att gemensamt för dem alla är den gränslösa kärlek de hyser till maktens sötma. Jag finner dem skrämmande, men det finns de som tycker de är underbara.

 

Ni får ursäkta att jag envisas med att citera Nietzsche. Många betraktar honom som en föregångare till fascismen, en gudsförnekande människoföraktare, som hyllade ”blonda bestar”, våld och hänsynslöshet. Jag har faktiskt inte läst honom som en sådan, utan som en filosof som med sina egna ord var ”mänsklig, alltför mänsklig”. Att läsa Nietzsche kan vara som att dyka ner i människosjälens motstridiga vansinne, där gott och ont samsas. Efter sådana djupdykningar kan det hända att jag kommer upp till ytan med en eller annan tankepärla. Nietzsche är en motsatsernas mästare. Lyssna exempelvis till hur han skriver om den vilja till makt som mördare som Hitler och Mussolini trodde sig ha funnit hos honom:

 

Jag har funnit styrka där jag inte sökt den: hos enkla, milda och trevliga människor, utan minsta önskan att härska – och omvänt. Önskan att behärska andra har för mig ofta avslöjat sig som tecken på inre svaghet: de som ansatts av ett sådant önskemål fruktar sin egen slavnatur och höljer den i en kunglig mantel (i slutändan blir de sina anhängares slavar, beroende av den berömmelse de skänkt dem, etc.).

 

 

För mig utgör maktmänniskor en oroande närvaro i innanrummets mörka vrår. De skrämmer genom sin ytlighet, själslöshet, cynism och egoism. Där de ruvar i dunkelt framstår de som mannekänger eller skyltdockor.

 

Eins, Zwei, Drei, Vier
We are standing here.
exposing ourselves

We are showroom dummies.

We are showroom dummies.

 

We're being watched
and we feel our pulse.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We look around
and change our pose.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We start to move

and we break the glass.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We step out
and take a walk through town.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

We go into a club
and there we start to dance.

We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.
We are showroom dummies.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJ9Stc9ONyY&ab_channel=scatmanjohn3001

 

 

Eins, Zwei, Drei, Vier

Vi står här

och exponerar oss själva.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

Man tittar på oss,

vi känner vår puls.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

Vi ser oss omkring

och ändrar hållning.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

Vi rör oss

och krossar glaset.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

Vi stiger ut

och går genom stan.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

Vi kommer till en klubb

där vi börjar dansa.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

Vi är skyltdockor.

 

 

Jag antar att dessa modedockor, dessa maktmänniskor, liksom Nietzsche har sina beledsagande hundar. Men, hos dem kan de inte kallas för Smärta, utan  snarare  Ego. Dessa bestar är hos dem inte inlåsta i några innanrum utan härjar fritt i makt-narcissisternas kroppar, hjärnor och hjärtan. Då sådana egohundar släppts fria invaderar de som COVID-19 narcissistens organism och sprider sig därefter genom hela samhällskroppen,  tills dess själlösheten blivit endemisk. En pandemi som av  påven  Francis I har benämnts Den globala likgiltigheten. Den är dessvärre inte ny, i en av Goyas etsningar från serien Disastres de la Guerra betraktar ett par män några svältande stackare medan de frågar sig: ”Kanske de är av en annan härstamning?”

 

I innanrummet finns dock även tröst och styrka. Där finns exempelvis musik och som Nietzsche påpekat: ”Utan musik skulle livet vara ett misstag”. Jag har nu gläntat dörren till innanrummet och ut strömmar musik från en operett med text av Oscar Hammerstein och musik av Sigmund Romberg. Den besjunger kärleken mellan två livsledsagare:

 

Marianne:

You went away, I let you.

We broke the ties that bind.

I wanted to forget you

and leave the past behind.

Still the magic of the night I met you

seems to stay for ever in my mind.

 

The sky was blue,

and high above

the moon was new,

and so was love.

 

This eager heart of mine was singing:

Lover, where can you be?”

You came at last,

love had its day:

That day is past,

you´ve gone away:

 

This aching heart of mine is singing:

Lover, come back to me!”

Rememb´ring ev´ry little thing you

used to say and do.

I´m so lonely!

Ev´ry road I´ve walked along I´ve walked

along with you.

No wonder I am lonely!

 

The sky is blue.

The night is cold,

The moon is new,

but love is old.

 

And while I´m waiting here

this heart of mine is singing:

Lover come back to me!”

 

The sky was blue

and high above

the moon was new,

and so was love.

 

This eager heart of mine was singing:

Lover, where can you be?”

 

Robert:

You came at last,

love had its day:

That day is past,

you´ve gone away:

 

This aching heart of mine is singing:

Lover, come back to me!”

Ev´ry road I´ve walked along I´ve walked

along with you.

No wonder I am lonely!

 

Marianne:

Rememb´ring ev´ry little thing you

used to say and do.

I´m so lonely!

And while I´m waiting here

this heart of mine is singing:

Lover come back to me!”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5o3pxVzonw&ab_channel=the5thelemen

 

Marianne:

Du lämnade mig, jag medgav det.

Vi släppte allt som band oss.

Jag ville glömma dig,

lämna allt bakom mig.

Men, nattens förtrollning då vi möttes

dröjer sig kvar hos mig.

 

Himlen var blå

och högt däruppe

var månen ny

och så var kärleken.

 

Mitt ivriga hjärta sjöng:

Älskade, var är du?”

Och du kom till slut,

kärleken fick sin dag:

men den förgick,

du är försvunnen:

 

Mitt sårade hjärta sjunger:

Älskade kom tillbaka!”

Jag minns allt du

sa och gjorde.

Jag är så ensam!

Varje väg vi tog

gick vi tillsammans.

Inte konstigt jag är ensam!

 

Himlen är blå,

natten kall

Månen är ny,

men kärleken död.

 

Och medan jag väntar här

sjunger mitt hjärta:

Älskade, kom tillbaka!”

 

Himlen var blå

och högt däruppe

var månen ny

och så var kärleken.

Mitt ivriga hjärta sjöng:

Älskade, var är du?”

 

Robert:

Och du kom till slut,

kärleken fick sin dag:

men den förgick,

du är försvunnen:

 

Mitt sårade hjärta sjunger:

Älskade kom tillbaka!”

Varje väg vi tog

gick vi tillsammans.

Inte konstigt jag är ensam!

 

Marianne:

Jag minns allt du

sa och gjorde.

Jag är så ensam!

Och medan jag väntar här

sjunger mitt hjärta:

Älskade, kom tillbaka!”

 

Kaufmann, Werner (1975) Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press. Nietzsche, Friedrich (2008) Den glada vetenskapen: Samlade skrifter, band. 5. Ågerup: Symposion. Nietzsche, Friedrich (2013) Avgudaskymning eller Hur man filosoferar med hammaren: Samlade skrifter, band 8. Ågerup: Symposion.

 

11/17/2020 12:41

Howlin´ Wolf, i.e Chester Arthur Burnett (1910-1976), was great in several meaning of the word. Not only was he one and ninety-eight centimeters tall, weighed one hundred and twenty-five kilograms and had fifty-one in shoe number. Howlin´ Wolf was also one of the greatest blues guitarists of all time, a resident of the blues' Parnassus where he shares company with the foremost among the Delta and Chicago blues men. As Louis Armstrong was jazz, Howlin´ Wolf was blues; a rhythmic genius who became part of a chain that connect and became the origin vast array of other musical gneres. An inspiration for giants like Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan and Iggy Pop, or unforgettable rock bands like Led Zeppelin, the Beatles and Rolling Stones. It was the great stones fan Stefan Tell who when we were classmates introduced me to Howlin´ Wolf. Since then, I have not tired of listening to Howlin´Wolf and the other blues masters of his generation – Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Elmore James and John Lee Hooker. All coming from the state of Mississippi, with hard lives behind them and roots deep down in the soil and misery of the South, whose strength, pain and depth they interpreted and spread through their masterful musicality.

 

 

No wonder when I recently in a magazine came across a drawing by Howling Wolf came to wonder if the great blues artist had been an able draftsman as well, but it turned out that it was not the great Chester Burnett who artist who created the artwork but a Cheyenne Indian who went by the same . What Chester Arthur Burnett had in common with the Wolf maybe not more than the name, ythogh both had in reality another the name. The one of the Cheyenne's was Ho-na-nist-to. Another unifying factor was, of course, that they both belonged to population groups that often have been victims of the contempt from many members of the "white" majority of their country. In addition, Chester Arthur Burnett, like many other blacks from The Deep South, had some Native American ancestry – his grandfather was a Choktaw, the largest indigenous population of Mississippi.

 

 

Howling Wolf´s picture had been with ink and watercolor on a lined sheet similar to those in my childhood´s school notebooks. The colours and the sharp contour lines reminded me of the hundreds of drawings I used to sit and tinker with when I got home from school. A habit that I certainly shared with a lot of other children of my age. But Howling Wolf's drawings were based on a specific tradition and imbued with an elegant and ornamental character that made them far from being "childish". They were part of a genre I found to have been exercised by more artists than Howling Wolf. It was Native American prisoners who practiced this so-called ledger art, so-called because most of the preserved drawings had been made on pages from second-hand ledgers they had been given in the forts and penitentiaries where they had been incarcerated.

 

Soon I found several ledger artworks and while looking at them I remembered the great in Native American I nurtured during my childhood and early youth. I did not start speaking until several months after I had turned three and I did not learn how to read until I began school at seven years. However, after I started talking I have seldom kept quiet and as soon as I had learned to read I have at the slightest opportunity to do so devoured book after book, and continued to do so, becoming nervous if I do not have any reading material at hand.

 

 

Shortly after learning to read, I immersed myself in an all-encompassing interest in "wild animals" and "Indians." I stepped far into one "Indian adventure" after another and had soon absorbed all of Edward S. Ellis's books about Deer Foot. Those that were published by B. Wahlström's Youth Books and had green spines to indicate they were boys' reading. Girls´ books had red spines.

 

 

I owned a war bonnet and was particularly fond of a small rifle, I imagined it looked like the one Simon Kenton had owned, one of the heroes in the Deer Foot books, carrying it with him when he, in the early nineteenth century, with his friend, the Christian Shawnee Deerfoot, was sneeking around in the unpaved, primeval forests along the Kentucky and Ohio rivers. The fur trader and pathfinder Kenton and his faithful Indian friend were constantly threatened by unreliable and murderous warriors from the pagan Iroquois tribe, who, unlike the noble Deer Foot, hated white settlers, whom they gladly slaughtered as soon as they came across them.

 

 

I remember how I tried to make my steps as quiet av Deer Foot's when I passed through tmy childhood´s beech forests. I drew scenes from the Indian books and played with my Native American figurines in the mountain landscapes my father had for me by chicken nets and plaster. Since Dad was the night editor of the local paper he stayed at home during the day and when I came back from school he had time to play with me.

 

 

Of course, I also read Fenimore Cooper and Karl May and a lot of other authors who had written thrilling tales about Native American book and at the movie matinees I and my friends cheered when the redskins appeared. It was until when I received from my father received the yearbooks of Indianklubben. The Indian Club, that I began to realize who the Native Americans really had been and still are. Those books contained exciting and often outrageous depictions of a different reality than the one described in my adventure stories and Indians gradually became into “real” people.

 

 

I also read the Indianklubben´s “special editions”, such as George Catlin's fascinating Medicine Men and Warriors written in 1841, in which the artist Catlin sympathetically and with insight portrayed his travels among various Native American peoples living on the prairies, their lives and thoughts – open-minded and curious he succeeded iun describing their lifestyle in a manner that apperntly was free from paternalism and chauvinsim. When it was exhibited in Paris in 1846, none other than the great poet and art connoisseur Charles Baudelaire, became impressed by Catlin's portrait of Stu-mick-o-súcks, warlord of the Blackfeet Káínawa klan:

 

Mr. Catlin has in an excellent manner succeed in depicting the proud and straightforward character, as well as noble expression of this brave people. […] Through their beautiful appearance and the boldness of their body language, these savages make us realize the beauty of ancient sculptures. When it comes to colour, it has something mysterious about it that appeals to me more than I can express.

 

 

 

The chief's strange name was translated with the Bison's Back Fat, but it is not as strange as it sounds since the bison's back hump was considered to be a great delicacy and the name was thus an honorary title.

 

 

Another of The Indian Club's Best Choice was the Swedish author Albert Widén's The Swedes and the Sioux Uprising, a book that deepened what I already had learned from Stig Ericsson's fairly simple adventure story The Indian Rebellion. When I much later encountered the far superior Swedish author Vilhelm Moberg's emigrant epic, written between 1951 and 1961, I carried with me impressions from Widén's depictions of the cultural crash between Swedish settlers and the desperate Sioux warriors. In Moberg's Last Letter Home, there is a poignant description of the mass execution of thirty-eight Dakota warriors:

 

It was a cold winter morning with a biting Northern sweeping from the praries across the prison yard. The prisoners were brought out in a group, their hands tied behind their backs. Not one of them uttered a defiant word. As soon as they were in the yard they saw before them the large gallows with the rops swaying in the wind. Then a stir went through the group: They began to sing. All at one time. They were singing their death song in unison.

An eerie penetrating sound came from the condemned prisoners´ throats; it sounded like a prolonged ij: ijiji – ijiji – ijiji. One single syllable of complaint, the eternal, sad ijijiji – ijijiji – ijiji – ijiji. The Indians were singing their death song. It came from thirty-eight human throats, it was thirty-eight beings´final utterance: ijiji – ijiji -ijiji.

 

 

The prisoners approached the great gallow – the iron ring with the thirty-eight swinging ropes – and they sang uninterruptedly as they walked, they sang the whole way. They sang as they climbed the scaffold, they sang as they stood under the ropes, they continued to sing as the ropes were placed around their necks. They sang in their lives last minute.

 

 

Like Moberg's narrative, Widén's descriptions of Native Americans were based on a solid familiarity with preserved sources about Swedish American migration – letters, diaries and scientific literature. Nevertheless, Widén's storytelling is quite different from Moberg's and his tale is far too stereotyped for my taste, something I dound out when I now after fifty-fours years reared his book and numerous articles in the yearbooks of the Indianklubben.

 

I get the feeling that Widén that even if he tries to nuance older Native American representations and convey a positive image of the America´s indigenous peoples his views are hopelessly lost in tenacious conventions tinged by Swedish chauvinism, The last is apparent in his often repeated statements that Swedes in general revealed a great tolerance towards Sioux and other indigenous peoples, something that certainly not always have been the case. Likewise, Widén's efforts to nuance the "common image of the Indian" easily lapsed into the cliche of the "noble savage." A tendency that is noticeable in most of the essays in the Indian Club's yearbooks, which in addition were almost entirely male-dominated. When I flip through all 18 books in the series I only find contributions from two women.

 

 

Anyhow, Widén managed to convey the feeling of desperation among starving Sioux who had experienced how the bison have disappeared from their hunting grounds, while settlers cut down the forests, cultivated the land, fished in their waters and shot their game. When merchants and politicians cheated them of the treaty money and necessities they were promised when they gave up their land and equal rights, the patience of several Sioux and Cheyenne warriors broke down. A wave of violence swept across central and southern Minnesota. An estimated 800 settlers were killed, including several Swedes and Norwegians, while more than 30,000 fled to the east in panic, among them were at least 3,000 Swedish immigrants.

 

The counter-reaction of the US central government became violent and ruthless. It led to several massacres on the indigenous population and imprisonment of the "rebel leaders". Following a summary trial, 303 Dakota warriors were sentenced to death. Following a call for "mercy to prevail" Minnesota's Anglican Bishop Henry Whipple succeeded in persuading President Lincoln to sanction the public hanging of “only” 38 “mass murderers” in the town of Mankato. The verdict was executed on December 26, 1862. It is and was the largest collective mass execution that has taken place in the US. Significantly, it affected an entire group of people, instead of individuals. It was "Indians" who were executed, not people like you and me.

 

 

It is not easy to find the individual behind the templates, something I assume has been experienced by most fellow human beings belonging to more or less powerless population – to be constantly forced to carry a stamp on skin and soul as “Indian”, “Negro”, “Chinese”, “Alien”, “Infidel”, in other words – a stranger. Vine Deloria (1933-2005) who was a Sioux has described such a feeling in several books:

 

The problem of stereotyping is not so much a racial problem as it is a problem of limited perspective. Even through minority groups have suffered in the past by ridiculous characterizations of themselves by white society, they must not fall into the same trap by simply reversing the process that has stereotyped them. Minority groups must thrust through the rhetorical blockade by creating themselves a sense of ”peoplehood.” This ultimately means the creation of a new history and not mere amendments to the historical interpretation of white America.

 

 

The second volume in the book series The Best of the Indian Club was Thomas B. Marquis's  Wooden Leg: A Worrier Who Fought Custer. I was also prepared for that reading after reading an adventure book about Indians. In that case, it had been Harry Kullman's Buffalo Bill, which was actually more effectively and excitingly told than the Deer Foot books. For being written in the fifties it was also surprisingly nuanced in its description of Native Americans, maybe due to the fact that as writer for “young readers” Kullman did not hide his “socialist” convictions.

 

 

Kullman made me read Marquis' book, which was based on interviews with several elderly Cheyennes who had participated in the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, when all 235 soldiers from one of the Seventh Cavalry's three battalions, as well as their leader, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, were killed to the last man. The Hunkpapa-Lakota Sioux leader Gall, who Kullman in his novel wrongly claimed had been chased and eventually killed by Buffalo Bill, also took part in that battle. In fact, Gall escaped the revenge of the US Army by fleeing to Canada, where he actually was contacted by Buffalo Bill Cody who offered him amployment in his Wild West Show. Unlike Sitting Bull, Gall declined the offer, stating that “I am not an animal and can thus refuse to be exposed to a paying audience.” Gall later returned to the United States where became both a settled farmer and a judge, before dying in 1895.

 

 

It was when Thomas Marquis was working as a doctor in various reservations for indigenous people of Montana that he came in contact with Cheyennes who had taken part in the so-called Great Sioux War, which included the Battle of Little Bighorn. Several of Marquis' informants were excellent narrators and his account of their experiences, as well as his own research into the customs and practices of the Cheyenne, became exciting reading for young Indian fan.

 

In early 1922, the Marquis ended up in the Indian Agency of the Lame Deer Reservation, where he opened a medical practice. Most of his patients were poor and in an appalling state of health, abandoned and without illusions. In addition, Dr. Marquis appeared during an unusually extensive tuberculosis epidemic, which during his time in the reserve during several years reaped an elevated number of casualties.

 

At first the Cheyenne were distrustful of the white doctor. However, when Marquis showed them understanding and respect and also demonstrated his interest in their customs and history, he won the trust of several of them. Those who could speak English put Marquis in touch with old warriors who could tell him about what interested him most of all – their war against the US army. Soon Marquis was able to speak the Cheyenne language, wrote down the stories of the ancients, and began publishing books about their lives and history. Below is a photo taken by Marquis presenting how the veterans Little Sun, Wolf Chief, Big Beaver and Richard Wooden Leg are studying a map of the area around the Little Big Horn. All had been present during the fight. In their hands they have fans made from eagle wings.

 

 

While I read about Marquis during these worrisome COVID-19 times, I find that it was its deadly predecessor, The Spanish Flu, which between March 1918 and June 1920 harvested between 50 and 100 million deaths worldwide, which brought Thomas B. Marquis to Montana. As a young doctor, he had volunteered to participate in what eventually became World War I, but instead of being sent to France Marquis had to care of recruits who dying like flies in a camp near the city of Lytle in Georgia.

 

In Haskell County, a municipality with 1,720 inhabitants, Dr. Loring Miner had in February 1918 found that a number of his patients had contracted an aggressive influenza which for several of them developed into a form of fatal pneumonia. Loring suspected that the disease was spreading from sick pigs and in a detailed report communicated his concerns to the authorities. Loring suspected that he had discovered the source of what might develop into an extremely contagious and deadly epidemic. His warnings were ignored.

 

At Funston, fifty miles from Haskell, was a huge military camp with more than 56,000 recruits waiting to be shipped to the French battlefields. Several Haskell residents visited sons and relatives in the camp and soon soldiers began to die of pneumonia. On March 18, the infection reached the Forrest and Greenleaf Camps in Georgia, where the army sent Thomas Marquis.

 

 

When Thomas Marquis in August 1918 finally arrived in Europe, he was sent as an "expert on the Spanish Flu" to the large hotels on the French Riviera, which now served as hospitals for terminally ill soldiers. When Marquis in June 1919 returned to the US, he too was seriously ill with the deadly flu. When he had recovered Marquis wanted to get as far away as possible from soldiers and mass deaths and thus ended up in remote Montana.

 

Among the Cheyenne, the Marquis found the prairie culture that has become the archetype of people's perception of the North American Indian, despite the wide variety of different cultures, customs, and languages ​​embraced by the Native Americans. It was a nomadic buffalo-hunting and horse dependent culture that had developed during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and came to shape the lives of population groups like the Sioux, Blackfoot, Apache, Arapaho and Cheyenne peoples.

 

 

If people in general imagine an “Indian”, they see a mounted figure with a magnificent war bonnet, an adventurously romantic appearance, which has become the symbol of a noble, unbound and eloquent character living in close contact and harmony with nature. Nevertheless, that image also has its obverse in howling lunatics whose reckless murderous and scalping bestiality afflicted hapless settlers, who if they were fortunate enough could be rescued by Blue Coats in the service of US Army´s audacious and heroic cavalry.

 

 

The horse and the buffalo had radically changed the way of life of the Cheyenne. Like several other Prairie Indians, they had previously lived in forest areas south of the vast lakes of Michigan and Erie, where they had subsisted on crops of corn, zucchini, beans and rice, as well as fishing, hunting and gathering what they found in the forest. During the seventeenth century they had begun to move westward, probably forced to do so due to strife and displacement caused by the expansion of the well-organized Iroquois.

 

Struggles between Native American groups were apparently endemic and marked by raids into neighboring territories, kidnappings, ritual torture, and envy that could be manifested through violent cruelty. However, this did not prevent traditional “enemies” from spending time in peaceful coexistence. As in several other places in America, the Cheyenne lived in the neighborhood of other groups with languages that were incomprehensible to them, with different beliefs and traditions, something that nevertheless did not hinder marriages, as well as the exchange of ideas, experiences and goods.

 

Like many other groups of Native Americans, the Cheyenne believed it had been a prophet who once had made them change their way of life. Tomȯsévėséhe, Upright Horn, had been bestowed a vision telling him that the Cheyenne, like the people of the prairies, must unite and find strength though the Sun. By the end of spring they the entire Cheyenne nation had to gather to seek wisdom and insights through the purification and power bestowed upin them by the almighty Sun. After undergoing such an experience, Tomȯsévėséhe had became a medicine man, realizing that the Cheyenne had to leave the huts of plait and clay in which they were living and instead make conical teepes made out of buffalo hides, which they could bring with them while following the bison's migrations. From now on, Cheyenne would eat buffalo meat instead of fish and vegetables. They would become feared warriors, strengthened by insights and experiences gained during the Sundance.

 

 

As they began to wander across the prairies, few Cheyenne had seen a white man, but they had heard about their arrival in the East and how it had brought about great changes and killed the unfortunate people affected by the devastating presence of the Whites. It was not only through their numbers and the deadly weapons that the Whites had brought with them across the Eastern Sea, that killed and displaced the rightful owners of the land, but it was mainly the evil medicine they were spreading that caused unimaginable misery. Smallpox, influenza, whooping cough, typhus and a host of other previously unknown diseases were killing huge numbers of victims among indigenous peoples. At an incomprehensible speed entire villages were wiped out.

 

 

As the Cheyenne and other ethnic groups in increasing numbers moved across the prairies, they encountered huge herds of bison. An estimated 60 million buffaloes roamed in herds that could include hundreds of thousands of individual animal. If the herds stampeded they made the ground vibrate. The roaring of the beasts and th galloping hooves of the panicked animals were by the people of plains called the Thunder of the Prairie. The extensive western savannas were also grazed by herds of feral horses coming from areas that further south had been conquered by Spanish warriors. Without natural enemies and plenty of food, the horses would had rapidly multiplied. They were called Mustangs, from the Spanish word mesteño, lost, and it was not long before the Indians managed to tame them, and in a surprisingly short time most of the prairie people had become astonishingly skilled riders, who effectively chased the numerous buffaloes from the horse backs. Soon the prairie people had adapted their entire culture and outlook on life to to this entirely new existence.

 

 

The Lakota Sioux John Tȟáȟča Hušté, Lame Fire Deer, (1903-1976) explained:

 

The buffalo gave us everything we needed. Without it we were nothing. Our tipis were made of his skin. His hide was our bed, our blanket, our winter coat. It was our drum, throbbing through the night, alive, holy. Out of his skin we made our water bags. His flesh strengthened us, became flesh of our flesh. Not the smallest part of it was wasted. His stomach, a red-hot stone dropped into it, became our soup kettle. His horns were our spoons, the bones our knives, our women's awls and needles. Out of his sinews we made our bowstrings and thread. His ribs were fashioned into sleds for our children, his hoofs became rattles. His mighty skull, with the pipe leaning against it, was our sacred altar. When you killed off the buffalo you also killed the Indian—the real, natural, "wild" Indian.

 

 

There was within Native American religiosity a prominent element of mysticism, meaning that in dreams, in solitude, and through traditional forms of self-torture, believers tried to enter the spirit worlds they assumed they were surrounded by. An experienced shaman could step in and out between different worlds. A Pawne song:

 

Sacred visions:

Now they pass across the threshold,

softly they slide

into the innermost.

Softly they glide – Holy Visions!

Entering the innermost.

 

It was a search for the meaning of life and our place in existence:

 

Let us see, is this real.

Let us see, is this real,

this life I am living?

You, gods, who dwell everywhere,

let us see if this is real,

This life I am living?

 

 

In the Spirit Worlds, the visionary met helpers and demons and he could himself be transformed into such creatures. As in this 1880 ledger drawing by the Lakota warrior and shaman Čhetáŋ Sápa', The Black Hawk. It depicts Heyókȟa, a trickster and thunder god who equipped with buffalo horns rides a horse-like creature, also with buffalo horns and eagle claws. The creature's tail is in the shape of a rainbow leads to the Spirit Worlds. The dots on demon horse and rider represent hail. Heyókȟa was the spirit of opposites and thus represented both cold and heat. Next to the picture, Čhetáŋ Sápa' has written: "The dream of, or the vision of myself when I had been transformed into a destroyer riding a buffalo eagle."

 

 

Like other mystery cults, the religion of the prairie people was multifaceted and difficult to understand, especially for someone who has not experienced any visions. Their conceptions of “God” had a pantheistic streak, at the same time as they had something questioning about them, apparent in the following explanation of his faith the Osage Indian Playful Calf gave Francis La Flesche. La Flesche (1857-1932), whose grandfather was French, hence the name, became America's first Native American university graduate in Ethnography.

 

 

My son ... the ancients, No-ho-zhi-ga, gave us in their songs wi-ge-i, ceremonies, symbols and all that surrounding mysteries had taught them. About this they had gained knowledge through the power that exists in wa-thi-ghto, the ability to seek with the soul. They taught us about the mysteries of light,, which during the day flow down over the earth and feed all that lives; about the mysteries of the night, which open to us visions of the celestial bodies of the upper world, how they travel, each on his own path, without touching each other. They searched, for a long time, for the source of all life and finally came up with the idea that everything flows from an invisible force, which they named Wa-kon-tah.

 

Wa-kon-tah, which in Osage was the name of the almighty creative power, can possibly be roughly equated with the Cheyenne notions of Ma´heo´o. Osage, like the Cheyenne were Prairie Indians and, like them they were devoted to the Sundance. The Sun is not synonymous with Ma´heo´o, but has created the earth on its behalf.

 

 

 

A legend from Siksika, Blackfeet, tells about the origin of the first Sundance. A young man named Payoo, Scarface, was deeply in love with a beautiful aakíí wa, woman, though her father explained to him that his daughter had told him that she did not belong to her father but to Ki´sómma, The Sun. To be able to marry, Payoo had to undergo a trial to determine if he was really worthy of marrying the aakíí wa. After great hardship, Payoo arrived at Ki´sómma 's abode. Ki´sómma paid tribute to Payoo's coveted bride who had proved to be endowed with such great wisdom that she, contrary to most earthlings, had realised that she belonged to and was sustained by Ki´sómma, ruler of Heaven and Earth. Ki´sómma now declared that through his suffering and sacrifices done in the name of love Payoo had finally proved himself worthy of his confidence and allowed him to marry the aakíí wa.

 

Ki´sómma took Payoo by the hand and brought him to the edge of the sky and from there she showed him the entire world while he told everything that was important to understand. Among other things, Ki´sómma explained:

 

Which of all the animals is most Nat-ó-ye (having sun power, sacred)? The buffalo is. Of all animals, I like him best. He is for the people. He is your food and your shelter. [...]Which is the best, the heart or the brain? The brain is. The heart often lies, the brain never.

 

Ki´sómma then demanded that Payoo together with the woman he now gave him, would build the first Sundance arena. It would be like Heaven and Earth. Ki´sómma also explained why people must dance in his honor:

 

I am the only chief. Everything is mine. I made the earth, the mountains, prairies, rivers, and forests. I made the people, an all the animals. This is why I say I alone am the chief. I can never die. True, the winter makes me old and weak, but every summer I grow young again, and you can support m in this. […] Half of it shall be painted red. That is me. The other half you will paint black. That is the night.

 

 

Most of the Cheyenne's various clan and tribal leaders were visionary mystics who, through the charisma they acquired through dreams and visions, were revered as Medicine Men. The word medicine has caused confusion among the uninitiated. It is an overall translation of a variety of words for a concept that seems to be shared by the members of different tribal communities, with widely differing languages. Perhaps the concept of medicine might to some extent be explained by stating that it is the presence of a spiritual force manifested in a person, in a place or through an event, in an object, or as a natural phenomenon. The word has become a unifying concept of spirituality, power, energy and virtually all that is inexplicable, but nevertheless provide insights to the mystery of life. A medicine, yes… even a medicine man, encloses and retains such power. 

 

 

Medicine may come as a gift from other spheres, but must generally be looked for and earned. A way to gain insight into whether you are worthy of receiving a medicine, or not, may be done through participation in the Sundance. In general, such a ceremony takes the form of a common ritual, but it may also happen that an individual seeks certainty about his calling by publicly undergoing a painful Sun Dance ritual. The aforementioned George Catlin described how he watched a trial called Look-into-the-Sun.

 

A man wearing only a loincloth had in the flesh between each nipple and clavicle inserted finger-thick, pointed pieces of wood to which bison hide ropes were attached and connected to the tip of a long, strong, but flexible, pole firmly anchored in the ground. The man then leaned back to thigten the ropes were and the long pole bent towards him. In a tight grip he was in one hand holding his medicine bag and in the other, sacred arrows. He began, with his gaze fixed at the sun, to move around the tensely bent pole. Very slowly he followed, from dawn to dusk, with one step at a time, to the monotonously rhythmic beats of a drum, the sun's journey across the firmament.

 

 

His friends stood around him, singing hymns praising his strength, virtues and endurance, while enemies and skeptics laughed and mocked him. If he succeeded in passing the test without fainting or falling over, it meant that he had good medicine and deserved the trust of his tribal brethren. If, on the other hand, he did not succeed in enduring his torments, he was given not afforded another chance and was subsequently regarded as a “weak man who believed more of himself than he actually could substantiate.”

 

Like the People of Israel, who had their tablets and holy ark, the Cheyenne had a sacred object as well. A medicine containing the power of their creator god – the Maahotse, a bundle with the holy arrows. It enclosed four arrows; two for war luck, two for successful buffalo hunting. They had been bestowed by Ma´heo´o, perhaps sometime in the early eighteenth century, to the medicine man Motsé'eóeve. Ma´heo´o was the source of cosmic energy, Ex´Ahest´Otse, symbolized by the four arrows, which also corresponded to Ex´Ahest´Otse's four spirit stewards. These mighty spirits ruled over the four directions (North, South, East and West), the moon, the animals, the birds, and the fish. The Sun, who gave life to everything was Ex´Ahest´Otse's main manifestation in this world – there are seven other Spheres besides the earth. Through fasting, prayer, sacrifice, and participation in the sacred ceremonies, you can partake in the power of Ex´Ahest´Otse.

 

 

Ex´Ahest´Otses' force is not constant, like nature it changes and is at its weakest in winter time, accordingly it must be strengthened with the help of the Sun at the time of year when it is at its most powerful. Then Maahotse also must be imbued with renewed strength and this is provided by the members of the Cheyennes four most important warrior leagues, generally in connection with the Sundance.

 

The one believed to have been chosen by Ma´heo´o to teach the Cheyenne about all this was Motsé'eóeve, whose name derived from motsé'eonȯtse, sweet grass, a plant used in most religious rites of the Prairie Indians and which also was rubbed onto their skin, as some kind of deodorant. Several who met them have told about the distinct scent of Prairie Indians.

 

As bestower of the sacred arrows, Motsé'eóeve becam able to predict the taming of horses, as well as the arrival of the white men and their cows. He organized the four warrior leagues of the Cheyenne, established their laws, and instituted the governing and legislative assembly of the four véhooós, leaders of each one of the ten manahos, the clans, who during the celebration of the jointly celebrated Sundance appointed four Elders to be chiefs of the whole Cheyenne nation.

 

 

The Sundance was prepared during months, its foundation and ideology were consistent but its character differed in the details depending on the Elder who arranged it, but once he had determined each detail nothing could be changed. The Sundance gathered all members of the tribe, but the time and reason could vary. However, the Sun Dance was generally an annual ceremony that took place:

 

When the buffaloes are at their fattest.

When the buds of the sage appear

and the hawthorn's berries ripen.

When the moon rises and the sun sets.

 

The ceremonies lasted for four days. It was a time to gather and regain lost strength, but also to demonstrate courage and personal sacrifice. Intentions that were reflected in one of the prayers that the keeper of the Maahotse led the people in at the beginning of the Sundance:

 

Great Force of the Sun! I pray for my people that they may be happy in the summer and that they may live through the cold of winter. Many are sick and in need. Have pity on them, let them survive. Grant that they may live long and in abundance! May we perform these ceremonies properly, as you taught our ancestors in days gone by. If we make a mistake, have mercy on us. […] Bless our children, friends and visitors with a happy life. May our paths be straight and even. Let us all live and grow old. We are all your children and ask for this with good hearts.

 

 

After the prayers, the men went to the teepe where the Maahotse rested and gave it their reverence. Women were not allowed to enter, but remained outside singing the sacred hymns. The men who have chosen to “see the sun” were then for some time back residing within the Noceom, The Solitary Teepe, where they were instructed by a Medicine Man. During the four days of dancing, partying and ceremonies included the Sundance ritual, the initiands, who were to submit themselves to the Trial, fasted and during the fourth day when it took place, they had to remain silent during the entire, painful procedure.

 

The area had been cleansed of evil forces. To drive them away, riders had galloped back and forth. The tallest and strongest poplar tree, it had to be at least twenty meters high, had been chosen with great care; pruned, erected and painted with the colours of the four directions; black, red, yellow and white. This high centre pole was decorated with coloured ribbons, scalps taken from enemies, skulls and bison hides. At the top, branches and herbs were used to create a nest for the Thunderbird, who guards and protects the upper world, while on the ground the symbol of the Horned Snake, guardian of the underworld, was painted.

 

 

Before the surrounding tent of buffalo hides was erected around the dance floor, a doll was hung from the center pole, probably symbolizing strife and evil forces. Warriors rode forward to give the puppet hard blows with their coupe sticks, after that they shot arrows at it, or shelled it with rifle fire.

 

 

Then followed a mock battle between the different warrior leagues and after a symbolic peace was broken, the canvas was finally risen, though by the Thunderbird´s nest a wide opening was left so the Sun's rays could reach the entire dance floor.  Hest´Osanest´Oste , The Arena of New Life, was completed and prepared for the fourth day when the initiands were going to Watch-The-Sun.

 

There is plenty of conflicting information about what tales place during the last day of a Sundance and those who have participated in such a ritual are generally reluctant to tell an outsider about what happened. It is the Prairie Indians most sacred ceremony and many of them fear that outsiders may defile its solemn status, destroy its mystery. According to their belief, it would be fatal if a Sundance was not carried out in accordance with´its smallest, previously determined detail. The slightest mistake, or violation of tradition, would upset the balance that Ma´heo´o maintains.

 

What happens cannot be described or written down by someone who has not watched the sun himself and even those who have done so are either unable to describe their experience, or reluctant to do so. However, some great medicine men, like Sitting Bull, have eloquently communicated some of the visions they received during a Sundance. Furthermore, US authorities did everything in their power to wipe out the Sundance and thus also tried to destroy the Cheyenne as a community, a people. The Sundance was in 1883 by completely banned and it was not until 1978, through the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, that it was no longer a criminal offense to organize or participate in a Sundance.

 

We thus generally lack descriptions of what happens during a Sundance, though there are some exceptions. The aforementioned George Catlin, who after painting a portrait of an Elder in charge of a Sundance, made him declare that Catlin through his masterful rendering of him had proved that he was in possession of powerful medicine and thus gave the artist permission to witness a Sundance. Catlin wrote meticulously down what he had seen and furthermore published his description, which unfortunately became a contributing factor for banning the Sundance forty years later.

 

 

Nevertheless, the tradition did not disappear. Sundances continued to be practiced more or less in secret. For example, during the 1960s and 1970s several Sundances were attended by the Jesuit priest Paul Steinmetz, who in 1980 defended his doctoral dissertation concerning the Oglala-Lakota Sioux religion and Medicin Men´s cooperation with the Catholic Church. Steinmetz mentioned in his dissertation, presented at Stockholm University, that it had happened that “white men” asked to Watch-The-Sun during Sundances but their requests had been rejected with the argument: “You have destroyed your own religion and we do not want you to do the same with ours as well.”

 

Catlin and Steinmetz described at an intervals of more than a hundred years how those who are to be initiated into the innermost mystery of the Sundance are prepared for their trial. They are painted all over the body with yellow or white clay, provided with a crown of herbs and/or eagle feathers, given a bouquet of sage in one hand and in the other they carry their personal Medicine Pouch. They are then introduced into the Hest´Osanest´Oste among the men who previously have participated in the Sundance.

 

 

After their long fast the young men are noticeably distraught. They are accompanied by red-painted Medicine Men, whose soles and palms are red as well, while the wounds that indicate that their bearers previously have endured the Sundance are covered with white clay. The Medicine Men have sharp-edged knives in their hands and generally wear masks so the initiates will not be able to see who is inflicting the wounds upon them. With their knives, the Medicine Men cut parallel wounds in the skin and flesh of the breasts and backs of the initiands, widening them carefully to insert pointed sticks. The pain must be almost unbearable.

 

Catlin wrote that he was surprised that the incised men did not bleed more profusely – perhaps their fasting had driven the blood deep into their bodies? A young man who discovered that Catlin was recording everything he saw asked the Medicine Men to be placed on a mat in front of the white man. The initiand gently touched the artist's shoulder and signed that Catlin ought to look deep into his eyes while the Medicine Men made their cuts. Catlin obeyed and discovered that the smiling man did not show the slightest sign of pain during the extremely agonizing procedure.

 

 

While the cuts were being made, straps were lowered down from crossbars, or from the top of the centre pole, and then attached to the pointed sticks inserted in the initiands´ flesh. Then the Sun-watchers were hoisted up until their feet hovered freely a few meters above the ground. The skin of their chests tightened and became painfully stretched. Heavy buffalo skulls were attached on straps hanging from the backs or thighs, their weight hindered the hanging men from wriggling and twisting in pain.

 

As the initiands were hoisted up, the men who sat, or stood, around them sang soothing songs. The hanging men demonstrated no signs of pain, though tears flowed down their cheeks as they stiffly looked up at the sun disk that shone down in Hest´Osanest´Oste from the wide opening by Thunderbird´s nest. They hung seemingly lifeless and gradually fainted, one by one. It was at that moment visions came to them.

 

As I read this, I came to think of how the Viking god Odin sought wisdom by hanging from a tree, “sacrificing himself to himself”

 

I know that I hung, on wind-rocked tree,

nine whole nights,

with a spear wounded. And to Odin offered,

myself to myself.

 

Bread no one gave me,

nor a horn to drink from.

Downward I peered,

to runes applied myself,

wailing I learned them,

then I fell down.

 

[…]

 

Then I began to prosper,

and know many things,

to grow and well thrive:

Word by word I sought out words,

fact by fact I sought out facts.

 

 

After a while the Sundancers' heads hung downwards. When someone ended up in this state, the congregation shouted: “Death! Death!" and after a short while the lifeless man was lowered. The hanging lasted between fifteen and twenty minutes and during that time high-ranking dignitaries watched intently the dangling men very, to determine who had shown the greatest courage and composure. Who had endured the pain the longest, without complaining or fainting. Such observations indicated who could conceivably lead a war raid, or eventually occupy high positions within the Cheyenne administration.

 

 

Showing strength, reckless courage, and enduring pain were desirable qualities for any Cheyenne warrior. Anyone who aspired to be part of one of the prestigious Nótȧxévėstotȯtse, warrior leagues – The Deer, The Shield, The Fox, or The Bowstring – must have endured the Sundance Trial. Within these associations, they could furthermore increase their prestige by “counting coups”, from the French word for blow/coup. A coup that had been witnessed by other warriors meant that the achiever of such a feat could attach a feather to his war bonnet, where each feather indicated various kinds of coups – for example if the wearer of the bonnet had killed an enemy, been wounded in battle, taken a scalp, or carried out the boldest coup of them all – approached an armed enemy and struck him with a coup stick and after that returned unharmed to his comrades-in-arms. 

 

 

Below is a coup stick, a ledger drawing depicting a Cheyenne warrior giving a coup to a rifle-armed Crow warrior and a photograph of a war-ready Nótȧxévėstotȯts warrior with his long coup stick.

 

 

Members of the Bowstring Fraternity often used a bow, instead of a coup stick. Below is one of Bowstrings's warriors, perhaps the highly admired Woo-ka-nay, by the whites called The Roman Nose, performing an unusually bold coup by throwing bows at two mounted Blue Coats, i.e. U.S. Army cavalry soldiers. We also see how Howling Wolf has jumped off his horse and rushed forward to give a coup to a bow-armed Pawne warrior.

 

 

When they went into battle against their opponents, Cheyenne warriors carried with them the sacred arrow bundle Maahotse and until 1830 it had given them strength and victory. That year Wakingan Ska, White Thunder, rode into battle against the Pawnes. By Wakingan Ska's side, his wife rode with the Maahotse tied to her back. During their ride to the battlefield, they were surprised by four Pawne warriors and Wakingan Ska fell from his horse. However, he managed to rush up to his wife tear at Maahotse from her back and threw over it over to the war shaman Bull, who immediately tied it to his spear. The Pawne warriors understood that the Cheyenne had not had any time to utter the Words of Power necessary for activating Maahostse's force before a battle. A mortally wounded Pawne now saw his chance to gain access to The Happy Hunting Grounds through a heroic coup. He rushed forward toward Bull who thrust his spear into him, but before the Pawne warrior died he had managed to tear Maahotse off Bull's spear and throw it to his fellow fighters. In this manner, the Cheyenne lost Ma´heo´o's protection and their misfortunes piled up. 

 

 

At a meeting in 1835, the Cheyenne managed to buy back one arrow from the Maahotse bundle, it cost them a hundred horses and in 1843 they did for the for the same price buy the entire bundle from Lakota warriors who as a war trophy had conquered it from the Pawnes, but two arrows were missing.

 

It seems that luck was with them before the Cheyenne lost their Maahostse. Admittedly, they continued their merciless fighting with neighbouring trivs, especially the Pawne, Crow, Kiowa, and Comanche peoples. However, they made alliances with the Sioux, the southern Apaches, and especially the Arapaho, who became their brothers-in-Arms. Below, Howling Wolf describes how the leaders of the two peoples enter into their ever-lasting agreement.

 

 

The battles with Crow and Kiowa were also successful. Here you can see how Woo-ka-nay and his warriors return with scalp spears after a battle with Kiowas.

 

 

But ... after the Maahotse was lost, signs of misfortune became more and more common. No less than 48 bowstring warriors were killed in 1836 during an ambush arranged by Kiowa warriors. The revenge was gruesome when the Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors attacked a Kiowa camp in 1838, though the battle became so bloody that all parties were terrified and made peace in 1840. A raid to steal cattle in Mexico, which in 1853 was carried out together with the former enemies of Kiowa, Cheyenne and Apache warriors ended in disaster when a large number of them were killed by units from the Mexican army – the feared Lancers.

 

 

However, a far worse catastrophe was approaching. The American Civil War, fought between 1861 and 1865, led to the liberation of four million slaves and the eventual unification of the United States into a successful nation, but it also spelled disaster for the Indians. A ruthless, racist onslaught by the United States Government almost caused their final annihilation.

 

Due to the need for fast troop transport during the war, the railway network in the Northern States developed at an unprecedented speed and with great efficiency. To link the western regions more closely to the war effort and facilitate access to natural resources further west, the The Government of the United States (the Union) began in 1862 to build a transcontinental railway line that would link the east coast to the west coast and along its path lead to the construction of cities that would develop surrounding areas.

 

 

An initiative linked to the so-called Homestead Act, which in May 1862 stipulated that every American citizen who had reached “mature age”, and/or was a “breadwinner,” and for five years undertook to cultivate, or otherwise productively utilize, an area of ​​no more than 160 acres (65 hectares), would then become its rightful owner. This initiative gradually led to an increase in immigration from Europe's poor agricultural areas. After the Civil War, agricultural production increased at great speed favouring a rapid development of food-, weapons - and textile industries.

 

 

Long before the war, US governments had seen the Indians as a major obstacle to such a development. A thought made clear by Donald J. Trump's great idol Andrew Jackson in his inaugural address delivered in 1830:

 

Humanity has often wept over the fate of the aborignees of this country and Philantopy has long been busily employed in devising means to avert it, but its progress has never for a minute been arrested, and one by one have many powerful tribes disappeared from earth. To follow to the tomb the last of his race and to tread the graves of extinct nations exite melancholy reflections. But true philantropy reconciles the mind to these vicissitudes as it does to the extinction of one generation to make room for another. What good man would prefer a country covered by wild forests and ranged by a few thousands savages to our extensive Republic, studded with cities, towns and prosperous farms.

 

According to Pesident Jackson, the Indians had to disappear from fertile agricultural lands and under his leadership the so-called Indian Removal Act was enacted, which made it possible to forcibly deport indigenous peoples from the lands of their ancestors. Under Jackson's leadership, more than 45,000 Indians were forcibly expelled from their land. A ruthless policy that continued under his successor Martin van Buren, whose first action as president was to realise Jackson's planned “relocation” of the Cherokees, an endeavour killing more than 4,000 men, women and children during the so-called Trail of Tears, when an entire population was forced to settle on much more barren lands in buffalo-poor areas. Below is Donald J. Trump portrayed in front of a copy in of Andrew Jackson's equestrian statue, now located in front of the White House. Trump is apparently contemplating to adorn the White House with this painting now when his presidency, thank God, is ended. Apart from the indigenous people of the United States, who for good reason regard him with disgust, Jackson is also not particularly popular among the black population of the United States. He was a plantation owner, with a large number of slaves working on his estate, 150 of whom ran his whiskey brewery, of course unpaid and subjected to arbitrary violence.

 

 

The Civil War´s victorious General Ulysses S. Grant became president in 1869 after Andrew Johnson, who took over the presidency after the assassination of Lincoln in 1865 and had mismanaged his mandate leading to his impeachment. Grant was not any anti-Native American, but inherited a policy that imprisoned indigenous peoples in reservations, where they became dependent on capricious arriving food transports, something that as we have seen above had devastating effects in Minnesota in 1862.

 

As a self-confessed, deeply Christian person, Grant declared at the time of taking power that he could not accept a view that declared God as the creator of a race that just because it considered itself stronger than others gave itself the right to destroy those it considered weaker. Grant had been in contact with Indians in California and Oregon, and declared that they had fallen victims to lies about supplies and rights promised them by government officials during the signing of a variety of treaties. In addition, they had been decimated by smallpox and measles brought to the continent by white settlers.

 

 

Ulysses Grant appointed his friend the Native American lawyer Eloy S. Parker, whose original name was Ha-sa-no-an-da, as High Commissioner for Indian Affairs and devised with him a policy aimed at making members of the Native Americans equal to American citizens. Unfortunately, the Board of Directors of The Bureau of Indian Affairs was largely composed of wealthy entrepreneurs who were rabid opponents to its chairman. One outspoken racist member in particular, William Welsh, led a campaign against Ely Parker, whom he considered to be an arrogant savage who had been audacious enough to become a close friend with and confidant of the president of the United States, marry a white woman and was now allowed to exercise his biased influence over affairs. concerning his “racial relatives”. Welsh made sure that Parker was accused of embezzling state funds, and although a congressional committee acquitted him of all suspicions, the scandal was a fact. Parker resigned and Grant's Indian policy suffered major setbacks, especially after an Indian leader, chief Kintepuasch who together with his small tribe, the Medoc, had been expelled from his territory and after “illegally” returning was forced to negotiate with members of the US Army, in despair had shot down the chief negotiator General Edward Canby.

 

 

The rage of Grant's opponents knew no bounds. After fierce fighting, Kintepuasch was captured and executed. It got even worse after Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer's defeat at Little Bighorn, which Grant blamed on “rave tactical errors during a regular war.” Grant's presidency faltered in the face of public outrage against his “failed” indians policies, further fueled by irritation over corruption and abuse of power that had become endemic during jispresidency, although Grant apparently did everything he could to curb it. The President had to crawl to the cross and leave the “solution to the Indian question” to his comrade-in-arms, General William Sherman, and his subordinate, the notorious Native American hater General Philip Sheridan, also a hero of the Civil War´s Union side.

 

If Grant actually was sympathetic to the Native Americans, it seems strange that he appointed Sherman as military in charge for all territory west of the Mississippi River and thus main responsible for the protection of railroad construction to the west and the settler caravans that brought peasants who benefited of the Homestead Act. Sherman's mission would undoubtedly lead to confrontations with the Prairie Indians, many of whom opposed the construction of the railway, well aware that it was another step towards the annihilation of their way of life.

 

Even before Grant became president, Sherman had written to him that he considered that a precondition for railway construction would be not to let any “thieving, ragged Indians check and stop the progress of the railroads.” When guerrilla warrior Crazy Horse as leader of a band of 10 Sioux, Arapaho, and Cheyenne warriors in 1866 tricked 81 American soldiers into an ambush and killed to the last man, a furious Sherman wrote to Grant advising him that as soon as he became president “we must act with vindictive earnestness against the Sioux, even to their extermination, men, women and children.” It can not possibly be interpreted as an Indian-friendly act to appoint such a man as commander of the US Western military forces.

 

 

When Grant finally gave up his plans to grant American citizenship to the indigenous people, he reluctantly announced that the “reservation solution” probably was the only possible step that eventually could lead to the “pacification of the Indians”. He declared that he only wished that :

 

They are being cared for in such a way, it is hoped, as to induce those still pursuing their old habits of life to embrace the only opportunity which is left them to avoid extermination.

 

An unfortunate development of Grant's retreat was that his “peace policy” allowed for the extermination of the bison as a method of forcing the Prairie Indians to become farmers. Furthermore, if you got rid of the huge buffalo herds, they would not hinder the progress of the trains and destroy the farmers' crops.

 

 

General Sherman's disastrous choice for handling the “pacification of the Indians” was General Philip Henry Sheridan. He was only 165 cm tall, but compensated for his insignificant height with a hard attitude and a flagrant aptitude for flattery. During the Civil War, Sheridan became a hero through his bold operations, for example, a wildly popular poem making a unabashed tribute to him was spread across the Northern States – Sheridan's ride by a certain Thomas Buchanan Read:

 

Hurrah! hurrah for Sheridan!
Hurrah! hurrah for horse and man!
And when their statues are placed on high,
Under the dome of the Union sky,
The American soldier's Temple of Fame;
There with the glorious general's name,
Be it said, in letters both bold and bright,
"Here is the steed that saved the day,
By carrying Sheridan into the fight,
From Winchester, twenty miles away!"

 

 

During the Civil War, Sheridan was the Union commander who most successfully carried out the “scorched-earth policy” that between the 15th and 21th December was first practiced by General William Sherman during his so called March to the Sea in Georgia. The intention was to destroy the enemy troops' ability to use the natural resources they needed for their maintenance. A technique Sheridan then used in his fight against the Indians. For him, it mainly meant the extinction of the buffaloes, the firm base for the livelihood and culture of the Prairie Indians.

 

The companies that built and maintained the railway – Western Pacific, Cnetral Pacific and Union Pacific, declared war on the buffaloes. Hunters like Buffalo Bill were hired to deliver bison meat to the navvies and also kill as many buffalos as they could. When the railway was completed in 1869, the outright slaughter intensified even more. Thousands of hunters arrived in the West to engage in recreational hunting. There were even special buffalo trains from which hunters from windows and roofs shot countless of 700 kilos´ bulls, which carcasses were left to rot on the prairie. Unlike the Indians who killed bison for food, clothing and shelter, these amusement hunters killed the animals for their own pleasure.

 

 

No wonder the trains were frequently attacked, nor can it be denied that the growing numbers of settlers by many Native American warriors were considered to be a threat and wagon trains and settlements were attacked. Settler families were killed, but significantly more Native American families were massacred by the U.S. military, which superiority and effectiveness were a hundred times greater than the Native American warrior units.

 

 

When Texas lawmakers in the Senate introduced a bill to stop a total extinction of buffaloes, the proposal was opposed by General Sheridan, who stated that if the bison disappeared the Native American problem would be solved. He took the opportunity to pay tribute to the buffalo hunters' efforts:

 

These men have done more in the last two years, and will do more in the next year, to settle the vexed Indian question, than the entire regular army has done in the last forty years. They are destroying the Indians’ commissary. And it is a well known fact that an army losing its base of supplies is placed at a great disadvantage. Send them powder and lead, if you will; but for a lasting peace, let them kill, skin and sell until the buffaloes are exterminated. Then your prairies can be covered with speckled cattle.

 

 

When the Native Amerikan chieftain Tosawi in 1869 before Sheridan lamented the fate of his people and declared: “I Tosawi. I am a good Indian,” Sheridan replied: “The only good Indian is a dead Indian.”

 

By the end of the 1880s, only 300 bison lived in their natural state. Congress decided that the only surviving flock of buffalo would be protected at all costs. It was located in the Yellowstone National Park, which had been established in 1872 and among its initiators counted no less than General Sheridan. Five years later, in his Annual Report to the Congress, Sheridan pointed out the role of the railroad in the war against the Indians and furthermore squeezed out a couple of crocodile tears over the sad fate of Native Americans:

 

We took away their country and their means of support, broke up their mode of living, their habits of life, introduced disease and decay among them, and it was for this and against this that they made war. Could anyone expect less?

 

Over time, Sheridan had become thoroughly hated by his classmate from The US Military Academy at West Point, General George Crook, who here sits to Sheridan´s left during their time at the Academy.

 

Unlike Sheridan, Crook was not an Indian hater, though in his dealings with indigenous people he constantly commuted between negotiation and battle, between compassion and attack. Part of Crook's tactics was to exploit the Indians' internal strife and make use of the different tribes´ knowledge of their foes. His friendship with several Native Americans and h“excessive” use of indigenous scouts and mercenaries angered his closest superior – General Sheridan, thois ugh the practice also angered Native American warriors who generally dealt merciless with “brethren” who had chosen to fight them together with the white man. Cheyenne warriors found it difficult to come to terms with the Pawnes who battled them alongside the US Cavalry side and killed them merciless if they crossed their war paths.

 

 

Despite General Sheridan's harsh criticism of his subordinate, Crook in 1888 eventually became Military Commander west of the Mississippi. Crook was by then disillusioned and to a great extent regretted his contributions to what he considered to have been an entirely misguided policy by the US Government and finally became a spokesman for Native Americans equal rights as American citizens.

 

Unlike Crook, Sheridan has remained one of the Nation's Heroes. If he knew who Sheridan was, which is not entirely certain, I am convinced that Donald J. Trump would include him among the American Greats he hailed in his speech on the last US Independence Day and whose memory, according to him, must be revered and not defiled:

 

We are the country of Andrew Jackson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Frederick Douglass.  We are the land of Wild Bill Hickock and Buffalo Bill Cody [...] and yet, as we meet here tonight, there is a growing danger that threatens every blessing our ancestors fought so hard for, struggled, they bled to secure. Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children.

 

The “campaign” referred to by Trump is an attempt to nuance a self-glorifying patriotism that denies shadows cast by genocide, slavery and racism. I am writing this on the seventh of November 2020, the day when we could finally glimpse some light at the end of a dark tunnel of presidential idiocy, contempt for women and chauvinism.

 

The ruthless exterminator of US indigenous peoples, General Philip Henry Sheridan, has been portrayed on stamps and his impressive equestrian statue adorns central squares in major cities such as Chicago and Albany.

 

 

Back to Ho-na-nist-to, Howling Wolf, and the ledger drawings:

 

The attack came just before dawn. Sound is carried far and wide over the treeless and often deserted prairie. Even before the riders became visible by the horizon, several of the camp's residents had gathered around Mo'ôhtavetoo'o and lloked with him anxiously across the grassy plain, where thin mist gilded by the rising sun still lingered. A distant bugle sounded and soon a battle line with fast galloping Blue Coats became visible. In full career they burst forward towards the slightly more than hundred tepees pitched along Sand Creek's almost dried up brook. Chief Mo'ôhtavetoo'o, the Black Cauldron, had hoisted the Stars and Stripes next to his tepee, which was placed right on the edge of the camp, and he now asked his tribesmen to wave white pieces of cloth to indicate that they were not hostile. Nevertheless, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o understood that it was pointless and was deeply concerned. Most of the tribe's warriors were out hunting a few bison, which the day before that had been sighted a few kilometers beyond the camp.

 

 

Some weeks earlier, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o had met with officers at a military camp just outside Denver, and been assured that his starving people did not have to worry as long as they camped at the place they had been assigned. This was not true. Those who should have protected them were now about to attack them. The fast approaching blue-clad riders were already opening fire from the horse backs. With outstretched hands, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o approached the oncoming cavalry, though their leader fired his revolver straight at the unarmed chief.

 

 

As hell broke out around them, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o and his wife Ar-no-ho-wok fled between wildly shooting soldiers and terrified women and children. Only when he had thrown himself into a ditch just outside the camp did Mo'ôhtavetoo'o discover that Ar-no-ho-wok was no longer with him.

 

 

He rushed back, into the camp, where soldiers mad with blood lust rushed into the tepees, women were raped, men were scalped, not even children were spared from their uninhibited, drunken wrath. Mo'ôhtavetoo'o found his wife bleeding on the ground, shot no less than nine times. In the midst of the tumult, he managed to carry Ar-no-ho-wok to safety and she survived as if by a miracle.

 

The massacre at Sand Creek was the culmination of a period of violent tension between the Cheyenne and settler communities in Colorado, which would not be recognized as a state until twelve years later. The citizens of Denver were gripped by fear, anxiety and hatred after a white family had been killed just outside town. The crime was attributed to looting Cheyenne or Arapaho warriors. The territorial governor, John Evans, had called on Denver's men to organize a militia to “kill and annihilate hostile natives” while ensuring that the 3rd Colorado Cavalry was relocated to the city.

 

 

This Cavalry Unit was under the command of the ruthless former preacher John Chivington, who due to his efforts during the not-yet-concluded Civil War recently had been promoted to colonel. Chivington was a giant; almost two meters tall, weighed more than 100 kilos and was filled with confidence after his successes while battling the Confederate troops. He was now hoping to win new laurels by fighting the Indians and aimed at being elected to Congress.

 

Evans had ordered all “friendly Indians” to seek “security” from the hostile militia in places controlled by the US military. Sand Creek was such a place, and Mo'ôhtavetoo'o had been promised that if he could keep his people calm, the starving Indians would be provided with food supplies and be protected by the US Army from possible attacks. Too late Mo'ôhtavetoo'o realized that it was a big mistake to trust the Whites. Governor Evans' intention had, in fact been to gather the Cheyenne in a strategically convenient location so that Chivington's cavalry could attack them without difficulty and “teach them a lesson.” When Chivington, through his Pawne scouts had learned that most of the Cheyenne warriors from Sand Creek were away on a buffalo hunt and the large camp lay virtually unprotected, he immediately led about 800 men on a night trek toward the Indian camp.

 

 

In the midst of the bloody pandemonium the Cheyenne warriors returned from their buffalo hunt and rode in full career against the soldiers, who quickly went in shooting position by the edges of the camp. The attacking Cheyennes were temporarily halted by Pawne warriors who allied with the Blue Coats circled the camp to warn the murderous posse if the hunters would return. During a brief skirmish during one of the Cheyenne warriors killed a Pawne, who had fallen from his horse and were running towards the camp.

 

 

While Cheyenne warriors chased the Pawne “traitors” toward the camp the US soldiers were ready to confront them. They had more or less finished their looting and murder spree and from behind teepes facing the steppe they opened a lethal fire at the attacking Cheyenne warriors, led by a young Howling Wolf. As soon as the mounted warriors had come within firing range several of them were mowed down by the cavalry's Springfield rifles and a Parrott Rifle Cannon.

 

Dead and wounded Cheyennes were thrown off the horse backs, but some reached the soldiers´ firing line and managed to kill and wound several of them. But the superiority was far too big and the warriors had to retreat, among them Ho-na-nist-to, Howling Wolf. The bitter Bowstring warriors later joined forces with their warlord Woo-ka-nay and united with Arapaho and Lakota warriors they attacked trains, settlements and wagon caravans, in an increasingly hopeless battle against the encroaching Pale Faces.

 

 

Charington and his cavalry burned down the large tepee village and returned in triumph to Denver, where, in front of jubilant townspeople, they displayed war trophies in the form of scalps and other body parts they had cut from their victims. That same evening, Chivington submitted a written statement to Governor Evans:

 

At daylight this morning attacked Cheyenne village of 130 lodges, from 900 to 1,000 warriors strong. My men waged a furious battle against well-armed and entrenched foes, ending in a great victory: the deaths of several chiefs, between 400 and 500 other Indians, and almost an annihilation of the entire tribe.

 

 

Captain Silas Soules had been involved in the negotiations between Governor Evans, Chivington and Mo'ôhtavetoo'o and witnessed how authorities and the military guaranteed the security of the his camp. Soules had also taken part in the nightly march toward Sand Creek. However, when Chivington ordered an attack, Captain Soules and a couple of other cavalrymen restrained their horses and from a distance were with disgust forced to witness a chaotic massacre, without any possibility of intervening and hinder the crazed blood bath. On the same day as Chivington submitted his report, Soules wrote a letter to a good friend, a major, who made it reach a congressman:

 

Hundreds of women and children were coming towards us, and getting on their knees for mercy, only to be shot and have their brains beat out by men professing to be civilized. The Indians did not fight from trenches; they fled up the creek and desperately dug into its sand banks for protection. From there, some young men defended themselves as well as they could, with a few rifles and bows, until overwhelmed by carbines and howitzers. Others were chased down and killed as they fled across the plains. An estimated 200 Indians died, all but 60 of them women and children. Our soldiers not only scalped the dead but cut off the ears and privates of chiefs. Squaws snatches were cut out for trophies. There was no organization among our troops, they were a perfect mob — every man on his own hook. Given this chaos, some of the dozen or so soldiers killed were likely hit by friendly fire.

 

 

The Congress appointed an investigative commission, which confirmed the information provided by Captain Soules and concluded that Chivington had “deliberately planned and executed a foul and dastardly massacre and surprised and murdered, in cold blood Indians who had every reason to believe that they were under [U.S.] protection.”

 

Since Chivington had already left the army, he could not be court-martialed and no local court dealt with the case. No one was convicted of involvement in the massacre, though Silas Soules, who during the ongoing process had married and served as provost marshal in Denver, was shot dead two months after his testimony before a military court in Washington. No one pointed out the well-known killers and the murder was not prosecuted.

 

 

The 1970 film Soldier Blue, which at the time was perceived as a protest against the Vietnam War, was inspired by the Sand Creek massacre. I saw the it one summer when I was sixteen years old and working as a waiter in a Swedish coastal town, I became quite touched by it and bought the single with the main theme written and sung by the Canadian Cree Indian Buffy Sainte-Marie.

 

Ooh, soldier blue, soldier blue.

can not you see that there's another way to love her.

This is my country.

I ran from here

and I'm learning how to count upon her.

Tall trees and the corn is high country.

Yes, I love her

and I'm learning how to take care of her.

 

 

With his severely wounded wife and the sorry remains of his humiliated, injured, and starving tribe, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o headed east to a reservation by the Washita River in Oklahoma. Despite betrayals and hardships, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o remained a pragmatic man who had accepted the impossibility of defying a disastrous development and fighting the US Army. When he in 1865 once again signed a treaty with the US government, Mo'ôhtavetoo'o declared:

 

Although wrongs have been done me, I live in hopes. I have not got two hearts.... I once thought that I was the only man that persevered to be the friend of the white man, but since they have come and cleaned out our lodges, horses, and everything else, it is hard for me to believe white men any more.

 

 

In 1868, Cheyenne fighters did in Kansas attack settlements, trains and wagon caravan, resulting in 79 “white” casualties. General Sheridan decided it was time to “teach the Cheyenne a lesson, once and for all.” He recalled Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, who a few months earlier had for a year been deprived of his command by a court-martial, due to “unprovoked assault omn rank and file”, and ordered him to “punish” the Cheyenne. Sheridan believed that the most appropriate time for such an endeavor would be during the winter season when the Indians were largely “inactive” within their camps. Custer chose to attack an “Indian village"”within the Washita Reservation that had been “guaranteed protection” by the commander of Fort Cobb.

 

During the night of November 26, Custer's cavalry unit had surrounded an arbitrarily chosen camp. He brought with him the Seventh Cavalry´s brass band, and to the tune of the Irish march Garry Owen (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IMFX6rEp7k&ab), the cavalrymen attacked the unprotected and caught off guard camp, which happened to be under Mo'ôhtavetoo's leadership. The unfortunate chieftain had as usual hoisted both Stars and Stripes and a white flag in front of his teepe. Most Indians, including about twenty women and children, were killed during the first wave of attacks. Some Cheyenne warriors managed to offer resistance, but after a few hours it was all over. Custer announced that 103 Cheyennes had been killed, including Mo'ôhtavetoo'o and his wife Ar-no-ho-wok, who were shot in the back as they on horseback tried to cross the partly ice-covered Washita River. It was neither the first nor the last time that Custer, "the hero of Little Bighorn," attacked an unprotected Native American village and his men in cold blood killed women and children.

 

 

When Custer was criticized for attacking a white-flagged Native American settlemnt within a government-protected reservation, he was defended by General Sheridan, who explained that it could hardly have been considered as an “innocent” village because no less than twenty-one of Custer's cavalrymen had been killed during the “battle”. and by the way: "If a village comes under attack and women and children are killed, it is not actually our soldiers who are to blame for the violence, but those whose crimes necessitated the attack."

 

According to Sheridan the peace-seeking Cheyenne in Washita had to suffer due to ravages by Bowstring Warriors in Kansas, where Woo-ka-nay had formed an alliance with Oglala warriors. Yet another case of guilt by association where an entire people had to suffer for the crimes of a small group. On September 10, 1868, Cheyenne and Sioux warriors had successfully stopped and looted a freight train on the Kansas Pacific Line and were after that pursued by a fifty-man militia recruited by General Sheridan. 

 

 

One week later, the buffalo hunters, wagon train guides and other guns for hire, were surprised by the Indian warriors. Several of them were mowed down by the militia-men's fast-firing Spencer rifles, but a dozen of the commandos were also killed before they after a couple of days were rescued by a cavalry unit. The greatest loss for the Cheyenne was the death of Woo-ka-nay.

 

 

During the winter of 1873-1874, the Southern Prairie Indians' situation became precarious. The catastrophic decline of the buffalo herds, combined with a growing number of new settlers and increasingly aggressive military patrols, had forced most of them into heavily guarded reservation. The situation of the Sioux, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Apache, and Arapaho who were still on the warpath was unsustainable. The American army consisted of professional soldiers and scouts, while the increasingly hard-pressed Native American warriors traveled with women, children, and the elderly.

 

The Bowstring Warriors had not recovered from the loss of Woo-ka-nay, and although they did not give up in the face of superiority, they seldom went on the offensive, but had for seven years been almost constantly on the run from their pursuers. The Washita Massacre initiated General Sheridan's increasingly ruthless war against Native American warriors and the skirmishes culminated during the winter of 1873 through the so-called Red River War. Groups such as the remnants of the Woo-ka-nay´s Bowstring Warriors were circumvented by a large military operation consisting of the Fourth, Sixth and Eleventh Cavalris, which succeeded in driving the “hostile Indian hordes” down to Northen Texas, encircling them and systematically fighting them with the support of the Fourth Infantry and units consisting Native American scouts. After years of fighting and persecution, the starving Indian warriors were completely exhausted. The bison were extinct, trains and caravans had brought with them an ever-increasing stream of settlers and the U.S. Army gave them no respite.

 

 

In the spring of 1874, most of the warriors gave up the fighting, including the Bowstring League, which members with wives and children surrendered at Fort Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma, where members of various tribes already had gathered. Some had volunteered to come, others had been captured.

 

Among the prisoners, 35 Cheyennes, 27 Kiowa, 11 Commanche and one Caddo were selected without trial transported to Saint Augustine in Florida. General Sheridan had that the arbitrarily condemned Indians had acted as a belligerent unit and therefore could not be convicted as individuals. Nor could they be described as prisoners of war because, according to Sheridan, they were Americans and thus could not be counted as “soldiers in the service of a foreign power.” They would therefore be brought to a fortress the East to be kept in custody until their further fate could be determined on the basis of federal jurisdiction.

 

The prisoners were chained for 28 days brought on foot, by ox-carts, trains and steamboats to Fort Marion outside the town of Saint Augustine. During the journey two of the prisoners attempted suicide, one died of pneumonia and another was shot “during attempt to escape”. When the prisoners had arrived at their final destination, the Deputy Director of the facility, Lieutenant Richard Henry Pratt, was horrified by their pitiful state:

 

I had never seen a more pitifully demoralized group than the travel-weary warriors who clutched ragged blankets about them.

 

 

The conditions were miserable at first. The prisoners slept directly on the floor of their cells and during the first weeks two more prisoners died. However, Pratt gradually improved the situation. He obtained army uniforms, beds and bedding, abolished shackles and left the cells open. Furthermore, he got his sueriors´ permission for the prisoners to "carry non-operational rifles", as well as to organize their own guard duty and law enforcement.

 

When the Native American prisoners appeared outside Saint Augustine, the picturesque small town had since a few years back begun to attract wealthy summer visitors. Several of them were curious about Fort Marion's exotic inmates, some of whom had obtained a certain fame through books and newspaper articles. Eventually, Pratt allowed outsiders to visit the fortress. The prisoners had by then then achieved a “certain degree of civilization” after being forced to attend daily lessons for several hours in English, Christianity and general “civilization”, organized by ladies from Saint Augustine's high society.

 

Sermons and guest lectures were also provided by benevolent philanthropists. For example, Henry Whipple from Minnesota often visited and preached in the church on the Anastasia Island, located opposite Fort Marion, where the prisoners were taken every Sunday. This Whipple was the same bishop who had persuaded President Lincoln to pardon some of the Sioux warriors and save them from the mass execution in Mankota. Due to bishop's wife´s weak lungs, the Whipple couple spent their summer months in Saint Augustine. Henry Whipple was now known as the Advocate of the Indians and declared that if they accepted Jesus and a civilized way of life, primitive natives could be “just as decent as any other American citizen.”

 

 

Howling Wolf, a loyal supporter of Woo-ka-nay and survivor from the Sand Creek massacre, who had fought the Whites as long as long as he was able to do it, quickly learned English (he was already fluent in Spanich), enthusiastically attended all the lessons and to gain some income he entertained visitors by dressing up in his traditional costume to dance, instructed them in archery, aw well as he sold drwings and sold signed photographs of himself, like the stereoscope image below.

 

 

During the three years that most of the Indians were imprisoned in Fort Marion, they eventually became popular in San Augustine. They were commonly called “our Florida Boys” and almost all prisoners made an effort to provide and impression of being hard-working, disciplined and benevolent young men who without protest were trying to embrace “American culture”. All of them learned English, and even if they at first had been reluctant to allow themselves to be instructed by women, they soon accepted the benevolent treatment they received from their female teachers. Here, a group of chieftains from different tribes have been photographed together with Captain Pratt and Sarah Mather, good friend of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

 

 

Richard Pratt's well-behaved Indians became a national success, despite General Sherdian's muttering that the endeavour smelled of “Indian twaddle”. Societies for “Native American welfare” were established and several schools founded to educate young Indians to “socially useful citizens”. Several wealthy ladies visited Fort Marion. For example, Alice Key Pendleton, married to the influential Senator George Hunt Pendleton. Alice especially cared for the former Cheyenne warriors O-kuh-ha-tuh, Caryl Zotom (Snakehead) and Ho-na-nist-to (Howling Wolf). Her friend Mary Douglass Burnham, who was a deaconess at the American Episcopal Church and together with Sarah Mather worked as a teacher at Fort Marion, ensured that Zotom and O-kuh-ha-tuh were further trained after their release, with the financial support of the Pendletons. Both fomer warriors were eventually ordained as deacons of the Episcopal Church. O-kuh-ha-tah, was in 1985 canonized as a saint by the Episcopal Church, while Zotom early on abandoned his Christian faith, returned to the remains of his tribe, and resumed his traditional way of life.

 

 

When he was baptized as a Christian, O-kuh-ha-tah took the name David Pendleton Oakerhater, probably as a sign that he had definitely left his original faith. His previous name meant Sun Dancer and among the Cheyenne he was from a young age regarded as an unusually talented Medicine Man and as the youngest warrior who ever had submitted himself to and endured entire Sundance ordeal. Already at the age of fourteen, O-kuh-ha-tah had become a member of Woo-ka-nay´s Bowstring League. Before he was imprisoned, O-kuh-ha-tah was a well-known warrior who had taken part in battles against hostile Otoe and Missouri tribes. After surviving both the Sand Creek and Washita massacres, O-kuh-ha-tah had actively fought the U.S. Army for several years before surrendering with Howling Wolf and arriving at Fort Sill. Like Howling Wolf, O-kuh-ha-tah was initially proud of his past as one of the Cheyenne's youngest and boldest warriors, and as such, he appeared in his ledger drawing below. Together with Howling Wolf and Zotom, David Pendleton is now considered as the best among Fort Marion´s many ledger artists.

 

 

Although most of Fort Marion's prisoners proved to be astonishingly adaptable, there were exceptions. For example, Mochi, Buffalo Calf. Her bloody past and refusal to attend classes made both teachers and the white guards fear and avoid her. Julia Gibbs, another of the teachers, wrote about Mochi:

 

She spent hours staring out at the sea and never wavered in her refusal “to take the white man’s road.”

 

 

Mochi had been twenty-four years old when a drunken soldier during the Sand Creek massacre broke into her parents' teepe, killed her mother bya shot to the head and raped Mochi, who then shot the perpetrator with her grandfather's rifle. She managed to escape the massacre and a few years later married the famous Medicine Man and warrior Medicine Water, known as one of Woo-ka-nay's toughest fighters. For ten years, Mochi actively fought alongside her husband.

 

The couple was high on the army's list of “murderous Indians”. In 1874 they had participated in an assault on a reconnaissance party led by Captain Oliver Francis Short. The captain and five of his men were killed and scalped. One month later, Medicine Water's gang ambushed John German and his family, who were traveling through Kansas with their ox-drawn wagon. German, his son and two daughters were killed and scalped. Mochi killed his wife Liddia with a tomahawk blow. Four of the killed couple's daughters were spared and later handed over to a fort where they could testify about what had happened.

 

 

 

Both Medicine Water and Mochi refused to cooperate with anyone in the fort. According to their fellow prisoners, Medicine Water was openly aggressive towards Captain Pratt, whom he considered to be a cloven-tongued manipulator who used “his trained Indians” as pawns in a political game intended to increase his personal prestige and career. Medicine Water's “stubborn refuse to cooperate” meant that he on several occasions was placed in solitary confinement.

 

Mochis and Medicine Water's lack of cooperation, as well as the fact that several of Fort Marion's prisoners after their release chose to return to a miserable life on the reservations, instead of embracing the blessings of civilization, suggest that Pratt's project to transform “his” Florida Boys into well-behaved American citizens were not entirely successful. Model students like Zotom and Howling Wolf returned after a couple of years as “well-adjusted Americans”, to the faith and life of their fathers. A ledger drawing by Howling Wolf depicts how a group of Native American students attentively listen to an enthusiastic teacher, while a somewhat spooky, Native American spirit figure seems to smile at the spectacle.

 

 

What is seldom pointed out in connection with so-called acculturation processes is that they do not always mean that so-called indigenous peoples adopt to “modern life”. Among the prisoners was a “Kiowa”, a certain “Dick” who actually was a former escaped black slave from the Southern States who had been “adopted” by the Kiowas. Julia Gibbs also mentions that a Cheyenne warrior who in fact

 

was an Irishman who had been abducted as a child – we called him Irish and he was always full of fun and joy.

 

A couple of other Cheyenne warriors were mestizos from Mexico. Speaking of “Dick”, I might mention an excellent book that gives a completely different picture of the Wild West than the one I had been used to from books and movies, namely Willam Katz´s The Black West, about African-American cowboys, cavalrymen, fur hunters, settlers and "Indians".

 

 

In interwar Europe, there was, just like nowadays, a tension between internationally/globally oriented groups and nationalist/chauvinist ideologies. The Belgian folklorist Albert Marinus and the French social anthropologist Arnold van Gennep treid to convince the League of Nations (NF) to establish an organization that would promote cultural exchange between all countries of the world. Van Gennep in particular was preoccupied by what he considered to be a dangerous trend in European populism. van Gennep, whose studies on rites de passages have had a major impact on a number of behavioral sciences, not least History of Religions and Social Anthropology, was born in Germany to a German father and a Dutch mother, but mainly worked at universities in Switzerland and France.

 

At that time and even now, something I discovered when I worked at UNESCO in Paris a few years ago is that world leaders were well aware that culture and power are interlinked and many of them are consequently reluctant to accept such cultural expressions they considerto be dangerous for their political agendas. Accordingly, it took a long time before the NF was bold enough to support a project that paid homage to all the world's different cultures, intending to present them as a quest for community, joy and creativity.

 

 

On condition that they absolutely did not engage in oral storytelling traditions and so-called popular religion, 1928 gave a go-ahead for the Commission des Arts et Traditions Populaires (CIAP) to convene a congress in Prague with the participation of a large number of the world's leading ethnographers and social anthropologists. The event was unusually extensive and successful. Not only researchers were welcomed but also representatives of different indigenous peoples, who were treated with far greater respect than has previously been the case at international gatherings.

 

 

The Congress Secretariat received 230 academic papers, of which 180 were printed in an epoch-making book – Art Populaire published in 1931 in Paris. Like the Congress, the contributions emphasized art and a feature that attracted much attention in Prague was when a group of Prairie Indians and ethnologists presented a collection of ledger drawings from Fort Marion, made by Howling Wolf, David Pendleton Oakerhater and Zotom, among others. Howling Wolf and Zotom were dead and the eighty-four-year-old Oakhalter could not attend, but their art ignited an interest in Native Americans that had been thriving in Europe ever since the so called era of Romantic Art, expressed in works like François-René de Chateaubriand's wildly popular novel Atala from 1801.

 

 

The Prague Congress coincided with the a Czechoslovak popular movement called trampling, which meant that young people sought refuge in the wilderness that remained in the country, where live “Indian life”, mainly inspired by Karl May's books. As early as 1930, there were more than 50,000 active trampers in the Czechoslovakia. The movement has survived, something I found a year ago when I saw an exhibition about Czech tramps at the Ethnographic Museum in Prague. There I once again, among other things, saw Zdeněk Burian's illustrations for my childhood's Karl May books.

 

 

The Ledger Artists had almost all been imrpisoned Native American warriors who at the same time and for a short while had parctised their art a various prison institutions. In Prague, Congress visitors discovered that the ledger artists portrayed a self-perceived reality and thus offered a unique insight into how the indigenous people of the United States perceived their existence. Suddenly, these coloured drawings on loose-leaf sheets and notebook that previously generally had been despised as awkward attempts to make a small profit visitors who had come to gape at exotic prisoners.

 

Captain Richard Pratt and the benevolent female teachers at Fort Marion had more or less consciously been engaged in what Pratt in a speech he gave at George Mason University in 1892, describes as “killing the Indian and saving the Man”:

 

It is a great mistake to think that the Indian is born an inevitable savage. He is born a blank, like all the rest of us. Left in the surroundings of savagery, he grows to possess a savage language, superstition, and life. We, left in the surroundings of civilization, grow to possess a civilized language, life, and purpose. Transfer the infant white to the savage surroundings, he will grow to possess a savage language, superstition, and habit. Transfer the savage-born infant to the surroundings of civilization, and he will grow to possess a civilized language and habit. [If] we cease to teach the Indian that he is less than a man then we will recognize that he is capable in all respects as we are, and that he only needs the opportunities and privileges which we possess to enable him to assert his humanity and manhood.

 

 

The idealistic Richard Pratt realized the importance of art as a culture carrier and understood that if he wanted to make the general public concerned about the welfare of Native Americans  he  had to  make it interested in the uniqueness of Native American culture, the next step would then be to obliterate these “primitive traits” from the Indians mind.

 

During weekdays, Captain Pratt forbade his prisoners to speak their respective languages ​​and under threat of punishment forced them to speak English and they were also forced to wear their prison uniforms. During weekends, however, visitors were invited to the facility and then the prisoners were allowed to wear traditional costumes and weapons they had manufactured in the prison's textile studio and workshops. In such outfits they were also allowed to move relatively freely in the town where they also were free to sell their handicrafts and drawings. Pratt tried to inspire his prisoners to depict their dreams and hopes in their notebooks, though if he had hoped that they would draw and paint expectations of a “civilized” existence, he was mistaken. Ledger Art came to be nostalgic depictions of Native American´s earler life in freedom; their rites, visions, wars and history.

 

 

Joyce Szabo, who has written extensively about Ledger Art, stated that her discovery

 

of it was such an emotional experience for me. I realized that the drawings were not about hunting or battle, they were about freedom. It’s kinda like the blues.

 

Her observation is highly applicable to Howling Wolf's drawings. By and large, he painted and drew only during his time as a prisoner of war, and he sold all his work, almost all of which was autobiographical. When he presented himself in the drawings, he did so together with a small hieroglyph depicting a howling wolf.

 

 

He never repeated himself and several of Howling Wolf's drawings have an almost abstract ornamentation.

 

 

The art of the Ledger Artists did not spring from nowhere. It was based on a long tradition in which mainly women had painted abstract, meaningful patterns on clothes, moccasins, teepes, shields and many more everyday objects.

 

 

Men decorated themselves and their horses with “war paint”, remembered and exposed their exploits through the feathers that they artistically arranged in their magnificent war bonnets. On buffalo and deer skins they kept “count of the days”, i.e. depicted hunting, war scenes and visions.

 

 

Admittedly, even most ledger drawings describe hunting and fighting, often quite cruel incidents, several nevertheless depict the quiet everyday life in the Cheyenne villages.

 

 

Some of them also depict of romantic encounters and non-ritual dances, such as here where Howling Wolf and his friend The Feathered Bear try to impress two girls fetching water.

 

 

Cheyenne and Sioux are often portrayed as misogynistic and bloodthirsty warriors, though in their poetry and art there are plenty of love poems and depictions of romantic cravings. As in this song that was recorded by the beginning of the last century by the music anthropologist Frances Theresa Densmore:

 

In her canoe I see her,

maiden of my delighted eyes.

I see in the rippling of the water

the trailing sipped from her paddling blade,

a signal sent to me.

Ah, maiden of my desire,

give me a place in your canoe.

Hand me the paddle blade,

and I will steer you away wherever you would go.

 

 

Virtually all of the prioners at Fort Marion had been members of Warrior Leagues and were thus visionaries who had suffered the trials of the Sundance, a prerequisite for entering the warrior communities. This could have been a contributing reason to why several Prairie Indians later converted to Catholicism, which often emphasizes the torments Christ as a sacrificial death that proved his greatness. How Jesus through a personal sacrifice overcame the suffering and humiliation brought about through of life and thus to his fellow beings gave hope of salvation. A true Medicine Man.

 

 

While imprisoned at Fort Marion, Howling Wolf's eye sight deteriorated and it was feared that he would become blind. The fort's doctors recommended expert help that at the time was available in Boston, where a well-known doctor performed so-called extra-capsular cataract extractions. Alice Key Pendleton paid for Howling Wolf's travel, treatment, and subsistence. Unexpectedly, the complicated operation succeeded and Howling Wolf's vision improved. During his several-month-long convalescence in Boston, Howling Wolf became impressed by “the white man's way of life”. He already spoke fluent English and Spanish and now dressed in European clothes. When he was after his return to Fort Marion was pardoned after five months, Howling Wolf moved back to his relatives, together with his father, Minimic, Eagle's Head, with whom he had shared his imprisonment.

 

 

For five years Howling Wolf worked in the Oklahoma reservation as teacher and policeman.  However,  when his father, who had never given up his traditional faith and remained a revered member of the Bowstring League, died in 1881 Howling Wolf renounced his Christian faith and retrieved his former name, Ho-na- nist-to. He shouldered his father's leadership over the Bowstring League and began to propagate for his tribe's return to their former traditions. He wrote a letter to Captain Pratt at Fort Marion declaring that:

 

You opened the white man's path to me and that was good. At the fort you gave us clothes,

but when we had been here one year they were about all gone […] When I hunted the Buffalo I was not poor. When I was with you I did not have want for anything, but here I am poor. I would like to go out on the planes hunting, since there I could roam at will and never come back again.

 

Like his father, Ho-na-nist-to had been a great admirer of Woo-ka-nay, who among White Men had been labeled as a bad Indian. Howver, according to Ho-na-nist-to, Woo-ka-nay had been a great Medicine Man. "He could spend hours preparing his medicine, his mind and his spirit." A Medicine Man called Ice had given Woo-ka-nay the first feathers for what would become  an  impressive  war bonnet. Ice, who later came to be known as White Bull, had assured Woo-ka-nay that as long as he wore his war bonnet in battle he would not be killed, but it was on the condition that he never took a white man by the hand and before a battle did not touch iron.

 

 

At Fort Marion, Howling Wolf drew and painted a several pictures of his hero Woo-ka-nay. As in the drawing below where we see Howling Wolf at the top right and Woo-ka-nay at the bottom left. The artwork depicts how in a place surrounded by tepees, the Bowstring League prepares for battle. In the middle are seven warriors seated, six of them carry the league´s sacred spears, while the man in carries its coupe stickStars and Stripes sway over them as a sign that the ceremony is taking place before one of the warrior skirmishes with the US Army.

 

 

Ho-na-nist-to was present when Woo-ka-nay was killed during the battle of Beecher Island. The warlord had before and during the fighting touched iron in the sense that he had received a rifle from one of his followers. During the battle, Woo-ka-nay dropped his war bonnet and in the isntant after that was hit by a rifle shot straight in his heart. An incident that that convinced Ho-na-nist-to that, after all, the old visionaries had been right in their beliefs and predictions. It was because of this conviction that Hoewling Wolf after his father had died took back his Native American name and returned to the faith of his ancestors.

 

 

As he approached the age of seventy, Ho-na-nist-to realized that his family was suffering from its chronic poverty and decided to take advantage of the Pale Faces' interest in Native American exoticism, which he had experienced during his time at Fort Marion. Together with his sons, Ho-na-nist-to decided to organize a Wild West Show with dance numbers, indigenous music and horse shows. The show became relatively successful and Ho-na-nist-to was able to acquire both a house and a car. It was when he drove home to Oklahoma from one of his shows in Houston, Texas, that he in 1927 died in a car accident.

 

 

Catlin, George (2004) North American Indians. London: Penguin Classics. Deloria, Vine (1970) We Talk, You Listen: New Tribes, New Turf. New York: Macmillan. Densmore, Frances Theresa (1917) Poems from Sioux and Chippewa Songs. Washington D.C.: Unkown publisher. Erdoes, Richard (1972) Lame Deer, seeker of visions. New York: Simon and Schuster. Grinnell, George Bird (1962) Blackfoot Lodge Tales: Story of a Prairie People. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Grinnell, George Bird (2019) The Fighting Cheyennes. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. Hultkrantz, Åke (1967) The Religions of the American Indians. University of California Press. Hutton, Paul Andrew (1985) Phil Sheridan & His Army. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Katz, William Loren (1987) The Black West. Seattle, WA: Open Hand Publishing. Kopp, Robert (2004) Baudelaire: Le soleil noir de la modernité. Paris: Gallimard. Littlefield, Daniel and James Parins (1998) Ke-ma-ha: The Omaha Stories of Francis La Flesche. Lincoln: Nebraska University Press. Marquis, Thomas B. (2003) Wooden Leg: A Warrior Who Fought Custer. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Moberg, Vilhelm (1995) The Last Letter Home. St. Paul: The Minnesota Historical Press. Pearce, Ron Harvey (1965) The Savages of America: A Study of the Indians and the Idea of Civilization. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. Powers, Thomas (2010) The Killing of Crazy Horse. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Rogan, Bjarne (2006) ”Folk Art and Politics in Inter-War Europe: An Early Debate on Applied Ethnology”, Folk Life No. 45(1). Stenimetz, Paul B., S.J. (1980) Pipe, Bible and Peyote Among the Oglala Lakota. Stockholm: Almquist & Wiksell International. Szabo, Joyce M. (2011) Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage: Plains Drawings by Howling Wolf and Zotom at the Autry National Center. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research. Thorpe Benjamin (2010) The Poetic Edda. Overland Park KS: Digireads. Trump, Donald J. (2020) ”Remarks at South Dakota’s 2020 Mount Rushmore Celebration,” https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-south-dakotas-2020 Turner, Frederick W. (ed.) (1977) The Portable North American Indian Reader. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/13/2020 00:53

Howlin´ Wolf, d.v.s. Chester Arthur Burnett (1910-1976), var stor i flera avseenden. Inte enbart var han en och nittioåtta centimeter lång, vägde etthundratjugofem kilo och hade femtioett i skonummer. Howlin´ Wolf var dessutom en av tidernas största bluesgitarrister, hemmahörande på bluesens Parnass i sällskap med de främsta bland Delta- och Chicago-bluesmännen. Som Louis Armstrong var jazz, var Howlin´ Wolf blues; en rytmisk personifikation i en kedja som leder till en mängd andra musikformer. Inspiration för giganter som Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan och Iggy Pop, eller oförglömliga rockband som Led Zeppelin, Beatles och Rolling Stones. Det var den store stonesbeundraren Stefan Tell som då vi var klasskamrater introducerade mig till Howlin´ Wolf. Sedan dess har jag inte tröttnat på att lyssna varken till honom eller de andra bluesmästarna från hans generation – Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Elmore James och John Lee Hooker. Samtliga från Mississippi, med hårda liv bakom sig och rötter djupt ner i Söderns mylla och elände, vars styrka, smärta och djup de tolkade och spred genom sin magistrala musik.

 

 

Inte undra på att jag hajade till då jag för en tid sedan i en italiensk tidskrift fick syn på en teckning av Howling Wolf, men det visade sig att det inte var bluesartisten som skapat konstverket utan en cheyenneindian med samma namn. Vad Chester Arthur Burnett hade gemensamt med sin namne var kanske inte mycket mer än namnet Den Ylande Vargen, ett epitet som båda använde även om de hette något annat, cheyennens namn var Ho-na-nist-to. En annan förenande faktor var givetvis att de båda tillhörde befolkningsgrupper som blivit illa behandlade och dessutom föraktade av den ”vita” befolkningsmajoriteten i sitt land. Dessutom hade Chester Arthur Burnett, likt många andra svarta från The Deep South, indianskt påbrå – hans morfar var Choktaw, den största ursprungsbefolkningen i Mississippi.

 

Bilden jag såg hade Howling Wolf tecknat med tusch och vattenfärg på ett linjerat blad av samma typ som de som fanns i min barndoms skolas skrivböcker. Färgerna och de skarpa konturlinjerna påminde mig om de hundratals teckningar jag själv brukade sitta och plita med då jag kommit hem från skolan. En vana som jag säkerligen delade med en mängd andra barn i min ålder. Men Howling Wolfs teckningar var grundade i en alldeles speciell tradition och hade en elegant och ornamental särart som gjorde att de inte alls framstod som ”barnsliga”. De ingick i en genre som  hade utövats av fler artister än Howling Wolf. Det var tillfångatagna indiankrigare som utövat denna så kallade ledger art, så kallad eftersom de flesta av de bevarade teckningarna hade gjorts på sidor utrivna  från begagnade ledgers, kassaböcker.

 

Snart fann jag flera ledgerkonstverk och medan jag betraktade dem mindes jag min barndoms och tidiga ungdoms stora indianintresse. Jag började inte tala förrän efter det att jag fyllt tre och läsa lärde jag mig först vid sju års ålder, efter att ha börjat skolan. Men efter att jag börjat tala har jag sällan hållit tyst och jag har så fort jag fått minsta tillfälle till det, slukat bok efter bok.

 

 

Kort efter det att att jag lärt mig läsa fördjupade jag mig i ett allomfattande intresse för ”vilda djur” och ”indianer”. Jag steg långt in i den ena ”indianboken” efter den andra och hade snart fått i mig samtliga Edward S. Ellis böcker om Hjortfot. De som gavs ut av B. Wahlströms Ungdomsböcker och hade gröna ryggar för att visa att de var ”pojkböcker”. Flickböcker, som min yngsta syster läste, hade röda ryggar.

 

 

Jag ägde en fjäderskrud och var speciellt förtjust i ett litet gevär, ett sådant jag inbillade mig att Simon Kenton, en av hjältarna i hjortfotsböckerna haft då han i början av artonhundratalet tillsammans med sin vän, den kristne shawneeindianen Hjortfot, smög omkring i obanade urskogar längsmed floderna Kentucky och Ohio. Pälsjägaren och stigfinnaren Kenton och hans trofaste indianvän var ständigt hotade av opålitliga och mordiska krigare från de hedniska irokeserna, som till skillnad från den ädle Hjortfot hatade vita nybyggare, som de gladeligen slaktade så fort de fick tag på dem.

 

 

Minns hur jag över bokskogarnas torra löv försökte göra min steg lika ljudlösa som Hjortfots varit. Jag ritade scener ur indianböckerna och lekte med mina indianfigurer i de bergslandskap som min far av hönsnät och gips tilllverkat år mig. Eftersom Far var nattredaktör och därför höll sig hemma under dagarna hade han, då jag kom hem från skolan, tid att leka med mig.

 

 

Jag minns märkligt nog också hur jag första gången blev bekant med Hjortfot. Kort efter det att jag lärt mig läsa tillbringade familjen någon sommarmånad utanför Varberg, i ett hus som ägdes av en fiskare och som låg mitt emot Getterön. Då vi efter ett dopp i havet tillsammans gick tillbaka hem genom starrgräset berättade min mor hur hon som barn slukat böckerna om Hjortfot och hennes uppskattning fick mig att så snart som möjligt stiga in i Ohios och Kentuckys skogar.

 

 

Givetvis läste jag också Fenimore Cooper och Karl May och en mängd andra indianboksförfattare, men det var först då jag av min far fått Indianklubbens årsböcker som jag började inse hur indianerna verkligen varit och är. De där böckerna innehöll spännande och ofta upprörande verklighetsskildringar och ”indianerna” förvandlades gradvis till verkliga människor.

 

 

Jag läste även Indianklubbens specialutgåvor, exempelvis George Catlins fascinerande Medicinmän och krigare som skrevs 1841 och i vilken konstnären Catlin sympatiskt och insiktsfullt skildrade sina resor bland präriernas olika indianfolk, deras liv och tankar – öppet och nyfiket, fritt från paternalism. Då det 1846 ställdes ut i Paris imponerades ingen mindre än den store poeten och konstkännaren Charles Baudelaire av Catlins porträtt av Stu-mick-o-súcks, krigshövding för svartfotsindianernas Káínawaklan:

 

Mr. Catlin har på ett utmärkt sätt gestaltat den stolta och rättframma karaktären, det ädla uttrycket hos detta modiga folk. […] Genom sina vackra dag och sitt kroppsspråks frimodighet får dessa vildar oss att inse skönheten hos antika skulpturer. Då det kommer till färgen har den något mystiskt över sig som tilltalar mig mer än vad jag förmår uttrycka.

 

 

Hövdingens märkliga namn översattes med Bisonoxens Ryggfett, det är dock inte så underligt som det låter eftersom bisonoxens ryggpuckel ansågs vara en stor delikatess och namnet var därmed en hederstitel.

 

 

En annan av av ”Indianklubbens Bästa” var Albert Widéns Svenskarna och Siouxupproret, en bok som fördjupade vad jag tidigare läst om i Stig Ericssons tämligen enkla äventyrssoman Indianupproret. Då jag flera år senare gick in i Vilhelm Mobergs utvandrarepos bar jag med mig intrycken från Widéns skildring av kulturkraschen mellan svenska nybyggare och desperata siouxer. I Mobergs Sista brevet hem finns en gripande skildring av massavrättningen av trettioåtta dakotakrigare:

 

Det var en kall vintermorgon med en bitande nordanvind som från prärierna svepte in över fängelsegården. Fångarna fördes ut i en grupp med händerna bundna bakom ryggen. Ingen av dem yttrade ett trotsigt ord. Då de kommit ut på gården såg de framför sig galgarna vars rep vajade i vinden. En rysning for genom gruppen: De började sjunga. Alla samtidigt. Gemensamt sjöng de sin dödssång.

Ett kusligt genomträngande läte steg ur de dödsdömda fångarnas strupar; det lät som ett utdraget ij: Ijiji - ijiji - ijiji. En enda klagande stavelse, att beständigt, sorgligt ijijiji - ijijiji - ijiji - ijiji. Indianerna sjöng sin dödssång. Från trettioåtta mänskliga strupar steg trettioåtta varelsers slutliga yttrande: Ijiji - ijiji -ijiji.

 

 

Fångarna gick mot galgarna – järnringen med trettioåtta svängande rep – de sjöng oavbrutet medan de närmade sig, de sjöng hela vägen. De sjöng när de steg upp på schavotten, de sjöng medan de väntade under repen, de fortsatte sjunga då repen lades kring deras halsar. De sjöng under den sista minuten av sina liv.

 

 

Likt Mobergs berättande grundade sig Widéns indianskildringar på en gedigen förtrogenhet med bevarade källor kring den svenska amerikamigrationen – brev, dagböcker och vetenskaplig litteratur. Widéns berättarkonst är vitt skild från Mobergs och han förblir märkligt stereotyp. Något jag märkte först nu då jag läser om Widéns bok om siouxupproret och hans talrika artiklar i indianklubbsböckerna.

 

Jag får en känsla av att Widén även när han försöker nyansera äldre indianframställningar och förmedla en positiv bild av den amerikanska ursprungsbefolkningen så anas det bakom den lovvärda ansatsen att han har svårt för att att befria sig från seglivade schabloner. Ett visst mått av svenskchauvinism smyger sig också in genom hans ofta upprepade konstaterande att svenskar i allmänhet visade stor tolerans gentemot siouxer och andra ursprungsbefolkningar, något som säkerligen inte alltid var fallet. Likaså kan Widéns strävanden att nyansera den ”gängse bilden av indianen” förfalla till klichén av den ”den ädle vilden”. En tendens som även är märkbar i flera av essäerna i Indianklubbens årsböcker, som förutom att de var mansdominerade (jag har nu då jag bläddrat igenom samtliga 18 böcker i serien enbart funnit bidrag från två kvinnor – Yvonne Svenström och Anna-Britta Hellbom) även vinnlade sig om att vara spännande och lättlästa, vilket i och för sig är lovvärt.

 

 

Nåväl, Widén lyckas dock förmedla känslan av desperation hos svältande siouxer som upplevt hur bisonoxarna försvunnit från deras jaktmarker, alltmedan nybyggare högg ner skogarna, odlade marken, fiskade i deras vatten och sköt deras villebråd. Då handelsmän och politiker lurat dem på de traktatspengar och förnödenheter de utlovats då de gav upp anspråk på mark och lika rättigheter brast tålamodet hos flera sioux- och cheyennekrigare. En våldsvåg svepte fram över mellersta och södra Minnesota. Uppskattningsvis dödades 800 nybyggare, däribland flera svenskar och norrmän, alltmedan fler än 30 000 i panik flydde österut, bland dem 3 000 svenskar.

 

Den amerikanska centralregeringens motreaktion blev våldsam och skoningslös. Den ledde till flera massakrer på ursprungsbefolkningen och fängslande av ”upprorsledarna”. Efter en summarisk rättegång dömdes 303 dakotakrigare till döden. Efter en begäran om att ”nåd borde gå före rätt” lyckades Minnesotas anglikanske biskop Henry Whipple få president Lincoln att sanktionera den offentliga hängningen av ”enbart” 38 massmördare på torget i staden Mankato. Domen verkställdes den 26:e december 1862, Det är och var den största kollektiva massavrättningen som ägt rum i USA. Betecknande är att den drabbade en hel grupp individer, istället för enskilda personer. Det var ”indianer” som avrättades, inte männsikor som du och jag.

 

 

Det är inte lätt att finna individen bakom schablonerna, något jag antar att många medmänniskor tillhörande mer eller mindre maktlösa befolkningsgrupper känner: Detta att ständigt tvingas bära med sig en stämpel på hud och själ som indian, neger, kines, invandrare, med andra ord – en främling. Vine Deloria (1933-2005) som var sioux har i flera böcker beskrivit en sådan känsla:

 

Problemet med stereotyper är egentligen inte en fråga om vilken ras du tillhör utan grundar sig mer på bristande kunskap och ett begränsat perspektiv. Även om minoritetsgrupper genomlidit det vita samhällets förlöjligande karaktäristik av dem, bör det inte innebära att även de tvunget måste falla i samma fälla genom att helt enkelt vända på ett perspektiv som gjort dem till en kliché. Minoritetsgrupper bör bryta igenom en sådan retorisk blockad genom att inse att de är ett ”folk” som alla andra. Detta innebär skapandet av en ”ny” historia, ett nytt synsätt, inte enbart ett tillrättaläggande av en tolkning som redan givits av det vita Amerika.

 

 

Den andra volymen i bokserien Indianklubbens bästa var Thomas B. Marquis Sitting Bull-krigare i elden (originaltiteln var Wooden Leg: A worrier who fought Custer). Även den läsningen var jag förberedd på efter att ha läst en äventyrsbok om indianer. I det fallet hade det varit Harry Kullmans Buffalo Bill som faktiskt var mer effektivt och spännande berättad än hjortfotsböckerna.

 

 

Kullman hade fått mig att läsa Marquis bok, som byggde på intervjuer med flera åldrade cheyenner som deltagit i striden vid Little Bighorn 1876, då samtliga 235 soldater från en av Det Sjunde Kavalleriets tre bataljoner, samt deras ledare, Överstelöjtnant George Armstrong Custer, nedgjordes till sista man. I den bataljen deltog även Hunkpapa-Lakota siouxernas ledare Gall, som Kullman i sin roman felaktigt påstod hade blivit jagad och slutligen dödad av Buffalo Bill. I själva verket undkom Gall den amerikanska arméns hämnd genom att fly till Kanada där han faktiskt kontaktades av Buffalo Bill som erbjöd honom att uppträda i hans Wild West Show. Till skillnad från Sitting Bull tackade Gall nej till erbjudandet med konstaterandet att: ”Jag är inte ett djur och kan därför vägra att låta mig exponeras inför en betalande publik”. Gall återvände sedermera till USA och blev såväl bonde som domare innan han dog 1895.

 

 

Det var när Thomas Marquis arbetade som läkare i olika reservat för ursprungsbefolkningen i Montana som han kom i kontakt med cheyenner som deltagit i det så kallade det Stora siouxkriget som bland annat innefattade slaget vid Little Bighorn. Flera av Marquis informanter var utmärkta berättare och hans redogör för deras upplevelser och en mängd egen forskning kring cheyennernas seder och bruk.

 

Marquis kom i början av 1922 till indianagenturen Lame Deer där han öppnade läkarpraktik. De flesta av hans patienter var utfattiga, vid dålig hälsa, uppgivna och illusionslösa, dessutom dök Marquis upp under en ovanligt omfattande tuberkulosepidemi som under hans tid i reservatet under flera års tid skördade en mängd dödsoffer.

 

Till en början var cheyennerna misstänksamma gentemot den vite läkaren, men då Marquis visat dem förståelse och respekt och dessutom intresse för deras seder och historia vann han förtroende bland flera av dem. De som kunde tala engelska satte Marquis i kontakt med gamla krigare som kunde berätta om det som intresserade honom mest av allt – deras krig mot den amerikanska armén. Snart kunde Marquis tala cheynnernas språk, skrev ner de gamlas berättelser och började publicera böcker om deras liv och historia. Nedan ett foto taget av Marquis som visar hur veteranerna Little Sun, Wolf Chief, Big Beaver och Richard Wooden Leg studerar en karta över området kring Litttle Big Horn. Samtliga hade varit var med vid drabbningen, i händerna har de ”solfjädrar” framställda av örnvingar.

 

 

Då jag i dessa COVIDtider läser om Marquis finner jag att det var dess dödliga föregångare Spanska sjukan, som mellan mars 1918 och juni 1920 skördade mellan 50 och 100 miljoner dödsoffer världen över, som förde Marquis till Montana. Som ung läkare anmälde han sig som frivillig till det som skulle bli det Första världskriget, men istället för att sändas till Frankrike fick Marquis omedelbart gripa in för att ta hand om rekryter som dog som flugor i ett läger vid staden Lytle i Georgia.

 

I Haskell County, en kommun med 1 720 invånare, hade läkaren Loring Miner i februari 1918 funnit att en mängd av hans patienter insjuknat i en aggressiv influensa som hos flera av dem utvecklades till en form av lunginflammation med dödlig utgång. Loring misstänkte att sjukdomen spreds från insjuknade grisar och meddelade till myndigheterna sin oro i en utförlig rapport. Han misstänkte att att han upptäckt källan till vad som kunde bli en ytterst smittsam och dödlig epidemi. Lorings varningar ignorerades.

 

Femtio mil från Haskell låg det väldiga miltärlägret i Funston med fler än 56 000 rekryter som väntade på att skeppas över till de franska slagfälten. Flera haskellbor besökte söner och släktingar i lägret och snart började soldater dö i lunginflammation. Den 18:e mars nådde smittan lägren Camp Forrest och Greenleaf i Georgia och det var dit armén sände Thomas Marquis.

 

 

Då Marquis i augusti 1918 slutligen kom till Europa skickades han som ”expert på Spanska sjukan” till de stora hotell på Franska Rivieran som nu tjänade som sjukhus för dödligt sjuka soldater. Då Marquis i juni 1919 kom tillbaka till USA var även han svårt sjuk i den dödliga influensan. Då han tillfrisknat ville Marquis komma så långt bort som möjligt från soldater och massdöd och hamnade därmed i det avlägsna Montana.

 

Hos cheyennerna fann Marquis den präriekultur som blivit till arketypen för folks uppfattning av den nordamerikanske indianen, detta trots den stora variation av olika kulturer, seder och språk som innefattas av den amerikanska ursprungsbefolkningen. Det rörde sig om en nomadiskt grundad buffeljagande hästkultur som utvecklats under sexton- och sjuttonhundratalet och kommit att prägla tillvaron för befolkningsgrupper som siouxer, svartfötter, apacher, arapahoer och … cheyenner.

 

 

Tänker folk i allmänhet sig en ”indian” ser de framför sig en beriden gestalt med en magnifik fjäderskrud som i sin äventyrligt romantiska framtoning har blivit till sinnebilden för en ädel, obunden och vältalig uppenbarelse som lever i nära kontakt med naturen, men den skapelsen har även en motsatt nidbild som framställer indianer som tjutande vettvillingar vars besinningslösa mördande och skalperande bestialitet drabbade harmlösa nybyggare, som i bästa fall kunde undsättas av blårockar i tjänst hos USAs oförvägna och hjältemodiga kavalleri.

 

 

Hästen och bufflarna hade radikalt ändrat cheyennernas livsföring. Likt flera anda prärieindianer hade de tidigare levt i skogsområden söder om de väldiga sjöarna Michigan och Erie där de livnärt sig på odlingar med majs, zucchini, bönor och rissamt fiskat, jagat och samlat vad de funnit i skogen. De hade dock under sextonhundratalet börjat röra sig västerut, antagligen tvingade att göra så på grund av stridigheter och folkomflyttningar som orsakats av de välorganiserade irokesernas expansion från sina ursprungsområden.

 

Stridigheter mellan grupperingar inom den amerikanska ursprungsbefolkningen var uppenbarligen endemisk och en del av deras ”krigarkulter” präglades av raider in i grannfolks territorier, kidnappningar, rituell tortyr och enviger som kunde ta sig uttryck i hänsynslös grymhet. Detta hindrade dock inte att ”fiendefolk” under längre perioder umgicks i fredlig samlevnad. Liksom på flera andra håll i Amerika levde cheyennerna i grannskapet av andra grupper med för dem obegripligt språk och skilda traditioner något som likväl inte omöjliggjorde giftermål, samt utbyte av idéer, erfarenheter och varor.

 

Liksom flera andra grupper av nordamerikanska ursprungsbefolkningar var det enligt cheyennerna en profet som fått dem att ändra sina levnadsvanor. Tomȯsévėséhe, Upprättstående Horn, hade fått en vision som sagt honom att cheyennerna liksom stäppernas folk måste förena sina krafter och söka styrka hos Solen och vid vårens slut varje år samlas för att söka insikt genom den rening och kraft den skänker. Efter att ha genomgått en sådan prövning blev Tomȯsévėséhe medicinman och hade därigenom insett att cheyennerna måste lämna de hyddor av flätverk och lera som de bodde i och istället tillverka konformiga tipis gjorda av buffelhudar som de kunde föra med sig då de följde bisonoxarnas vandringar. Hädanefter skulle cheyenner äta buffelkött, istället för fisk och grönsaker. De skulle bli fruktade krigare och hänge sig åt den tillförsikt och styrka som Soldansen gav.

 

 

Då de vandrade ut över stäpperna var det få cheyenner som sett en vit man, men de hade hört att de vita männsikornas ankomst fört med sig stora förändringar och dödat de olyckliga människor som drabbats av deras förödande närvaro. Det var inte enbart genom sitt antal och de nya vapen som de vita förde med sig som dödade och trängde undan de rättmätiga ägarna till jorden, utan främst ond medicin. Smittkoppor, influensa, kikhosta, tyfus och en mängd andra tidigare okända sjukdomar skördade mängder med offer bland ursprungsbefolkningarna. Med för dem obegriplig hastighet utraderades hela byar.

 

 

Då cheyennerna och andra folkgrupper i större mängder rörde sig ut över prärierna fann de där väldiga hjordar med bisonoxar. Uppskattningsvis 60 miljoner bufflar rörde sig i flockar som kunde innefatta hundratusentals enskilda djur, som då de skrämdes upp och besinningslöst började rusa framåt fick marken att vibrera. Ljudet från de panikslagna djurens råmande och deras galopperande hovar kallades av slättfolken för Präriens åskmuller. På savannerna betade även hjordar med förvildade hästar som spritt sig från områden som söderöver hade erövrats av spanska conquistadorer. Utan naturliga fiender och rikligt med föda hade hästarna snabbt förökat sig. De kallades mustanger, från det spanskans mesteño, vilsen, och det dröjde inte länge förrän indianerna lyckats tämja dem och på förbluffande kort tid hade de flesta präriefolk blivit skickliga ryttare som från hästryggarna effektivt jagade de talrika bufflarna. Snart hade präriefolken anpassat hela sin kultur och livssyn till denna nya tillvaro.

 

 

Lakota-medicinmannen John Tȟáȟča Hušté; Den lama eldshjorten, (1903-1976) förklarade:

 

Buffeln gav oss allt vi behövde. Utan den var vi ingenting. Våra tipis var gjorda av hans hud, som också blev vår säng, vår filt, vår vinterrock. Den var våra trumskinn, trumman som ljöd nätterna igenom; levande, helig. Av hans hud gjorde vi vattensäckar. Hans kött stärkte oss, blev kött av vårt kött. Inte den minsta del av hans kropp förslösades. Då vi lagt en glödhet sten i den blev hans mage vår soppkokare. Hans horn blev skedar, benen blev knivar och våra kvinnors sylar och nålar. Av hans senor tillverkade vi bågsträngar och tråd. Hans revben formades till slädar för våra barn, hans hovar blev till skallror. Hans mäktiga skalle, med fredspipan lutad mot den, blev vårt heliga altare. Då buffeln utplånats dödades indianen – den sanna, naturliga, "vilda" indianen.

 

 

Det fanns inom indianernas religiositet ett framträdande inslag av mystik som innebar att de i drömmar, i ensamhet, genom fasta och olika former av självplågeri sökte kontakt med de andevärldar de trodde sig vara omgivna av. En erfaren shaman kunde träda in och ut mellan olika världar. En pawnesång:

 

Heliga visioner:

Nu tröskeln de överskrider, mjukt de glider

till innanrummet hän,

mjukt de glider – heliga visioner!

– Till innanrummet hän.

 

Det rörde sig om ett sökande efter livets mening och vår plats i tillvaron:

 

Låt oss se, om detta är verkligt,

låt oss se, om detta verkligt,

livet jag lever?

Ni gudar, som finns överallt,

låt oss se om detta är verkligt,

livet jag lever.

 

 

I Andevärlden mötte visionären hjälpare och demoner och kunde själv förvandlas till sådana. Som i denna ledgerteckning från 1880 av lakotakrigaren och shamanen Čhetáŋ Sápa', Svarta Höken. Den föreställer Heyókȟa, en trickster och åskgud som buffelbehornad rider på en hästliknande varelse, även den med buffelhorn och örnklor. Varelsens svans har formen av en regnbåge som leder till andevärlden. Punkterna på demonhäst och ryttare representerar hagel. Heyókȟa var motsatsernas ande och representerade därmed både kyla och värme. Bredvid bilden har Svarta Höken skrivit: "Drömmen om, eller visionen av mig själv då jag förvandlats till en förgörare som rider på en buffelörn."

 

 

Som andra mysteriekulter var präriefolkens religion mångfacetterad och svårbegriplig, speciellt för någon som inte själv erfarit några visioner. Deras gudsuppfattning hade ett panteistiskt och samtidigt undrande drag, som i följande förklaring till sin tro som osageindianen Lekfulla Kalven gav Francis La Flesche. La Flesche (1857-1932) vars farfar varit fransman, därav namnet, blev USAs förste indianske, universitetsutbildade etnolog.

 

 

Min son ... de gamla, No-ho-zhi-ga, gav oss i sina sånger wi-ge-i. Som är ceremonier, symboler och allt sådant som de lärt av de omgivande mysterierna. Om detta fick de kunskap genom den makt som finns i wa-thi-ghto, makten att söka med själen. De talade om ljusets mysterier som om dagen strömmar ner över jorden och livnär allt som lever; om nattens mysterier som för oss öppnar synerna till den övre världens himlakroppar, hur de färdas, var och en på sin stig, utan att vidröra varandra. De sökte, länge, efter källan till allt liv och kom till sist fram till tanken att allt strömmar fram ur en osynlig kraft, som de gav namnet Wa-kon-tah.

 

Wa-kon-tah som hos Osage var namnet på den allsmäktiga skaparkraften, kan möjligen i stort sett likställas med cheyennernas föreställningar kring Ma´heo´o. Osage var liksom cheyennerna prärieindianer och liksom dem ägnade de sig åt Soldansen. Solen är inte liktydig med Ma´heo´o, men har på dennes uppdrag skapat jorden.

 

 

En legend hos Siksika, Svartfötterna, berättar om ursprunget till den första Soldansen. En ung man vid namn Payoo, Det sårade ansiktet, var djupt förälskad i en vacker flicka, men hennes far förklarade för honom att hans dotter sagt honom att hon inte tillhörde sin far utan Ki´sómma, SolenFör att kunna gifta sig med den av honom åtrådda flickan måste Payoo genomgå en prövning för att avgöra om han verkligen var värdig henne. Efter stora vedermödor kom Payoo fram till Solens boning. Solen hyllade Payoos efterlängtade aakíí wa, kvinna, som visat sig vara så vis att hon insett att hon, liksom alla människor, tillhörde Solen. Himlens och jorden härskare förklarade också att det var de uppoffringar han gjort för sin kärleks skull som nu gjort Payoo värdig att gifta sig med sin älskade.

 

Solen förde sedan Payoo till Himlens rand och visade honom därifrån världen medan han berättade hur den var uppbyggd och allt som är viktigt att förstå. Bland annat förklarade Solen:

 

Vilket av djuren har mest Nat-ó-ye, Helig solkraftDet har buffeln. Av alla djur älskar jag honom mest. Han är gjord för folket. Han är er föda och ert skydd. [...] Vad är bäst? Hjärnan eller hjärtat? Det är hjärnan. Hjärtat ljuger ofta, men aldrig hjärnan.

Solen ber Payoo att han tillsammans med den aakíí wa som han nu skänker honom skall uppföra den första soldansarenan. Den skall bli som himlen och jorden. Solen förklarar också varför människorna måste dansa till hans ära:

 

Jag är den enda hövdingen. Allt är mitt. Jag gjorde jorden, bergen, prärierna, floderna och skogen. Jag skapade människorna och alla djuren. Det är därför jag säger dig att det är jag som är hövding över allt. Jag kan aldrig dö. Det är sant att vintern gör mig gammal och svag, men varje sommar blir jag ung igen och det blir lättare om ni stödjer mig i det. [...] Hälften skall vara röd. Det är jag. Den andra hälften skall vara svart. Det är natten.

 

 

De flesta av cheyennernas olika klan- och stamledare var visionära mystiker som genom den karisma de skaffat genom drömmar och visioner vördades som medicinmän. Ordet medicin har gett upphov till förvirring hos de oinvigda. Det är en övergripande översättning av en mängd olika ord för ett begrepp som tycks delas av medlemmarna i olika stamgemenskaper, med vitt skilda språk. Kanske kan medicinbegreppet i viss mån kan förklaras genom att konstatera att det rör sig om närvaron av en andlig kraft som manifesteras i en person, på en plats eller genom en händelse, i ett föremål, eller som naturfenomen. Ordet har blivit till ett samlande begrepp för andlighet, makt, energi och i stort sett alla oförklarliga, men likväl sanna insikter. En medicin, ja … även en medicinman, innesluter i sig och bevarar sådan kraft. Medicinen kan komma som en gåva från andra sfärer, men måste i allmänhet sökas och förtjänas.

 

 

Ett sätt att nå insikt om huruvida du är värdig att mottaga en medicin kan ske genom ditt deltagande i Soldansen. I allmänhet tar en sådan ceremoni formen av en gemensam ritual, men det förekom också att en enskild person kunde söka visshet om sin kallelse genom att offentligt undergå en plågsam soldansritual. Den ovannämnde George Catlin beskrev hur han bevittnat en sådan prövning som kallades Se-in-i-solen.

 

En man enbart iförd ett ländskynke stack i köttet mellan varje bröstvårta och nyckelben in fingertjocka spetsade träbitar vid vilka rep av bisonoxhud fästes och anslöts till spetsen av en lång, kraftig, men böjlig slana som stadigt förankrats i marken. Mannen lutade sig sedan bakåt så att repen spändes och den långa stången böjdes mot honom. I ett hårt grepp höll han i ena handen sin medicinpåse och i den andra heliga pilar. Han började med blicken stelt riktad mot solen röra sig kring den hårt spända slanan. Mycket sakta följde han från gryning till kväll med ett steg i taget, till de entonigt rytmiska slagen från en trumma, solens färd över himlavalvet.

 

 

Hans vänner stod kring honom, sjungande lovsånger till hans styrka och dygder, alltmedan fiender och skeptiker skrattade och okvädade honom. Om han lyckats genomlida prövningen utan att svimma eller falla omkull innebar det att han hade ”god medicin” och förtjänade sina stamfränders tillit. Om han däremot inte lyckats uthärda sina plågor gavs honom ingen annan chans och han betraktades därefter som en ”svag man som trott mer om sig själv än han verkligen visat sig vara värd”.

 

Likt Israels folk, som hade sina lagtavlor och sin heliga ark, hade cheyennerna ett föremål, en medicin, som förborgade skapargudens kraft – Maahotse, Byltet med de heliga pilarna. Det rörde sig om fyra pilar; två för krigslycka, två för buffeljakt, och de hade av Ma´heo´o, kanske någon gång i början av sjuttonhundratalet, givits till medicinmannen Motsé'eóeveMa´heo´o var källan till universums energi, Ex´Ahest´Otse, som även den symboliserades av de fyra pilarna som då motsvarade Ex´Ahest´Otses fyra andeförvaltare. Dessa mäktiga andar härskade över de de fyra väderstrecken, månen, djuren, fåglarna och fiskarna. Solen som gav liv åt allt var Ex´Ahest´Otses främsta manifestation på jorden – det finns förutom jorden sju andra "sfärer". Genom fasta, bön, offer och deltagande i de heliga ceremonierna kunde en människa få del av Ex´Hest´Otses kraft.

 

 

Ex´Ahest´Otses kraft var inte alltid lika stark, likt naturen ändrade även den sig och den var som svagast under vintern, därför måste den förstärkas med hjälp av Solen vid den tid på året då den var som mäktigast. Då måste också Maahotse tillföras ny kraft, liksom männen i cheyennernas fyra krigarförbund, och detta skedde oftast i samband med Soldansen.

 

Den som av Ma´heo´o hade utsetts att undervisa cheyennerna om allt detta var Motsé'eóeve, vars namn härrör från motsé'eonȯtse, sött gräs, en växt som användes i de flesta av prärieindianers religiösa riter och som de även gned in sig i som en slags deodorant. Flera som mött dem har berättat om den speciella doft prärieindianerna hade.

 

Som förvaltare av de heliga pilarna kunde Motsé'eóeve förutsäga hästarnas tämjande, samt de vita männens och kornas ankomst. Han organiserade cheyennernas fyra, främsta krigarförbund, fastställde deras lagar och instiftade en styrande och lagstiftande församling bestående av fyra véhooó, ledare för var och en av de tio manahos, klanerna, som under firandet av den gemensamma Soldansen utsåg fyra Äldste till att vara hövdingar för hela cheyennenationen.

 

 

Soldansen förbereddes under månader, dess grunder och ideologi var samstämmig men dess karaktär skilde sig i detaljerna beroende på den Äldste som arrangerat den, men då han väl fastställt varje detalj kunde ingenting ändras. Soldansen samlade stammens samtliga medlemmar, men tidpunkt och orsak kunde variera. Dock var Soldansen i allmänhet en årligt förekommande ceremoni som ägde rum:

 

När bufflarna är som fetast.

Då timjans groddar är som längst.

Då häggens bär mognar.

När månen månen stiger och solen sjunker.

 

Ceremonierna varade i fyra dagar. Det var en tid för att samla styrka och återfå förlorade krafter, men också för att demonstrera mod och personlig uppoffring. Intentioner som återspeglades i en av de böner som förvaltaren av Maahotse ledde folket i vid Soldansens inledning:

 

Stora solmakt! Jag beder för mitt folk, att de må bli lyckliga under sommaren och att de må leva genom vinterns kyla. Många är sjuka och behövande. Hav medlidande med dem och låt dem överleva. Giv att de må leva länge och ha överflöd! Må vi utföra dessa ceremonier riktigt, så som du lärde våra förfäder i gångna dagar. Om vi gör ett misstag, hav förbarmande med oss. […] välsigna våra barn, vänner och besökare med ett lyckligt liv. Må våra vägar ligga raka och jämna framför oss. Låt oss leva och bli gamla. Vi är alla dina barn och ber om detta med goda hjärtan.

 

Efter bönerna gick männen till tipin där Maahotse vilade och visade den sin vördnad. Kvinnorna tilläts inte gå in utan stannade sjungande kvar utanför. De män som valt ”att skåda solen” befann sig då sedan en tid tillbaka i Noceom, Den ensamma tipin, där de instruerades av en medicinman.

 

 

Under de fyra dagar av dans, festande och ceremonier som Soldansen innefattade fastade de män som valt att underkasta sig Prövningen och under den fjärde dagen då denna ägde rum måste de tiga.

 

Området hade rensats från onda makter. För att fördriva dem ryttare hade galopperat fram och tillbaka. Man hade med stor omsorg valt det högsta och kraftigaste poppelträdet, minst tjugo meter högt; kvistat, rest och målat det med de fyra väderstreckens färger; svart, rött, gult och vitt. Den höga mittpålen dekorerades med färgade band, skalper tagna från fiender, skallar och hudar från bisonoxar. Överst redde man av grenar och örter ett näste åt Åskfågeln som övervakar den övre världen, medan man på marken målade symbolen för den Behornade ormen, underjordens väktare.

 

 

 

Innan den kringgärdande tältduken av buffelhudar restes kring dansplatsen, hängdes från mittpålen en docka, antagligen symboliserande tvedräkt och ondska. Krigare red fram för att ge dockan hårda slag med sina kuppstavar och sände sedan pilar mot den, eller besköt den med gevärseld.

 

 

Sedan följde en låtsasstrid mellan olika krigarförbund och efter det att en symbolisk fred slutits restes slutligen tältduken, men vid Åskfågelns bo lämnades en vid öppning så att solens strålar kunde nå hela inhägnaden. Hest´Osanest´Oste, Det nya livets arena, stod klar och inväntade på fjärde dagen de män som skulle skåda solen.

 

Det finns gott om motstridiga uppgifter om vad som händer under den sista dagen av en Soldans och de som deltagit berättar ogärna om vad som skett. Det är prärieindianernas allra heligaste ceremoni och flera av dem fruktar att utomstående kan solka ner dess heliga status, ödelägga dess mysterium. Enligt deras tro vore det fatalt om en Soldans inte in i minsta detalj fullföljdes på det sätt som dess förvaltare fastslagit. Minsta misstag, eller brott mot traditionen, skulle rubba den balans som Ma´heo´o vakar över.

 

Vad som sker kan inte beskrivas eller skrivas ner av någon som inte själv har skådat solen och även de tiger i allmänhet om vad de upplevt. Dessutom har USAs styresmän gjort allt för att utplåna Soldansen och därmed även tillintetgöra cheyennerna. Soldansen totalförbjöds 1883 och det var inte förrän 1978, genom American Indian Religious Freedom Act, som det inte längre var straffbart att organisera eller deltaga i en Soldans.  

 

Vi saknar därmed i stort sett skildringar av vad som ägde, och äger rum. Undantag finns dock, exempelvis den ovannämnde George Catlin, som efter att ha målat ett porträtt av en Äldste ansvarig för en Soldans fick denne att deklarera att konstnären genom sitt mästerskap var i besittning av mäktig medicin och därmed gav Catlin tillstånd att bevittna en Soldans. Catlin skrev mycket noggrant ner vad han sett och publicerade sin beskrivning, något som dessvärre blev en bidragande orsak till att soldanserna fyrtio år senare förbjöds av USAs regering.

 

 

Traditionen dog dock aldrig ut och soldanser fortsattes att praktiseras mer eller mindre i hemlighet. Under 60- och 70 talen bevistades exempelvis flera soldanser av jesuitprästen Paul Steinmetz, som 1980 försvarade sin doktorsavhandling om Oglala Lakota-siuoxernas religion och samarbete med katolska kyrkan, något som märkligt nog ägde rum vid Stockholms Universitet, fjärran från South Dakota. Steinmetz nämnde i sin avhandling att det hänt att vita män bett att få "skåda solen", men fått avslag med orden: "Ni har förstört er egen religion och vi vill inte att ni gör det samma med vår."

 

Catlin och Steinmetz beskriver med mer än hundra års mellanrum hur de som skall initieras i soldansens innersta mysterium prepareras för sin prövning. De målas över hela kroppen med gul- eller vitfärgad lera, förses med en krona av örter eller örnfjädrar, får en bukett salvia i ena handen och i den andra bär de sin personliga medicinpåse. De förs sedan in bland män som tidigare deltagit i soldansen och som nu väntar på dem i Hest´Osanest´Oste.

 

 

Efter sin långa fasta är de unga männen påtagligt omtöcknade. De ledsagas av rödmålade  medicinmän, även deras fotsulor och handflator är röda, medan såren som visar att de tidigare uthärdat Soldansen är täckta med vit lera. Medicinmännen har skarpslipade knivar i händerna och bär mask så att initianderna inte skall kunna se vem det är som tillfogar dem såren. Med knivarna snittar medicinmännen parallella sår i hud och kött på initiationernas bringor och ryggar, vidgar dem försiktigt och för in spetsade spjälor. Smärtan måste vara i det närmaste outhärdlig.

 

Catlin skrev att det förvånade honom att de sårade männen inte blödde ymnigare – kanske beroende på att fastan drivit blodet in i deras kroppar? En ung man som upptäckt att Catlin intensivt antecknade allt han såg bad att medicinmännen som att få bli placerad på en matta framför den vite mannen. Initianden rörde försiktigt vid konstnärens axel och tecknade med två fingrar åt honom att han skulle blicka honom djupt in i ögonen alltmedan medicinmännen skar i honom. Catlin lydde och såg hur den leende mannen under den plågsamma operationen inte visade minsta tecken på smärta.

 

Medan snitten gjordes sänktes remmar ner från den väldiga hyddan tvärslåar, eller från toppen av mittpålen och fästes sedan vid de spetsade pinnar som förts in genom initiandernas kött. Sedan hissades solskådarna upp tills dess deras fötter svävade fritt någon meter ovanför marken. Brösthuden spändes och vid remmar som fästs vid ryggen hängdes buffelskallar vars tyngd skulle hindra männen från att åla sig i smärta.

 

 

Medan initianderna hissades upp sjöng männen som satt, eller stod, omkring dem lugnande sånger. De hängande männen visade ingen smärta, men tårar rann utmed deras kinder alltmedan de stelt blickade upp mot solskivan som lyste ner i Hest´Osanest´Oste från den breda öppningen vid Åskfågelns bo. De hängde till synes slappt livlösa och efterhand svimmade de, en efter en. Det var då som visionerna grep dem.

 

Då jag läste detta kom jag att tänka på hur vikingatidens Odin sökt visdom genom att hänga från ett träd ”offrande sig åt sig själv”:

 

Jag vet att jag hängde i vindomsusat träd

i nio nätters tid

i nio nätter,

sårad med uddstav, åt Odin given,

själv åt mig själv.

 

Jag fick ej njuta horndryck, ej heller bröd –

jag spanade noga neråt,

runor tog jag upp,

ropande tog jag dem

sedan föll jag ned.

[…]

Då började jag frodas och fatta allt,

växa och trivas väl;

jag letade ut ord utav ord,

en gärning gjorde den andra.

 

 

Soldansarnas huvuden hängde framåt och nedåt. Då någon hamnat i detta tillstånd ropade de församlade: ”Död! Död!” och den livlöse mannen sänktes ned. Tiden för hängningen var mellan femton till tjugo minuter och under den tiden hade de kringsittande höga dignitärerna med stort allvar betraktat initianderna för att avgöra vemav dem som visat störst mod och sinnesfattning. Vem som längst hade uthärdat smärtan utan att klaga, eller svimma. Iakttagelser som sedan låg till grund för vem som kunde tänkas att leda en krigsräd, eller så småningom besätta höga poster inom klanernas förvaltning.

 

 

Att visa styrka, oförväget mod och uthärda smärta var för varje cheyennekrigare begärliga egenskaper. Var och en som aspirerade på att få upptas i något av de prestigefyllda  Nótȧxévėstotȯtse, krigarförbunden – Hjorten, Skölden, Räven eller Bågsträngen – måste ha genomlidit Soldansen. Inom dessa sällskap kunde de även öka sin prestige genom att samla coups, från franskans ”slag/kupp”

 

 

En coup som bevittnats av andra krigare innebar att den som utfört en sådan bedrift kunde fästa en fjäder vid sin fjäderskrud, där varje fjäder antydde olika former av coups – exempelvis att skrudens bärare hade dödat en fiende, blivit sårad i strid, tagit en skalp, eller utfört den djärvaste kuppen av dem alla – närmat sig en beväpnad fiende och enbart slagit till honom med en kuppstav och därefter oskadd kunnat återvända till sina stridskamrater. Nedan en kuppstav, en ledgerbild som återger hur en cheyennekrigare ger en coup till en gevärsbeväpnad Crowkrigare och ett fotografi med en krigsberedd Nótȧxévėstotȯtsekrigare med sin kuppstav.

 

 

Medlemmar av Bågsträngens brödraskap använde sig ofta av en pilbåge, istället för en kuppstav. Nedan syns en av Bågsträngens legendariska krigare, kanske den högt beundrade Woo-ka-nay, av de vita kallad Den romerska näsan, utföra en ovanligt djärv coup genom att slänga pilbågar på två beridna blårockar, d.v.s. U.S. Army kavallerister. Vi ser också hur Howling Wolf hoppat av sin häst och rusat fram för att ge en coup mot en pilbågsbeväpnad pawnekrigare.

 

 

Då de gemensamt drog i strid mot sina motståndare bar cheyennekrigare med sig det heliga pilbyltet Maahotse och fram till 1830 hade det skänkt det dem styrka och seger. Det året red Wakingan Ska, Vitt åskmuller, ut i strid mot pawnerna, Vid Wakingan Skas sida red hans hustru med Maahotse fastbunden vid sin rygg. Under ritten mot slagfältet blev de överraskade av fyra pawnekrigare och Wakingan Ska föll från sin häst. Han lyckades dock rusa fram till sin hustru och slita till sig Maahotse som han sedan slängde över till krigs-shamanen Tjuren, som omgående band fast den vid sitt spjut. Pawnekrigarna förstod att cheyennerna ännu inte hunnit att yttra de maktord som var nödvändiga för att strax innan striderna aktivera Maahostses styrka. En dödligt sårad pawne såg nu sin chans att genom en hjältemodig coupe vinna tillträde till de Sälla jaktmarkerna. Han rusade fram mot Tjuren som stötte sitt spjut i honom, men innan pawnekrigaren dog hade han lyckats slita loss Maahotse från Tjurens spjut och slänga den till sina medkämpar. På så vis förlorade cheyennerna Ma´heo´os beskydd och deras olyckor hopade sig. 

 

 

Vid ett möte 1835 lyckades cheyennerna köpa tillbaka en pil från Maahotsebyltet, det kostade dem hundra hästar och 1843 köpte de för samma pris hela byltet från lakotakrigare som erövrat det från pawnerna, men då saknades två pilar. Det tycks som om lyckan stått dem bi innan cheyenennerna förlorade sin Maahostse. Visserligen fortsatte de skoningslöst bekriga speciellt Crow-, Kiowa- och Comanchefolken. Men, de slöt förbund med siouxerna, de sydliga apacherna och framförallt Arapaho, som blev deras brödrafolk. Nedan skildrar Howling Wolf hur ledarna för de två folken ingår sitt för all framtid bestående avtal.

 

 

 

 

Striderna med Crow och Kiowa var också framgångsrika. Här syns hur Woo-ka-nay med sina krigare återvänder med skalpprydda spjut efter en batalj med Kiowas.

 

 

Men ... då Maahotse förlorats blev tecknen på olycka allt vanligare. Inte mindre än 48 bågsträngskrigare dödades 1836 vid ett bakhåll arrangerat av kiowakrigare. Hämnden blev gruvlig då cheyenne- och arapaho krigare anföll ett kiowaläger 1838, men striden blev så blodig att samtliga parter förskräcktes och slöt fred 1840. En raid för att stjäla boskap i Mexiko som 1853 gemensamt utfördes av forna fiender bland kiowa-, arapaho-, cheyenne- och apachekrigare slutade dock i katastrof då en stor mängd av dem nedgjordes av enheter ur den mexikanska armén - de fruktade lansiärerna. 

 

 

En långt värre katastrof var dock i annalkande. Det Amerikanska inbördeskriget som utkämpades mellan 1861 och 1865, ledde till att fyra miljoner slavar befriades och att USA slutligen enades till en framgångsrik nation, men det innebar också indianernas slutgiltiga och definitiva kapitulation inför den hänsynslöst rasistiska anstormningen av USA regering, som nära nog ledde till deras slutgiltiga förintelse.

 

På grund av behovet av snabba trupptransporter hade under kriget järnvägsnätet i Nordstaterna, utvecklats med en tidigare oanad hastighet och effektivitet. För att knyta de västliga regionerna tätare till krigsansträngningarna och underlätta tillgången till naturresurser längre västerut började Unionsregeringen 1862 bygga en transkontinental järnvägslinje som skulle knyta östkusten till västkusten och längs sin väg leda till konstruktionen av städer som skulle utveckla omkringliggande områden.

 

 

Ett initiativ som kopplades till den så kallade Homesteadlagen som i maj 1862 fastslog att varje amerikansk medborgare som uppnått myndig ålder, eller var familjeförsörjare, och under fem års tid förpliktigade sig att odla, eller på annat sätt produktivt utnyttja, en areal på högst 160 acres (65 hektar), skulle därefter vara dess rättmätige ägare. Detta initiativ ledde efterhand till att invandringen från Europas fattiga jordbruksområden ökade, inte minst från de nordiska länderna. Efter inbördeskriget ökade även jordbruksproduktionen lavinartat, något som även gynnade livsmedels-, vapen- och textilproduktionen.

 

 

Långt innan kriget hade USAs regeringar betraktat indianerna som ett stort hinder för en sådan utveckling. En tanke som tydliggjordes av Donald J. Trumps store idol Andrew Jacksons i hans installationstal 1830:

 

Flera medborgare har beklagat det sorgliga öde som drabbat nationens ursprungsbefolkning. Man har med välvilja under många år förgäves sökt finna en lösning för att hindra denna utveckling. En efter en har den ena mäktiga stammen efter den andra försvunnit från jordens yta. Att följa sin sista rasfrände till graven och vandra över utdöda folks gravar väcker melankoliska reflektioner. Men en djupare reflektion kring sådana förändringar väcker insikten om att vad som sker är som när en generation försvinner för att ge plats åt en annan. Vilken välvillig person skulle kunna tänkas föredra ett land täckt av obanade skogar med ett tusental fritt kringströvande vildar, istället för vår omfattande Republik, fylld som den är av städer, byar och välmående jordbruk?

 

Enligt Pesident Jackson måste indianerna bort och under hans ledning lagstadgades den så kallade Indian Removal Act, som möjliggjorde tvångsförvisningen av ursprungsbefolkningar från sina förfäders marker. Under Jacksons ledning fördrevs mer än 45 000 indianer med våld från sina bosättningsområden. En skoningslös politik som fortsattes under efterträdaren Martin van Buren, vars första åtgärd som president var att iscensätta den av Jackson planerade "omplaceringen” av Cherokéer, vilken innebar att mer än 4000 män, kvinnor och barn miste livet under den så kallade Trail of Tears, Tårarnas väg, då en hel befolkningsgrupp tvingades bosätta sig på betydligt magrare jordar och fullständig buffelfattiga områden. Nedan ser vi Donald J. Trump i det porträtt som han, då hans presidentskap avslutats, funderar på att pryda Vita Huset med. I bakgrunden skymtar en kopia av Andrew Jacksons ryttarstaty, som nu är placerad framför Vita Huset. Förutom USAs ursprungsbefolkning som med goda skäl betraktar honom med avsky, är Jackson heller inte speciellt populär bland USAs svarta befolkning. Han var plantageägare och ägare till en stor mängd slavar, av vilka 150 skötte hans whiskeybryggeri, givetvis oavlönade och utsatta för godtyckligt våld.

 

 

Inbördeskrigets segrande general Ulysses S. Grant blev president 1869 efter det att Andrew Johnson, som tagit över presidentämbetet efter mordet på Lincoln 1865, hade schabblat bort sitt mandat genom en mängd skandaler som lett till hans impeachment. Grant var inte indianfientlig, men ärvde en politik som spärrat in en trilskande ursprungsbefolkning i reservat där de blivit beroende av nyckfullt anländande mattransporter, något som vi sett fick förödande effekter i Minnesota 1862.

 

Som en djupt kristen person, deklarerade Grant vid sitt makttillträde, kunde han omöjligt acceptera åsikten om att Gud skapat människor för att de som trodde sig vara starkare hade rätt att förgöra dem som de ansåg vara svagare. Grant hade i Kalifornien och Oregon haft samröre med indianer och ansåg att de blivit offer för hur statligt anställda tjänstemän skamligen lurat dem på de förnödenheter och rättigheter de utlovats genom en mängd olika traktater. Dessutom hade de decimerats av smittkoppor och mässling som drabbat dem genom de vitas närvaro.

 

 

Ulysses Grant tillsatte sin vän indianen och advokaten Ely S. Parker, var ursprungliga namn var Ha-sa-no-an-da, som Högste Kommissionär för Indianska Angelägenheter och utarbetade tillsammans med honom en politik som syftade till göra medlemmarna av USAs ursprungsbefolkning till likaberättigade amerikanska medborgare. Dessvärre var Styrelsen för Indianska Angelägenheter till största delen sammansatt av förmögna entreprenörer som var rabiata motståndare till sin ordförande och ledare. Speciellt en uttalat rasistisk ledamot, William Welsh, ledde en hetskampanj mot Ely Parker, som han betraktade som en vilde som varit fräck nog att ställa sig in hos USAs president, gifta sig med en en vit kvinna och nu tilläts utöva ett partiskt inflytande över angelägenheter som rörde hans "rasfränder". Welsh såg till att Parker anklagades för förskingring av statliga medel och även om ett kongressutskott friade honom från samtliga misstankar var skandalen ett faktum. Parker avgick och Grants indianpolitik kom att lida stora nederlag, speciellt efter det att en indianledare, modochövdingen Kintepuasch, som tillsammans med sina stamfränder hade fördrivits från sitt ursprungsområde och då han återvänt tvingats förhandla med medlemmar ur amerikanska armén i deperat förtvivlan sköt ner huvudförhandlaren, General Edward Canby.

 

 

Ursinnet hos Grants motståndare kände inga gränser. Efter hårda strider fångades Kintepuasch in och avrättades. Än värre blev det dock efter Custers nederlag vid Little Bighorn, som Grant skyllde på "taktiska misstag under ett regelrätt krig". Grants presidentskap vacklade inför den allmänna opinionens hets mot hans "misslyckade" indianpolitik, påspätt med irritation över korruption och maktmissbruk som blivit endemiska under Grant presidentskap, fast han uppenbarligen gjorde allt för att stävja det. Presidenten fick krypa till korset och överlät "indianfrågans lösning" till sin krigskamrat General William Sherman och hans underlydande, den notoriske indianhataren General Philip Sheridan, även han en hjälte från Inbördeskrigets Unionssida.

 

Om nu Grant verkligen var välvilligt inställd till USAs ursprungsbefolkning så framstår det som något märkligt att han tillsatte Sherman som militäriskt ansvarig för allt territorium väster om Mississippifloden och därmed huvudansvaret för skyddet av järnvägsbygget mot väst och de nybyggarkaravaner som förde med sig bönder som kommit i åtnjutande av homesteadlagen. Shermans uppdrag skulle tveklöst föra med sig konfrontationer med prärieindianerna, av vilka flera motsatte sig järnvägsbygget väl medvetna om att det var ännu ett steg mot utplånandet av deras livsföring.

 

Redan innan Grant blivit president hade Sherman skrivit till honom att en förutsättning för järnvägsbyggandet vore att inte låta några "stjälande, sjabbiga indianer hindra och sätta stopp för de framsteg som järnvägen för med sig". Då Gerillakrigaren Crazy Horse som ledare för ett band med 10 sioux-, arapaho-, och cheyennekrigare 1866 lurat in 81 amerikanska soldater i ett bakhåll och nedgjort dem till sista man skrev Sherman till Grant och rådde honom att så fort han blivit president "måste agera med hämnande beslutsamhet mot siouxerna även om det innebär ett utrotande av dem; män, kvinnor och barn." Det kan omöjligt tolkas som en indianvänlig handling att utse en sådan man som befälhavare över USA västliga militärstyrkor.

 

 

När Grant slutligen gav upp sina planer att tillerkänna ursprungsbefolkningen amerikanskt medborgarskap tillkännagav han motvilligt att "reservatslösningen" antagligen var det enda som kunde leda till indianernas "pacificering":

 

Man får hoppas att de som där föredrar att följa sina traditionella levnadsvanor [inom reservaten] kan respekteras och tas hand om på ett sådant sätt att de inser att om de vill undvika ett fullständigt utrotande så är detta den enda möjligheten som står dem till buds

 

En ytterst olycklig utveckling av Grants reträtt var att hans "fredspolitik" tillät utrotandet av bisonoxarna som en metod för att tvinga prärieindianerna till att bli jordbrukande och boskapsskötande medborgare. Blev man av med de väldiga buffelhjordarna skulle de heller inte hindra tågens framfart och förstöra böndernas odlingar.

 

 

General Shermans val för att sköta ”indianernas pacificering” var General Philip Henry Sheridan. Han var enbart 165 cm lång, men kompenserade sin oansenliga längd med en hård attityd och fallenhet för smicker. Under Inbördeskriget blev Sheridan en hjälte genom sina djärva operationer, exempelvis så spreds över Nordstaterna en våldsamt populär hyllningsdikt om honom – Sheridans ritt av en viss Thomas Buchanan Read:

 

Hurrah! hurrah for Sheridan!
Hurrah! hurrah for horse and man!
And when their statues are placed on high,
Under the dome of the Union sky,
The American soldier's Temple of Fame;
There with the glorious general's name,
Be it said, in letters both bold and bright,
"Here is the steed that saved the day,
By carrying Sheridan into the fight,
From Winchester, twenty miles away!"

 

 

Under Inbördeskriget var Sheridan den som mest framgångsrikt använde sig av Den brända jordens teknik, det vill säga att förstöra fiendetruppernas möjlighet att utnyttja de naturresurser de behövde för sitt underhåll. En teknik han sedan använde i kampen mot indianerna. För honom innebar det främst bufflarnas utrotande.

 

Det Transkontinentala Jänvägskompaniet hade deklarerat krig mot bufflarna. Jägare som Buffalo Bill anställdes för att leverera buffelkött till rallarna och dessutom döda så många bisonoxar de kunde. Då järnvägen stod klar 1869 intensifierades slakten. Tusentals jägare anlände västerut för att ägna sig åt nöjesjakt. Det fanns till och med speciella buffeltåg från vilka jägare från fönster och tak sköt oräkneliga 700 kilos djur, vars kadaver lämnades att ruttna på prärien. Till skillnad från indianerna som dödade bisonoxar för mat, kläder och skydd dödade dessa nöjesjägare djuren för sitt nöjes skull.

 

 

Inte undra på att tågen ofta anfölls och det går heller inte att förneka att de allt större skarorna med nybyggare även de betraktades som ett hot av flera indiankrigare som anföll deras vagnskolonner och bosättningar. Nybyggarfamiljer slogs ihjäl, men betydligt fler indianfamiljer dödades av den amerikanska armén och dess övermakt och effektivitet var hundrafalt större än spridda indianska krigarenheter.

 

 

Då lagstiftare från Texas i Senaten lade fram ett lagförslag för att stoppa bufflarnas totala utrotning, motsattes förslaget av General Sheridan med hänvisning till att om bisonoxarna försvann skulle indíanproblemet vara löst. Han passade på att hylla buffeljägarnas insatser:

 

Dessa män har gjort mer under de senaste två åren och kommer att göra än mer nästa år för att lösa den irriterade indianska frågan. De har åstadkommit mer än vad hela den ordinarie armén har uträttat under de senaste fyrtio åren. De förstör indianernas födkrok och det är ett välkänt faktum att om en armé förlorar sin försörjning hamnar den i ett olösligt nödläge. Skicka dem mer krut och och blly; för en bestående fred … låt dem döda, flå och sälja allt, tills dess bufflarna har utrotas. Först då kan prärierna täckas med fläckiga nötkreatur.

 

 

 

När indianhövdingen Tosawi 1869 inför Sheridan beklagade sitt folks öde och bedyrade “Jag Tosawi. Jag god indian”, svarade Sheridan att “den enda goda indianen är en död indian".

 

Vid slutet av 1800-talet levde enbart 300 bisonoxar i naturligt tillstånd. Kongressen beslöt då att den enda överlevande buffelflocken till varje pris skulle skyddas. Den befann sig i Yellowstones Nationalpark som instiftats 1872 och som bland sina initiativtagare räknade med ingen mindre än General Sheridan. Fem år senare poängterade han i sin Årsrapport till Kongressen järnvägens roll i kriget mot indianerna och klämde då även fram ett par krokodiltårar över deras sorgliga öde genom att påpeka att de fördrivits till reservaten utan någon annan kompensation än löften om religionsundervisning och leveranser av mat och kläder – löften som sällan hade infriats:

 

Vi tog ifrån dem deras land och försörjning, förstörde deras levnadssätt, spred sjukdomar och förfall bland dem. Det var därför de tog till strid, det var därför de förde krig. Vad annat kunde man förvänta sig? Hur kan man över huvud taget fråga sig vad det indianska dilemmat består av?

 

Med tiden hade Sheridan blivit ordentligt hatad av sin klasskamrat från West Points officersakademi, General George Crook, som här sitter till vänster om honom på ett kort taget under deras tid vid akademin.

 

 

Till skillnad från Sheridan var Crook ingen indianföraktare utan pendlade i sitt samröre med ursprungsbefolkningen ständigt mellan förhandlingar och strid, mellan medlidande och attack. En del av Crooks taktik var att utnyttja indianernas inre stridigheter och ständiga fienders ömsesidiga kunskap om varandra. Hans vänskap med flera indianer och utnyttjandet av dem som spejare och manskap retade hans chef General Sheridan, men väckte även avsky hos de indiankrigare som bekämpade dem. Cheyennerna hade exempelvis svårt att förlika sig med de pawnes som ofta kämpade på Crooks sida och gav dem sällan någon nåd om de kom i deras krigares händer.